Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Snail Food Recipe (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/invertebrates/snail-food-recipe-19455/)

Lupin 11-28-2008 05:12 PM

Snail Food Recipe
 
Has anybody fed homemade snail jello to their snails? I've tried a recipe from a fellow invert enthusiast and it seems the brigs and canas really shovel them in.:shock:

Honey
Baby food (any brand)
Calcium pills (optional)
Fish food (optional)
Unflavored gelatin

Here is what I did.

1. Boil water in the pot. Pour the gelatin in there and keep stirring.
2. Pour baby food into a microwaveable container and set microwave at medium and keep it on for a minute.
3. Mix baby food with honey, crushed calcium pills (fine powder) and then fish foods.
4. Pour the mixed baby foods with gelatin.
5. Let it cool off for a few minutes and place it in the fridge afterwards.

Thought I'd share this one.;-) There are a few other recipes I haven't done yet but I'm doing it soon enough when I have more time especially as Christmas is near.

By the way, the calcium pills I am using are Caltrate 600mg with Vitamin D. It can be either put there or simply drop it to the tank and the snails simply shovel them in. Honey is put there because the shy snails seem to approach it readily as they like anything sugary.

iamntbatman 11-28-2008 09:56 PM

What sort of baby food are you using, vegetable or meat based? Or, I guess they make baby food that's a mixture of both.

Lupin 11-28-2008 10:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iamntbatman (Post 154888)
What sort of baby food are you using, vegetable or meat based? Or, I guess they make baby food that's a mixture of both.

I used the Gerber brand with peas, carrots and other vegetables as ingredients. No meaty foods for them. Look for the ingredients before buying. You'll want vegetable matter there that are high in calcium. It doesn't matter what brand you are using.

I amended the post. I just realized I missed out the measurements.

Quote:

Honey
Baby food (any brand)
Calcium pills (optional)
Fish food (optional)
Unflavored gelatin

Here is what I did.

1. Boil water in the pot. Pour 2-3 tablespoons of gelatin in there and keep stirring.
2. Pour 4-6 ounces of baby food into a microwaveable container and set microwave at medium and keep it on for a minute.
3. Mix baby food with a tablespoon or two of honey, 3-4 crushed calcium pills (fine powder) and then 2-3 tablespoons of fish foods.
4. Pour the mixed baby foods with gelatin. Stir and make sure there are not thick bubbles as you mix them.
5. Let it cool off for a few minutes and place it in the fridge afterwards.

Thought I'd share this one. There are a few other recipes I haven't done yet but I'm doing it soon enough when I have more time especially as Christmas is near.

By the way, the calcium pills I am using are Caltrate 600mg with Vitamin D. It can be either put there or simply drop it to the tank and the snails simply shovel them in. Honey is put there because the shy snails seem to approach it readily as they like anything sugary.

P.S. I tried this on my loaches and everyone went mad to grab the food. My BN plecos also grab their fair share of food with the snails.http://www.mypalhs.com/forums/images/smilies/happy.gif

Lupin 11-28-2008 10:40 PM

Here's a list of vegetables and fruits with highest calcium content. Always aim for high calcium content needed by their shells. Collards are best.

Quote:

nannasmom wrote:
I would caution us all to remember when feeding these foods that the phosphorous can have an ill effect on your water quality and may cause an algae bloom if the levels of phosphorous become too high.


Calcium:Phosphorus Ratio -- Vegetables

14.5:1 -- Collards
7.5:1 -- Spinach, Mustard
4.5:1 -- Turnip Greens
4.3:1 -- Lambsquarters
3.2:1 -- Dill Weed
3.0:1 -- Beet Greens
2.8:1 -- Dandelion Greens
2.8:1 -- Chinese Cabbage (pak-choi)
2.7:1 -- Lettuce, LooseLeaf
2.4:1 -- Mustard Greens
2.4:1 -- Parsley
2.4:1 -- Kale
2.1:1 -- Chicory Greens
2.0:1 -- Spinach
2.0:1 -- Watercress
2.0:1 -- Cabbage
1.9:1 -- Endive
1.6:1 -- Celery
1.5:1 -- Purslane
1.4:1 -- Cilantro
1.4:1 -- Lettuce, Butterhead (Boston, Bibb)
1.3:1 -- Okra
1.1:1 -- Swiss Chard
1.1:1 -- Turnip
1.1:1 -- Chard, Swiss
1.0:1 -- Squash (winter, all varieties)
1.0:1 -- Green Beans
0.8:1 -- Lettuce, Romaine
0.8:1 -- Sweet Potato
0.8:1 -- Rutabaga
0.7:1 -- Broccoli
0.7:1 -- Cucumber (with skin)
0.6:1 -- Carrots
0.6:1 -- Squash (summer, all varieties)
0.6:1 -- Carrots, Baby
0.6:1 -- Brussels Sprouts
0.5:1 -- Cauliflower
0.5:1 -- Kohlrabi
0.5:1 -- Pumpkin
0.5:1 -- Alfalfa Sprouts
0.5:1 -- Parsnips
0.5:1 -- Peppers,Green
0.5:1 -- Peppers,Red
0.4:1 -- Sweet Potato Leaves
0.4:1 -- Beets
0.4:1 -- Asparagus
0.2:1 -- Tomato
.02:1 -- Corn, White

