Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   River Hatchet fish and Impaichtys Kerri (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/freshwater-tropical-fish/river-hatchet-fish-impaichtys-kerri-176722/)

Dovie 05-13-2013 02:37 PM

River Hatchet fish and Impaichtys Kerri
 
I have just introduced 2 Gasteropelecus Sternicula (Hatchet fish) to my tank and I have also added 3 Impaichtys Kerri. Does anyone have any advise concerning these fish.
I like the colors and my LFS said they would be OK with my 10 Neon Tetra, 3 female pregnant Guppys and a pair of Platy's with one 6 mm baby Platy.
So far they seem to have settled in nicely. The 3 Impaichtys Kerri just chase each other and the Hatchets keep to themself.
Dovie

Dovie 05-13-2013 03:16 PM

I have just found out that the Impaichtys Kerri are called Blue Emperor Tetra

Byron 05-15-2013 10:21 AM

I have kept both species. They will be fine with the other fish mentioned, but you do need larger groups of both.

The common Silver Hatchetfish is especially social. I would get at least 3 more for a total of 5. You don't mention the tank size, but they need swimming space as they are more active than the slightly smaller species in Carnegiella. They will come down into the water column much more frequently, chasing one another in what may seem to us to be games of tag and follow the leader; to the fish it is an integral part of their design which must be accommodated or they will not be in the best of health.

The Inpaichthys kerri or Kerri Tetra, often referred to as the Blue Emperor (though this species is not closely related aside from both being characins), also needs a group, and it is best to have an even mix of male/female. This is discernible easily by the colour of the adipose fin, as it mentions in our profile [click shaded name]. I would go for 7 or more, again if you have tank space...but a group of 6 is absolute minimum. This fish is also somewhat active, but not aggressively so. I have had them successfully spawn in my tanks an d some fry sometimes survived predation.

Byron.

Dovie 05-15-2013 12:09 PM

Thanks Byron,

I have 125 ltr (27 gal imp) tank 50x50x50 and its pretty full of plants which are growing like mad. I reset my tank about 2 months ago when I switched from goldfish to tropical, the water quality is good on all accounts. The 3 Inpaichthys kerri are chasing each other and the Silver Hatchetfish seem OK. though not particular active as you mentioned, but seem to hang around the surface and half way down.
I did have 4 Siamese algae eaters, took 3 back to the LFS but cant catch the other one, as soon as I put the net in it disappears into the plants. Not sure how to catch him.
I have one baby Platy as well I noticed it last weekend after a 4 day break, could be a couple of weeks old as its about 6-7 mm long.

Dovie

Byron 05-15-2013 12:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dovie (Post 2056410)
Thanks Byron,

I have 125 ltr (27 gal imp) tank 50x50x50 and its pretty full of plants which are growing like mad. I reset my tank about 2 months ago when I switched from goldfish to tropical, the water quality is good on all accounts. The 3 Inpaichthys kerri are chasing each other and the Silver Hatchetfish seem OK. though not particular active as you mentioned, but seem to hang around the surface and half way down.
I did have 4 Siamese algae eaters, took 3 back to the LFS but cant catch the other one, as soon as I put the net in it disappears into the plants. Not sure how to catch him.
I have one baby Platy as well I noticed it last weekend after a 4 day break, could be a couple of weeks old as its about 6-7 mm long.

Dovie

That's sufficient space in your tank to increase the groups. They both need it. I'll detail this a bit more for you.

Shoaling fish live in large groups for several reasons that I won't go into, except to say that they have evolved this way and it is an essential aspect of their well-being. Minimum numbers (six is usually suggested with most species, some differ) have scientific basis, as studies have now proven that all of these shoaling species will frequently develop problems in fewer numbers. Usually it is aggression, even among otherwise normally peaceful fish, but sometimes the fish responds by taking the opposite route, and sort of weakens away. Sometimes they seem to manage somehow, but of course we can't say they are actually in as good health as they would be with better numbers. So it is always best to provide as many as the situation allows. It is even better to slightly overstock the tank (when necessary) in order to achieve this, rather than having too few; the fish will be less healthy with fewer. Often this is not discernible until it is too late, and the fish just die. Stress is the cause, brought on by inappropriate conditions.

Hope this is useful.

Byron.

Dovie 05-15-2013 02:16 PM

Thanks for your input, I'll ad the extra fish as soon as I can.

Dovie


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