Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/)
-   Beginner Freshwater Aquarium (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/)
-   -   Beginner's Tank Cycling Question (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/beginners-tank-cycling-question-19398/)

julsicat 11-25-2008 01:31 AM

Beginner's Tank Cycling Question
 
Hi, I just got my first fish tank and in doing some research, I learned about fishless cycling. I started the pure ammonia method a couple days ago, but the articles I've read have not addressed what type of filter media I should (not) be using at this point. I have one of those 3-gallon Eclipse systems that comes with a Bio-Wheel. Is the Bio-Wheel enough for now? The filter cartridge that came with it is filled with activated carbon. Is it ok to add that now or will it screw things up? Should I get some additional filter media? Oh, and the filter is not very powerful. I was thinking of adding an airstone, but I don't know if it's really necessary. I could use any helpful tips. I'm trying to be patient, but of course I would like this process to go as quickly as possible. Thanks! :-D

onefish2fish 11-25-2008 01:51 AM

what size is the tank? and what do you plan on keeping in it?

filters are for sucking up poopy but really more for housing the benificial bacteria (along with gravel/plants/etc) that your tank is gaining when you cycle as well as keeping the water from going stagnent.

julsicat 11-25-2008 07:12 PM

As great as that reply was, it doesn't answer any of my questions. Please someone actually READ my post & give me some advice. Thanks! <3

julsicat 11-25-2008 07:29 PM

To clarify, this is regarding the cycling stage only. I plan to add the filter cartridge before I put in fish. Also, there are plenty of surfaces in the tank.

andulrich4all 11-25-2008 09:51 PM

I think you are fine with the Bio-Wheel and the cartridge that came with it. I use a bio-wheel and it does a great job. You should not need an airstone, what size tank do you have? do you have gravel and plants in the tank?

onefish2fish 11-26-2008 02:06 AM

with all do respect to you, this is not your personal hotline where people come and answer your questions.
i simply asked my questions to get a better understanding on answering your question. you state it doesnt seem like the filter does alot, or if you should add anything else. different fish have different bioloads and like different flows. a low flowing filter would be perfect for a betta. im sorry for the misunderstanding, but being as specific as possible allows for better responses.

iamntbatman 11-26-2008 02:42 AM

I don't own an Eclipse tank but from what I've heard the filters tend to be fairly powerful. Bio-wheels are an excellent form of biological filtration so you're probably pretty solid with just that as your primary biomedia. Any other filter media you use would be for mechanical or chemical filtration. In my opinion, extra chemical filtration (or any at all, for that matter) really isn't essential. You'd only need mechanical filtration above and beyond what the regular filter pad does if you're keeping something really messy in your tank, such as a dwarf puffer. An airstone shouldn't be needed and would be detrimental to any fish that likes calmer water, like a betta.

1077 11-26-2008 07:05 AM

OP stated the tank was three gal. OnefishTwofish was correct in asking what fish were being kept in three gal. A dozen tetras would be more of a bioload than one Betta. Biowheel as others have stated provides large surface area for bacteria to colonize but it colonizes or develops in direct proportion to the available bioload. It is not unusual IME to see a spike in ammonia, and nitrites if too many fish are added too quickly to a new tank despite using fishless maturing method. Some would say otherwise. In any event, a three gal tank will be very unforgiving in regards water quality which I believe all would agree with. Maint will need to be performed religously. OP stated that they would like the process to go quickly . It goes like it goes. Tolerance and patience are needed. OP appears to be lacking in both areas.

Tyyrlym 11-26-2008 08:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by julsicat (Post 154239)
Hi, I just got my first fish tank and in doing some research, I learned about fishless cycling. I started the pure ammonia method a couple days ago, but the articles I've read have not addressed what type of filter media I should (not) be using at this point. I have one of those 3-gallon Eclipse systems that comes with a Bio-Wheel. Is the Bio-Wheel enough for now?

