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-   -   Are these fish compatible? (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/saltwater-fish/these-fish-compatible-19019/)

karaim 11-05-2008 03:00 PM

Are these fish compatible?
 
At first I was thinking of having a reef tank, but I am now looking towards the more aggressive fish and were wondering if they were compatible with each other and/or my tank size. I have a 125 gallon with live rock (about 100 pounds of live rock in the display and another 125 in the sump). I can move it around if necessary. Here is the fish list I was looking at. Some of these fish are very aggressive, while others are peaceful. I am not sure if the more peaceful fish will survive.

Koran Angelfish
Imperator Angelfish
Blue Tang (maybe too peaceful)??
Yellow Tang (maybe too peaceful)??
Niger Triggrfish
Ungulate Triggerfish
Banana Wrasse
Marina Betta
Yellow Goatfish (probably too big)??
Puffer (not sure which one yet)

Since I can't have inverts in this tank, is there a saltwater catfish of some sort that will clean up the bottom of my tank. I included the Yellow Goatfish in my list, but that one might be too huge.

Are there any other bright colored fish that I am missing?

karaim 11-05-2008 03:20 PM

Just to clarify, I am not thinking of getting ALL of these fish - I realize the tank would be too crowded. I am just considering my choices among the fish listed above.

karaim 11-06-2008 03:17 PM

I have settled on the following fish for my 125 gallon setup.

(2) Maroon or Clarkii Clownfish (max size - 6 inches)
(1) Koran Angelfish (max size 15 inches)
(1) Blue Tang (max size 12 inches)
(1) Niger Triggerfish (max size 12 inches)
(1) Banana Wrasse (max size 12 inches)
(1) Spiny Box Puffer (max size 12 inches)

Any comments or suggestions?

It'sJames 11-06-2008 05:17 PM

Seems like a lot of fish to me, at least if you're getting them anywhere near adult size. Even little baby fish can grow into big fish. :)

Kellsindell 11-07-2008 10:57 AM

The only thing i have an issue with is possibly the puffer and Maroons. Puffers like to eat things that are smaller then it's mouth and don't try to do a reef after you get him please because it'll be just a waste of money.

The maroons, if you don't get them mated they can be very aggressive to eachother and other clowns.

All the fish you are planning on getting are huge when they get older i do hope you are going to upgrade after a few, because those fish are going to demand it as a need.

Pasfur 11-08-2008 06:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by karaim (Post 150983)
I have settled on the following fish for my 125 gallon setup.
(2) Maroon or Clarkii Clownfish (max size - 6 inches)
(1) Koran Angelfish (max size 15 inches)
(1) Blue Tang (max size 12 inches)
(1) Niger Triggerfish (max size 12 inches)
(1) Banana Wrasse (max size 12 inches)
(1) Spiny Box Puffer (max size 12 inches)
Any comments or suggestions?

I missed this thread originally, and maybe its not to late...

The Spiny Box Puffer is almost impossible to keep in captivity. This fish should be left in the ocean.

karaim 11-09-2008 12:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kellsindell (Post 151100)
The only thing i have an issue with is possibly the puffer and Maroons. Puffers like to eat things that are smaller then it's mouth and don't try to do a reef after you get him please because it'll be just a waste of money.

The maroons, if you don't get them mated they can be very aggressive to eachother and other clowns.

All the fish you are planning on getting are huge when they get older i do hope you are going to upgrade after a few, because those fish are going to demand it as a need.

Thank you. I am not planning on keeping a reef. It'll just be the fish.

I was thinking of getting either a mated pair of maroons or just one. I settled on getting just one. I know that unless they are mated, they will fight.

My only concern was whether these fish would be compatible with each other.

karaim 11-09-2008 12:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pasfur (Post 151189)
I missed this thread originally, and maybe its not to late...

The Spiny Box Puffer is almost impossible to keep in captivity. This fish should be left in the ocean.

Thanks Pasfur. Is the dog face puffer easier to keep?

karaim 11-09-2008 12:59 AM

One more question. Will a yellow goatfish be compatible with the adult fish? I want a bottom feeder that will eat all the crap at the bottom of the tank. I am not sure if the goatfish is too timid for the above fish.

If the goatfish is not a good choice, does anyone have any suggestions for a cleanup crew for a predatory tank?

Pasfur 11-09-2008 07:37 AM

The DogFace Puffer is a sturdy fish that lives well in captivity, provided you give it space to grow and lots of care. The biggest problem with this fish is its massive size. I would suggest a minimum tank size of 220 gallons. Additionally, their teeth grow non-stop and require special care. Many hobbyists actually provide dental care for this fish.

As to the goatfish, I think you are attempting to use a freshwater theory and apply it to a saltwater aquarium. The idea of bottom feeder in a saltwater aquarium is simply not necessary.

Most "waste" in saltwater is in the form of disolved organics in the water column. These organics do not settle on the bottom of the aquarium, but rather remain suspended until they are removed by the protein skimmer or become processed biologically. This can be visibly seen when looking at the amount of waste that accumulates in the protein skimmer daily, as compared to the minimal amount that builds up on the filter pads of your mechanical filter.

Some waste will naturally settle, such as decaying algae, foods, and solid fish waste, but this is minimal. It is even more unlikely in a fish only system, which when set up properly will have very strong mechanical filtration. The density of saltwater is very effective at keeping larger particles suspended in the water column until removed by the mechanical filter.

This concept can be disucussed in much further detail. In fact, this may be the biggest difference in freshwater theory vs. saltwater theory. In freshwater systems, the bottom feeders "eat" the waste, but in a closed system this waste is simply recycled back into the aquarium. In contrast, the protein skimmer on a saltwater system will actually remove the organic waste from the water. It is not biologically processed, and is not recycled into the water column.


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