Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/)
-   Freshwater Aquarium Equipment (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/freshwater-aquarium-equipment/)
-   -   Incadescant 6500k (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/freshwater-aquarium-equipment/incadescant-6500k-151113/)

fish keeper 2013 04-11-2013 10:26 PM

Incadescant 6500k
 
Any one know an incandescant 15 watt bulb that is 6500k or close to that? I need the compact screw in kinds.

Thanks in advance.

MoneyMitch 04-12-2013 05:12 AM

have you check lowes or homedepot?

Geomancer 04-12-2013 11:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fish keeper 2013 (Post 1725969)
Any one know an incandescant 15 watt bulb that is 6500k or close to that? I need the compact screw in kinds.

Thanks in advance.

I don't think incandescent even come in different color temperatures do they?

beaslbob 04-12-2013 11:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fish keeper 2013 (Post 1725969)
Any one know an incandescant 15 watt bulb that is 6500k or close to that? I need the compact screw in kinds.

Thanks in advance.


You mean the 6500k 15w compact flourescent spiral "pig tail" bulbs which are not incandescent but are designed to replace incandescent bulbs.

(FWIW incandescent bulbs are basically glowing wires the put out a whole range of frequescies or k values).

Wall mart at least the last time I checked has GE 6500k bulbs for like 2 for $8. They are in a blue bubble pack and say "6500" vertically down the side. Seems to work fine for me.


my .02

jentralala 04-12-2013 11:38 AM

You can use CFL bulbs, they should fit right in to an incandescent socket. I got the Sylvania brand from Home Depot, they work like a charm.

Mikaila31 04-12-2013 12:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beaslbob (Post 1730073)

(FWIW incandescent bulbs are basically glowing wires the put out a whole range of frequescies or k values).

Most lights emit a range of frequencies. Kelvin temperature does not refer to the nanometer wave spectrum emitted from the light emits but the over all color of the light. Most common household incandescent emit a low kelvin temperature in the 2,700-4,000 range. Which, IMO anyway, looks terrible over an aquarium since its a ugly yellow light.

beaslbob 04-12-2013 05:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mikaila31 (Post 1730785)
Most lights emit a range of frequencies. Kelvin temperature does not refer to the nanometer wave spectrum emitted from the light emits but the over all color of the light. Most common household incandescent emit a low kelvin temperature in the 2,700-4,000 range. Which, IMO anyway, looks terrible over an aquarium since its a ugly yellow light.


FWIW and from my memory the K values refers to the light given out by a black body heated to that temperature. Therefore the k value is very much tied to the wave length of the light. Or at least the light spectrum anyway.


owww heck I looked it up. :lol:

from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelvin

Quote:

Originally Posted by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelvin

Colour temperature
Main article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colour_temperature
See also: Stefan–Boltzmann constant
The kelvin is often used in the measure of the colour temperature of light sources. Colour temperature is based upon the principle that a black body radiator emits light whose colour depends on the temperature of the radiator. Black bodies with temperatures below about 4000 K appear reddish whereas those above about 7500 K appear bluish. Colour temperature is important in the fields of image projection and photography where a colour temperature of approximately 5600 K is required to match "daylight" film emulsions. In astronomy, the stellar classification of stars and their place on the Hertzsprung–Russell diagram are based, in part, upon their surface temperature, known as effective temperature. The photosphere of the Sun, for instance, has an effective temperature of 5778 K.


fish keeper 2013 04-12-2013 06:46 PM

I noticed that cfl 15w is equivilent to a 60w incadescant bulb... A little to bright for my 10 gallon. Are all flourescant lights this bright? Are the tubes this bright?

Also, I want to replace two 15w incandescant, so a 15w compact flourescant is probally not going to work (based on what I've seen). How many watts should I get?

Thanks for all the replies!

Quantum 04-12-2013 08:25 PM

it will work, just a lot more visible light than the true incandecent bulb


I've seen 40 watt equivalent ones (9-10 watt) in 6500K, I wouldn't expect two of those to be excessive, but it all depends on what you are hoping to accomplish, live plants? otherwise Kelvin rating/spectral distribution is largely irrelevant

fish keeper 2013 04-12-2013 09:20 PM

I'm looking at two 13 watt (60 watt equivelent) for my 10 gallon. So your saying its the same amount of light just more in visible light right? If so this should be good right?


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:12 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2