Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   (UK) Fish-In-Cycle 240L 4ft Tank. (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/uk-fish-cycle-240l-4ft-tank-126380/)

Dawes 01-21-2013 12:21 PM

(UK) Fish-In-Cycle 240L 4ft Tank.
 
Starting a new Tank from fresh as I've recently upgraded from a much smaller Tank, and as I do not have the Filter media from the old Filtration unit, I have no way of obtaining my old culture (Which isn't a problem as I was quite fond of starting from scratch if I am honest).

I've been keeping fish for some time now, but was curious as to what list of fish are suitable for fish-in-cycles other than perhaps Danios.

It's a 240L Tank, with a Fluval 305 External Filter.

I'll be doing weekly water changes, and testing for my Water everyday/ every other day (As there is a store that tests the water right near where I work)


Water Quality according to my Supplier:

Hardness Level: Moderately Soft
Hardness Clark: 6.00
pH: 7.64

Byron 01-21-2013 03:50 PM

To be truthful, no fish are good as cycling fish. Ammonia and nitrite at very low levels (meaning, anything above zero using our basic test kits) will suffer damage. This may not lead to death now, but it has various impacts on the fish's physiology which does cause health problems that would otherwise likely be averted and a shorter than normal lifespan.

There are two ways to get around this. One is with live plants. With lots of fast-growing plants, and floating plants are ideal for this task, and a few fish initially, the tank will be fine and so will the fish. Plants take up ammonia/ammonium. The "cycle" will still occur but so minimally it has no impact on the fish provided they are few and the plants are fast growers; you will not be able to detect ammonia or nitrite with a test kit.

The second method is to seed the tank, and one of the bacterial supplements can do this. Dr. Tim's One and Only, Tetra's SafeStart, and Seachem's Stability are good for this. Here again, very few fish so as not to overwhelm the system.

In either method, slowly add the remaining fish over several days or weeks.

Byron.

Dawes 01-21-2013 07:18 PM

I'll be adding a nice thick layer of Duckweed, and if necessary quite a few plants. Along with frequent Water Changes. I might even invest in using Seachems Tapsafe, along with some Nutrafin Cycle. (Not sure how well the latter works, but I presume its better than nothing).

Could you technically Cycle with any Fish Species (To an extent) by the way?
I've always been curious as to why some people prefer/recommend certain types, such as Danios.

Byron 01-21-2013 07:37 PM

Quote:

I'll be adding a nice thick layer of Duckweed, and if necessary quite a few plants. Along with frequent Water Changes. I might even invest in using Seachems Tapsafe, along with some Nutrafin Cycle. (Not sure how well the latter works, but I presume its better than nothing).
Cycle will quicken the cycling some, but it is not as good as one of the three I mentioned. I have read scientific studies on this, on which findings I base my suggestions. And I have myself used Cycle and Stability so I know roughly how they help, to varying degrees.

I don't know what "Tap Safe" is, I did a Google search and couldn't pin it down. But water conditioners are not bacterial supplements, this is two very different things. I mentioned the three reliable supplements in my last post.

Quote:

Could you technically Cycle with any Fish Species (To an extent) by the way?
I've always been curious as to why some people prefer/recommend certain types, such as Danios.
You won't find many (perhaps no) members here who will recommend cycling with fish, unless you do what I mentioned previously; have lots of fast growing live plants or seed the tank.

All fish, no matter what the species, are harmed by being used to cycle without one of the fore-mentioned. While it is true that some fish are more resiliant (often called "hardy") than other fish to various things, the fact remains that all fish are harmed by ammonia and nitrite.

When you have the live plants, or seed the tank, a few fish can be added and they should not suffer damage. And here, yes, some are better than others. Some fish are more sensitive to various things, such as ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, medications, etc., than other fish.

But another poiint is that no fish should be put in a tank unless you want that fish in the tank permanently. So the first fish introduced, with live plants present for instance, should be something you want. And here, you would select a hardier fish.

Byron.

Dawes 01-21-2013 07:42 PM

Quote:

I don't know what "Tap Safe" is, I did a Google search and couldn't pin it down. But water conditioners are not bacterial supplements, this is two very different things. I mentioned the three reliable supplements in my last post.
I was referring to the Seachem Prime, as it apparently reduces Ammonia, etc.
(But is quite rare and hard to get ahold of here in the UK).
And aye, Water Conditioners are water conditioners, de-chlorinators, what have you, just Prime as stated before 'apparently' reduces said toxins.

I'll try get some of the stuff you mentioned however. Still in the planning stages yet.

Byron 01-21-2013 07:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dawes (Post 1399776)
I was referring to the Seachem Prime, as it apparently reduces Ammonia, etc.
(But is quite rare and hard to get ahold of here in the UK).
And aye, Water Conditioners are water conditioners, de-chlorinators, what have you, just Prime as stated before 'apparently' reduces said toxins.

I'll try get some of the stuff you mentioned however. Still in the planning stages yet.

Prime is a water conditioner, not a bacterial supplement. It will detoxify ammonia, nitrite and nitrate in the water, but is only effective for 24-48 hours, after which the ammonia, nitrite or nitrate return as toxins. Prime doesn't remove them, it binds them somehow, but temporarily.

In a new tank you still need to establish the proper bacteria, and that is what the supplements help to do.

Byron.

Dawes 01-21-2013 07:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 1399790)
Prime is a water conditioner, not a bacterial supplement. It will detoxify ammonia, nitrite and nitrate in the water, but is only effective for 24-48 hours, after which the ammonia, nitrite or nitrate return as toxins. Prime doesn't remove them, it binds them somehow, but temporarily.

In a new tank you still need to establish the proper bacteria, and that is what the supplements help to do.

Byron.

Aye, I'll be using Prime in conjunction with the Bacterial supplements. (Hopefully the mass of Duckweed will be of great benefit too, as I only intend to stock 1-2 fish for the first 4 months or so).
It will be better than nothing, even if it is only minimal (The Prime that is), Ive read alot of decent things about Seachem's Prime and other products, just a shame they are so difficult to get ahold of here in the UK. Heh.

Nilet699 01-22-2013 02:12 AM

I'm UK and I just order mine straight offline. Its around 15-20 for 500ml which is good to last you about 9years with only the one tank haha.
I actually found it in a world of water on Friday.....10 for 100ml....complete rip off!
Order it with seachem stability, and even some seachem flourish comprehensive while your at it for your plants, and it'll no doubt be free delivery if not already :-) the flourish is not relevant to your OP though.....

1077 01-22-2013 05:41 AM

Is possible to cycle a tank while at the same time enjoying fish, but requires very few,small lfish,sparse feeding's per volume of water. No harm to the fish occurs if done right, but many/most cannot maintain the discipline needed.( can describe how to if asked).
Have set up perhap's a hundred tank's in class room's in just such a way and used same fish over and over, or fry from original fish to cycle other tank's.
Were no plant's to speak of in these tank's, but plant's and lot's of em, would give more wiggle room.
Not a fan of crap sold in bottles that may or may not produce desired result's.
Would be wise to stock the tank heavily with plant's before considering placing fish in the tank, but many/most are more interested in fishes and skimp on plant's.
Too many fish,too large of fish,,too much food,and too few plant's is recipe for problem's from fish perspective plant's or no plant's.


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