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Trey740 05-13-2013 08:15 AM

Baby Snails
 
I recently purchased live plants from my local pet store and put them into my respective 10 and 20 gallon high tank. Recently, while looking at the tank, I noticed that in both tanks there are what appears to be baby snails on the tank walls. I was shocked to see them in the 20 gallon because I have never had any snail in the tank (All I have are Rasbora and Tetra along with Cabomba and floating water sprite). The 10 gallon did have one mystery snail in it, but unfortunately the snail died (I don't think it really stood a chance as it wasn't in great condition from the store).

My question was, should I let them go and see what happens, or should I introduce some form of shells into the tank so that the snails can find a shell? If I can wait for this process, how long should I wait before introducing shells to them?

Thanks!

Geomancer 05-13-2013 08:41 AM

Snails grow their own shells, you do not have to provide them with one like a hermit crab ;)

These are likely 'pond' snails which many consider to be a pest snail. They are asexual which means they can (and will) reproduce on their own. Their numbers can quickly get out of hand if you have too much food available in the tank. They'll self limit their population to the available food.

A way to get rid of them, or simply reduce their numbers, is to put a piece of vegetable in, like lettuce or cucumber, and leave it there through the night. In the morning, before any lights get turned on, remove it and there should be a load of snails on it.

Byron 05-13-2013 10:33 AM

I would leave them alone. These small snails, be they pond/bladder snails or Malaysian
Livebearing, are very useful. The eat all organics (fish and plant waste) so it gets broken down faster by bacteria. And they can get everywhere to find it, which is something you can't. Consider them your friend and helper.

Byron.

jaysee 05-13-2013 10:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 2037114)
I would leave them alone. These small snails, be they pond/bladder snails or Malaysian
Livebearing, are very useful. The eat all organics (fish and plant waste) so it gets broken down faster by bacteria. And they can get everywhere to find it, which is something you can't. Consider them your friend and helper.

Byron.

Agreed 1000%. I've purposely put trumpet snails in all my tanks. People just focus on them with sand substrates, but they are an asset in gravel and bare bottom tanks as well.

Aside from their benefits, they will train you not to feed too much. Their population is directly related to the quantity of food available to them, so if there is a lot, you will have a lot. If there's a minimal amount, you will have a small colony. Maintaining a small colony is the mark of good feeding habits, in my opinion.


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Trey740 05-13-2013 02:25 PM

Thank you. I will try to get a picture of one so someone can let me know what kind they are.

I never intended to get rid of them, I actually like the snails in my other tank, so I just wanted to accommodate them.
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jaysee 05-13-2013 03:02 PM

If they have ice cream cone shaped shells, they are trumpet snails. You could also look up the pics of each to ID them. There are really only 3 kinds it could be - MTS, pond snails, or rams horn snails.

jentralala 05-13-2013 03:26 PM

Make sure to let us know, I'm curious to know what kind :)

Byron 05-13-2013 03:40 PM

3 Attachment(s)
Here are photos of the three "common" snails that jaysee mentioned. Malaysian Livebearing is top left, pond is top right, ramshorm is lower photo.

Trey740 05-13-2013 04:17 PM

Honestly, they are too small to even begin to decipher which shell that these snails have. I was trying to look at them, but they are really small. I have seen that I do in fact have three of them in my 20 gallon high as of now, so we'll see where it goes from here.

jaysee 05-13-2013 04:24 PM

sounds like pond snails. Baby trumpets are identifiable as such as soon as they are born.


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