Yes. In a marineland filter the biowheel is there to handle biological filtration. Beneficial bacteria will build up on the blue filter cartridge as a matter of course but the biowheel will handle the lion's share of the biological filtration.

Quote:

The filter cartridge that came with it is filled with activated carbon. Is it ok to add that now or will it screw things up?
Putting one of the cartridges in right now won't hurt the cycle, but its not going to help it either. If you've got bits and pieces of junk floating in the water and want to filter them out then put in the cartridge, otherwise i wouldn't bother.

Quote:

Should I get some additional filter media?
No, the filter in the tank has plenty of ability to handle all three types of filtration. To be honest I'm not familiar enough with the Eclipse tanks to even know if you've got room for it.

Quote:

Oh, and the filter is not very powerful. I was thinking of adding an airstone, but I don't know if it's really necessary.
In terms of GPH the filter on an Eclipse tank is actually pretty powerful. Adding an airstone wouldn't do anything for filtration. If you like the look go for it but its really more of an aesthetic choice on this kind of tank.

Quote:

I could use any helpful tips. I'm trying to be patient, but of course I would like this process to go as quickly as possible. Thanks! :-D
As it's been asked what are your stocking plans? A 3 gallon tank is rather small and will be unforgiving if its over stocked.

julsicat 11-26-2008 11:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tyyrlym (Post 154438)
Yes. In a marineland filter the biowheel is there to handle biological filtration. Beneficial bacteria will build up on the blue filter cartridge as a matter of course but the biowheel will handle the lion's share of the biological filtration.


Putting one of the cartridges in right now won't hurt the cycle, but its not going to help it either. If you've got bits and pieces of junk floating in the water and want to filter them out then put in the cartridge, otherwise i wouldn't bother.


No, the filter in the tank has plenty of ability to handle all three types of filtration. To be honest I'm not familiar enough with the Eclipse tanks to even know if you've got room for it.


In terms of GPH the filter on an Eclipse tank is actually pretty powerful. Adding an airstone wouldn't do anything for filtration. If you like the look go for it but its really more of an aesthetic choice on this kind of tank.


As it's been asked what are your stocking plans? A 3 gallon tank is rather small and will be unforgiving if its over stocked.

Thanks, I really appreciate your help. I guess I'll put that filter cartridge in. The water is a little yellow right now. (Driftwood?)

I'm happy to hear that my filter is actually stronger than I thought. It's just not Niagara Falls or anything, and I was wondering if the aeration it provides will be enough to get the bacteria nice & happy. Haha, I ended up buying an air pump yesterday. I just can't help myself when it comes to spending (and/or wasting) money. :tongue:

I have my fish choices narrowed down to two options: one dwarf puffer or two scarlet badis. I'm leaning toward the dwarf puffer. I don't want the scarlet badis to have territorial issues if I am only able to get males. I've also read that the scarlet badis are "easy to keep if you respect their water quality standards" (or something to that effect). I think that may mean meticulous cleaning & constant vigilance. I don't want to kill them if I'm not up to par. I understand both species will most likely need frozen food and that the scarlet badis may need live. Eventually, I would like to add a ghost shrimp or red cherry shrimp. I'm not sure if the dwarf puffer would eat it. I've read that's sort of hit or miss.

Planting is sparse at this point, just a few sections of java fern attached to driftwood. I'm thinking of adding java moss & some kind of background plant. I'd like something that will come close to matching the java fern in light requirements & ease of care. I tried some aponogeton bulbs & decided to remove them from the tank when they turned fuzzy. Eww. The local shop has a pretty good selection of plants. I just have to do some research. Should there be enough carbon dioxide (from the air and/or bacteria) in the tank to sustain moderate planting before fish are added?

I'm feeling some remorse for not getting a bigger tank. A 5-gal hex actually would have been a little cheaper. I'm more attracted to the bowfront design, but I guess a 6- or 12-gal would have been a better choice for someone with my limited experience. :doh!:

:thankyou:


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:59 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2