Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   question while cycling, should flow be reduced? (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/aquaripure/question-while-cycling-should-flow-reduced-125362/)

jozwikjp 01-11-2013 02:14 PM

question while cycling, should flow be reduced?
 
While the unit is cycling should flow be reduced to 50 or 25% to help anaerobic bacteria growth?

I red under some circumstances nutrient can be added every other day at reduce amounts. Under what cirumstances would this be advised?

I currently have two units and have been slowly removing other biomedia over the last 5 weeks.

One is a large goldfish tank that produce a lot of waste.

The other is a 220gal heavily planted tropical tank which does not produce as much waste.

The nitrate readings I am getting from the effluent and the tanks seems about the same. I am guessing the flow is too high for the goldfish tank, and possibly the planted tank.

DKRST 01-11-2013 06:34 PM

No, more flow through a filter is better! The bacteria that do the vast majority of waste breakdown are aerobic, not anaerobic.
The changes in ammonia/nitrate/nitrite readings won't be detectable between the inflow and outflow.
Planted tanks may cycle "easier" since plants will help remove the nitrates/ammonia form the water.

I'm assuming you are using a canister? Regardless, most any typical aquarium filter is going to gradually, bacterially over time slowly break down waste. A filter is not an all-in-one sewage treatment plant where pristine water comes out one end of the system after a single pass through.

jozwikjp 01-11-2013 07:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DKRST (Post 1387054)
No, more flow through a filter is better! The bacteria that do the vast majority of waste breakdown are aerobic, not anaerobic.
The changes in ammonia/nitrate/nitrite readings won't be detectable between the inflow and outflow.
Planted tanks may cycle "easier" since plants will help remove the nitrates/ammonia form the water.

I'm assuming you are using a canister? Regardless, most any typical aquarium filter is going to gradually, bacterially over time slowly break down waste. A filter is not an all-in-one sewage treatment plant where pristine water comes out one end of the system after a single pass through.

Hi DKRST,
I was referring to cycling my aquaripure nitrate filters. Both my tanks are are fully cycled in regards to ammonia and nitrites. The aquaripure has a very slow drip rate for anaerobic bacteria to process nitrates. Too much flow can increase the oxygen level and kill the anaerobic bacteria in, though too low will likely kill the bacteria from nothing to eat. At least that was my understanding.

DKRST 01-12-2013 07:34 AM

oops! I should probably pay attention to the thread section I'm in before replying!
My apologies, I didn't realize I was posting in the aquaipure sections. Please disregard my comments since they are obviously not relevant to your post :oops:


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