Calcium:Phosphorus Ratio -- Fruits

4.8:1 -- Papaya
2.9:1 -- Orange
1.8:1 -- Lime
1.8:1 -- Raspberries
1.6:1 -- Lemon (no peel)
1.5:1 -- Blackberries
1.5:1 -- Grapefruit, White
1.2:1 -- Grapefruit, Pink and Red
1.2:1 -- Tangerine
1.0:1 -- Pineapple
1.0:1 -- Pear
1.0:1 -- Apple (with Skin)
0.9:1 -- Mango
0.9:1 -- Watermelon
0.8:1 -- Cherries, Sweet
0.8:1 -- Grapes
0.8:1 -- Cranberries
0.7:1 -- Casaba Melon
0.7:1 -- Apricots
0.7:1 -- Kiwi
0.7:1 -- Strawberries
0.6:1 -- Cantaloupe
0.6:1 -- Honeydew Melon
0.6:1 -- Blueberries
0.5:1 -- Persimmon, Japanese
0.5:1 -- Raisins, Seedless
0.4:1 -- Peach
0.4:1 -- Plum
0.3:1 -- Nectarine
0.3:1 -- Banana

Lupin 01-10-2009 07:58 PM

Calcium Blocks

What you need
400 grams of plaster of Paris (Dap is often recommended but I used Bronco)
50-100 grams of fish food (pellets or granules are best)
A tupperware
Stick to stir
Ice cube trays

Instructions
Pour the plaster of Paris over the clean water. Stir as you pour until the plaster of Paris look like thick paste. Then try to mix in the fishfood as you stir and pour the mix to the ice cube trays. Make sure to smoothen the plaster of Paris as you pour. Place them in a warm dry place for a few hours. You can place the fan on it if you feel it necessary. Afterwards, twist the ice cube trays to remove the calcium blocks.

Notes
The more humid the environment, the longer it takes to dry the plaster of Paris. It should harden as a rock and sink. Be careful not to allow any thick bubbles as you work on it. If the calcium blocks have gooey stuff at the center, then it is not dry enough. It should also not break apart.

Lupin 01-11-2009 05:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lupin (Post 162439)
Calcium Blocks

What you need
400 grams of plaster of Paris (Dap is often recommended but I used Bronco)
50-100 grams of fish food (pellets or granules are best)
A tupperware
Stick to stir
Ice cube trays

Instructions
Pour the plaster of Paris over the clean water. Stir as you pour until the plaster of Paris look like thick paste. Then try to mix in the fishfood as you stir and pour the mix to the ice cube trays. Make sure to smoothen the plaster of Paris as you pour. Place them in a warm dry place for a few hours. You can place the fan on it if you feel it necessary. Afterwards, twist the ice cube trays to remove the calcium blocks.

Notes
The more humid the environment, the longer it takes to dry the plaster of Paris. It should harden as a rock and sink. Be careful not to allow any thick bubbles as you work on it. If the calcium blocks have gooey stuff at the center, then it is not dry enough. It should also not break apart.

Added notes:

I can't believe I forgot to add that despite the claim of some plaster of Paris brands that it will cure in an hour or so, it is best to let the plaster of Paris pucks sit in a dry area for a week. At least, this will minimize breaking down of the pucks. It has to be dried completely.

Also, for storage, they are best kept in an area where there is little or no humidity. Refrigeration is probably best. You don't want mildew growing on your pucks. For better understanding about mildew, click here.

Little-Fizz 01-15-2009 12:24 PM

Is there a substitute for gelatin?

Lupin 01-15-2009 06:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Little-Fizz (Post 163789)
Is there a substitute for gelatin?

Hmmm...I've never known someone to not have gelatin available in her area.:-? Maybe just proceed to the plaster of Paris pucks? Honestly the plaster recipe is less hassle and lasts longer than the snail jello recipe anyway. I made enough to last two months and kept them in my fridge.

Little-Fizz 01-16-2009 10:04 AM

Ah true, thank you.

Lol I could get getalin... But yeah, lol I'm vegan and I don't eat anything that comes from an animal and I don't buy anything that has animal products in it or is tested on animals. It just doesn't fly ;)

Where do I find this plaster of paris? Is it actually plaster?

kylearch 01-16-2009 03:32 PM

Alternatives to gelatin
 
Website has several alternatives you may find interesting and should work similarly :-D
VegCooking > Vegetarian Cooking > Gelatin Alternatives


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