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-   -   Filtration question (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/filtration-question-131969/)

Blaxicanlatino 03-16-2013 10:31 PM

Filtration question
 
I have 2, 10 gallon tanks that are remarkable, and have many red cherry shrimp, fry, and scuds however im concerned that the power filter used on both tanks may be killing spawning. I put some mesh around the filter intake to keep small creatures from getting sucked inside but is there a better way of filtering the tank without hurting the animals?

also i have many plants in both tanks.

thanks :D

MoneyMitch 03-16-2013 10:44 PM

you could go down to just a sponge filter just to catch the debris, if you have enough plants you should be ok.

AbbeysDad 03-17-2013 08:12 AM


Blaxicanlatino 03-17-2013 08:25 PM

how do they work? ive only known powerfilters. I have many many plants though.

AbbeysDad 03-17-2013 10:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blaxicanlatino (Post 1472701)
how do they work? ive only known powerfilters. I have many many plants though.

They typically use an air pump that pumps air up through a venturi tube which [also] pulls water through a sponge. In function, this is not unlike the old school corner filter except it uses sponge instead of polyester fiber.
They can be useful, but have limitations and in most tanks the sponge will require cleaning every few days. They are relatively inexpensive and worth a try....but don't throw your current filter(s) away just yet. ;-)

Sanguinefox 03-17-2013 10:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blaxicanlatino (Post 1472701)
how do they work? ive only known powerfilters. I have many many plants though.

Sponge filters are usually connected either to an air pump (the stuff used to power bubblers) or to a power head. They pull water through the sponge which is supposed to colonize good bacteria. It can also do a decent job on minor mechanical filtration.

I have a big one running in my 80 gallon. Rated for 125 gallons and running off an airpump. Works great for my tank, though it's well planted.
EDIT: Though honestly I don't see why either tank needs a filter to begin with. So long as you have something causes the top level of water to bounce (such as a well placed airstone on the right setting) and lots of healthy plants including floaters you shouldn't need power filters. It's just shrimp in there right?

1077 03-18-2013 11:27 AM

#2 Oxygen plus biofilter would work well.(google)
Can extend the adjustable return tube or lower it to control suface disturbance.

Byron 03-18-2013 11:48 AM

I agree, a sponge-type filter is sufficient on planted tanks that are small. I use this on my 10g, 20g, 29g, and on my 33g I have an internal motor-driven sponge filter. The others are connected to an air pump.

I happen to like the Hagen Elite sponges filters, but the Hydro are good too, and are (from what I can see from the data on Foster&Smith) identical to the ones 1077 mentioned.

Byron.

Kuddos 2 U 03-18-2013 01:17 PM

To cover my filters, i just use a sponge that I bought for $2.00 at petsmart and it works great.

Blaxicanlatino 03-18-2013 08:46 PM

awesome thanks! so i buy these i assume?


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