Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   longstanding finrot problem (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/tropical-fish-diseases/longstanding-finrot-problem-123795/)

dorabaker 12-27-2012 09:03 PM

longstanding finrot problem
 
I suppose I ought to start this post with some background on my tank and fishkeeping skills before anything else, since it's highly likely people who haven't been following my discussions on this site over the years may read this post.

Tank size: 15 gallons
established since: June 2010
temp: 26 C
pH: around 6.5
kH, nitrate/nitrite/ammonia levels: unknown since I can't afford test kits, however a dip strip nitrate/nitrite/ammonia test kit which I bought a while ago indicated zero of any of those toxins
Substrate: fairly standard gravel
Decor: 2 pieces of wood which I collected myself many years ago and have used in various tanks since (after thorough boiling and washing), Lots of live plants!, Various rocks and stones I've collected
Filtration: Homemade - very, very gentle filtration made out of an airstone and some filter wool tied to the plastic insert-thingy from a breeding trap.
Current inhabitants: 8 cherry barbs, 5 glowlight tetras, 1 bristlenose pleco

Some background history of my tank: Until relatively recently, I've actually been quite lazy with water changes, but having learnt my lesson and lost quite a lot of fish due to poor maintenance, I now do weekly water changes of about 25% (siphoning the gravel as much as possible at the same time), and since getting some new fish a few weeks ago I've even been doing twice-weekly water changes to offset the increased bioload.

I've had various numbers of glowlight tetras and cherry barbs for a long time now, and they have all suffered from chronic mild finrot which I can't seem to find an explanation for. At one point I noticed they seemed to get it after a water change, and realised that I was replacing the water with FREEZING water straight out of the tap which was stressing them out.

Since then I've always added warm water to equalise the temperature. I used to have to treat the tank with Myxazin in order for the fins to grow back, but since I've been taking more care with the water temperature the finrot hasn't been serious enough for me to feel justified in doing this, especially since even at half dose the medication really stresses out the fish. In any case, I've run out of Myxazin and it was very expensive, so I'm not rushing off to the shop to buy more.

However, the finrot hasn't completely abated. For example, one of my glowlight tetras has had finrot for ages (although none of the others appear to be suffering), and since I added the new fish a few weeks ago a couple of them have come down with it too. I added 6 cherry barbs and a bristlenose.

I can't think of any point when NONE of my shoaling fish have had finrot. I'm afraid this may have something to do with the fact that they've always been quite nippy, and if one of the fish gets a broken fin, they get picked on and the wound can't heal. I've discussed my fin-nipping problems in many posts on this site.

One possible reason that's been discussed is that my tank is just a bit too small for such active fish to feel comfortable in, and hence they take it out on each other. Another reason could be having too few shoaling fish; however I discovered that my glowlight tetras became much more peaceful after some of them had died, leaving a group of just 5.
Other people have told me that their glowlight tetras are just as nippy in a much bigger aquarium. I think it's just in their nature; I've noticed only the males fight among themselves, appearing to compete for dominance, while the females occasionally get caught up in a fight but rarely go looking for trouble. I've observed exactly the same thing in my cherry barbs.

Anyway, I'm starting to get worried now because I've realised the bristlenose is missing a bit of his tail, although it doesn't have the white fuzzy edge that characterises finrot, so it could simply be a tear. Nevertheless, any injury presents an opportunity for infection :-? What do you think I should do? Would it be worth trying to treat the finrot with medication, or should I just keep doing water changes and hope that it fixes itself up? I'm worried that the fish's fins aren't getting a chance to heal because they keep nipping at each other.

P.S. Incidentally, although I tried to pick only the healthiest barbs, two of them are 'runts' and I'm keeping an eye on them and praying they won't die, since they seem very weak despite showing no external signs of illness other than being small and scared. I'm not sure why there are always runts in batches of shoaling fish. Thoughts? Anything I can do to help them?

squishylittlefishies 12-27-2012 09:57 PM

I would say that your problem is water quality, and yes, the nipping. Water quality is a very common reason for finrot. Take a sample of you water and go to your pet store. They should be able to test it for you. I know petsmart will! If this is not the problem, I would just say theyre getting nipped at and possibly infected. Thanks for the good thorough post!

dorabaker 12-27-2012 10:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by squishylittlefishies (Post 1364790)
I would say that your problem is water quality, and yes, the nipping. Water quality is a very common reason for finrot. Take a sample of you water and go to your pet store. They should be able to test it for you. I know petsmart will! If this is not the problem, I would just say theyre getting nipped at and possibly infected. Thanks for the good thorough post!

I'm in Australia, and maybe things are different over in the USA, but I have a feeling (although I've never asked, so I don't know for sure) that none of my local fish stores will do anything like that for free, if at all.
But I might be wrong. Just a little nervous to ask! If it was something they offered, I would have thought it would be advertised?

Nilet699 12-27-2012 11:12 PM

I'm in the UK, so we're pretty much the same just a little less convicty :-) I've Never seen an advertisement anywhere in any LFS for free water testing but I know that each and every one of them do it. I have friends and know people on here who have Never tested their own water in years of keeping fish as they always get the shop to do it for them.

Take your water in, I'm sure they won't be at all surprised to see you ask.

charlie1881 12-31-2012 01:38 PM

Okay few questions in there I'm gonna see if I can get'em all ,lol.

Fin rot : - It is highly contagious bacterial infection that in its advanced stages can erode fins and tail all the way to the fishes body .
Bad water quality and fin injuries are the usually the main cause of this disease , and fin rot is usually followed up by a secondary fungal infection .

The best thing for the rot is a proprietary med for fin rot , as well as aquarium salt . Frequent water changes are a must to get rid of the disease asthey are necessary to improve water conditions.
You really need to get a seperate tank for the ''nippers'' , as long as they are in the tank the fins dont get the chanmce to heal proper and the rot will remain active .
I hope this helps ,
God bless

Oh and dont forget to get that water tested its the most important thing , you gotta know what you got to be able to fix it ;-)

dorabaker 12-31-2012 05:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by charlie1881 (Post 1371099)
The best thing for the rot is a proprietary med for fin rot , as well as aquarium salt . Frequent water changes are a must to get rid of the disease asthey are necessary to improve water conditions.
You really need to get a seperate tank for the ''nippers'' , as long as they are in the tank the fins dont get the chanmce to heal proper and the rot will remain active .

I don't have another tank set up at the moment, and I feel like if I try to do anything like adding meds or moving fish, I'll just stress them out more and actually make things worse. The situation is nowhere near that serious. My fish have been getting MILD finrot for years without recovering, but also without getting much worse or succumbing to fungus. They don't seem bothered at all, and I even noticed that the tailfin of my glowlight who has been suffering from finrot for a while has started to grow back.

I'll keep doing water changes, but I think the problem is actually just the nipping. There's not much I can do about that; moving the nippers out so the victims can recover won't make any difference in the long term. Maybe I just need to stop worrying and trust that my fishies will never actually do each other any serious harm. thanks for trying to help though :)


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