Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   regarding lights (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/regarding-lights-131234/)

fish keeper 2013 03-09-2013 05:51 PM

regarding lights
 
I was reading Byron's article on lights (nice article by the way :-D) and I have a question. I would have posted it on the article but the article is relatively old and I wasn't sure anyone would see it. I currently keep my light on from 3:30 to 10:00 pm (because it looks good with the lights on at night). I have one plant, but it is java fern which requires low light. Also the room it is in recieves tons of indirect sunlight. So saying the sun rises at 7:00 am. than my tank will get a total of 15 hours. This number will get even higher in the summer. Is this too much? Should I change it to another time period?

Byron 03-09-2013 07:11 PM

Thank you for the kind words.:thankyou:

Java Fern does not like direct light that is bright; you will see brush algae attacking this plant, and it is impossible to deal with. I don't know the tank size nor the light specs, so I can't comment on whether it may be bright or dim. And, are you adding any fertilizers? If you can provide this data, I should be able to offer more.

Floating plants are ideal with Java Fern, plus you gain the additional benefit of fast growing plants (which JF is not, obviuosly).

Byron.

fish keeper 2013 03-09-2013 10:01 PM

Sorry, my tank is 10 gallons and the light is incandescant 15 watt. I wasn't really concerned about if it was too bright, just the fact that with my light the "sun" doesnt go away until 10 pm. Just wondering if that would be bad for my fish
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MoneyMitch 03-10-2013 12:03 AM

if i were you and your not seeing any problems right now i wouldnt change anything, only time i change things is when problems occur, yes its better to be proactive then reactive but theres a fine line with that in aquariums.

Byron 03-10-2013 12:16 PM

Agree. As for the light and fish, have a read of my article on this:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...er-fish-81982/

As it explains, provided you have a decent continuous period of complete darkness, and provided the "day" light isn't too bright, the fish don't care much. With plants, we use algae to guage the light.

Byron.

AbbeysDad 03-11-2013 09:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fish keeper 2013 (Post 1461841)
Sorry, my tank is 10 gallons and the light is incandescant 15 watt. I wasn't really concerned about if it was too bright, just the fact that with my light the "sun" doesnt go away until 10 pm. Just wondering if that would be bad for my fish
Posted via Mobile Device

Fish are very adaptable and once you have a 'canopy' of floating plants, the light intensity will be reduced.

beaslbob 03-11-2013 10:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fish keeper 2013 (Post 1461497)
I was reading Byron's article on lights (nice article by the way :-D) and I have a question. I would have posted it on the article but the article is relatively old and I wasn't sure anyone would see it. I currently keep my light on from 3:30 to 10:00 pm (because it looks good with the lights on at night). I have one plant, but it is java fern which requires low light. Also the room it is in recieves tons of indirect sunlight. So saying the sun rises at 7:00 am. than my tank will get a total of 15 hours. This number will get even higher in the summer. Is this too much? Should I change it to another time period?


IMHO it is very important to not necessairly follow some suggested formula especially those posted in this excellent board but by people who may have completely different tanks, setups, and experience.

What you do is really kind of simple. Increase the lighting (usually duration) until you get cloudiness and then cut back off to where the tank stays clear.

Sometimes you have to do that with feeding as well.


Of course if the plants and fish are happy to start with I wouldn't change anything.

That way you have the lighting for your specific situation.

But hey.

that's just my .02

1077 03-11-2013 11:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beaslbob (Post 1463753)
IMHO it is very important to not necessairly follow some suggested formula especially those posted in this excellent board but by people who may have completely different tanks, setups, and experience.

What you do is really kind of simple. Increase the lighting (usually duration) until you get cloudiness and then cut back off to where the tank stays clear.

Sometimes you have to do that with feeding as well.


Of course if the plants and fish are happy to start with I wouldn't change anything.

That way you have the lighting for your specific situation.

But hey.

that's just my .02


Do tell,,, after warning OP of accepting suggestion's, especially from this board/forum,,
What makes what you suggest better?:lol:
In my expierience,increasing the light duration often encourages algae with all but lowest lighting in non CO2 tank's with minimal planting,fish load,fertz.
If OP isn't seeing algae ,then perhap's between the relatively low light ,and partial indirect light from window,,they have it about right.
Can alway's shade the light from window,or move the small tank if and when problem arises.

funkman262 03-11-2013 12:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1077 (Post 1463789)
Do tell,,, after warning OP of accepting suggestion's, especially from this board/forum,,
What makes what you suggest better?:lol:

I was thinking the same thing but then I realized his advice is similar to setting up an adjustable heater. Instead of saying something along the lines of "I have a different heater and I just turn the dial 10 degrees from the right and the temperature is where I need it", it's like saying "Turn the dial up slowly until the light turns on indicating the heater is on, watch what temperature it reaches when the indicator light turns off, turn the dial slightly if it's not hot enough, and repeat." So it's more of a custom fit solution than one-size fits all.

Honestly though, for the OP's setup, very little light is required since the only plant in the tank is java fern. I'd be more inclined to reduce lighting in that setup than increase it. I can see beaslbob's advice being more applicable in a heavily planted tank though.

beaslbob 03-11-2013 12:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1077 (Post 1463789)
Do tell,,, after warning OP of accepting suggestion's, especially from this board/forum,,
What makes what you suggest better?:lol:

...

Yeppers. :lol:


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