Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   New BioCube 29 (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-saltwater-aquariums/new-biocube-29-a-123611/)

RichCotte 12-25-2012 07:01 PM

New BioCube 29
 
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Hello everyone. I'm brand new to all this, so any help anyone can offer will be greatly appreciated. I've been wanting a SW aquarium for years and just got one from my fiancee for Christmas.

It's a Bio Cube 29 PC/LED. Iv'e started it off with 40 lbs of live sand and 9 lbs of H2Ocean Pro+ Salt.

As you can see in the photo, it's still very hazy. I placed a small plastic plant in the back to gauge visibility over the next few days.

Next step is to hit the books and do some research so I can decide which direction I want to head and what type of environment I want to end up with. Right now, I'm thinking a small reef environment with a couple fish, but not sure what species yet.

Benm1020 12-25-2012 08:03 PM

Hello, i just have set up a jbj 28 which is almost the same, you are going to need live rock for biological filtration. You will need close to 30 or so lbs of live rock to provide enough surface area for bacteria (good bacteria) to grow. Im sure reefing madness will come on here and give his normal quickstart guide.
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Reefing Madness 12-25-2012 08:20 PM

Ask and you shall receive. I tried to make this as simple as possible. Any questions, fire any.

#1-Dry Rock, there are a few hitchhikers on Live Rock that people want to stay away from, so they opt for using Dry Rock, or Dead Rock. Macro Rock is a good place to start looking for that. Either way you go you will need a minimum of 1lb per gallon.

#2-Replacement filter media like filter floss and activated carbon (if you get a filter) Which is really not necessary.

#3-Multiple Power heads (2 or 3) 10x your water volume for just a Fish Only With Live Rock, and at least 20x your water volume for a Reef Tank. So lets say your going reef, and you have a 100g tank, you would need flow in that tank at minimum of 2000gph, or 2 1000gph power heads.

#4-Protein Skimmer, rated at 2 times your water volume. Unless your tank is under 30g, in which case you can do 10% water changes a week to rid the system of detrius. But, you'll have to watch the water parameters close, if things go haywire, you'll have to do more water changes.

#5-Saltwater Test Kits. Reef Test Kit. Test for Ammonia, Nitrites, Nitrates, PH, Phosphates, Calcium, ALK and Magnesium.

#6-Saltwater fish food. Mysis Shrimp, Squid, Cyclopease, Algae Sheets, Romaine . Flake food is not really a good food to feed your marine fish.

#7-Aquarium vacuum. This one is iffy. Most don't use one, if you have enough flow in the tank you won’t need one

#8-Rubber kitchen gloves

#9-Fish net

#10-Two, clean, never used before, 5-gallon buckets

#11-Aquarium thermometer, digital being the best.

#12-Brush with plastic bristles (old tooth brush) - needed for cleaning the live rock if you don't get Fully Cured Live Rock.

#13-Power Strip, possibly GFCI outlets by the tank.

#14-Optional but definitely recommend getting a Reverse Osmosis or RO/Deionization filter for the make-up water, and a barrel for storing the water.

#15-Possibly a Quarantine Tank for your new fish. They sit in here for a few weeks to kill off parasites and bacteria, to keep it from getting in your main tank

#16-Heater rated for your size tank.

#17-Saltwater Mix. Marine Salt. Instant Ocean is the cheap Salt that beginners and Advanced use alike.

#18-Saltwater Hydrometer or even better a Refractometer, which is more accurate. There is also a Digital Meter that is way advanced if you have the cash.

#19-Aquarium filter (not absolutely necessary if running with adequate amounts of live rock, but nice to have if you need to use a mechanical filter or activated carbon, or GFO and such)

#20-Aquarium substrate such as live sand or crushed coral. Some go bare Bottom, others choose the 2-3" bottom, others, more advanced will try the Deep Sand Bed, which is over 6" deep.

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Fish & Aquarium Supplies: Marine Substrates, Sand, Crushed Coral, Live Sand

Aquarium Lighting, Light Information; Reef & Planted, PAR, Watt, Kelvin.

http://live-plants.com/

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RichCotte 12-25-2012 08:38 PM

Thanks
 
Thanks for the comments and help. I can't wait to really get started. Of course everything is closed today, so will have to wait til tomorrow to get out and buy the live rock.

Benm1020 12-25-2012 09:34 PM

I would not buy all live rock because it gets really expensive around $8 a pound, i would get 10 lbs of liverock then the rest dry rock or do all dry rock, but if you have the money and cant wait you can get all live rock and it will cycle in less than a week
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Reefing Madness 12-25-2012 09:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Benm1020 (Post 1362168)
I would not buy all live rock because it gets really expensive around $8 a pound, i would get 10 lbs of liverock then the rest dry rock or do all dry rock, but if you have the money and cant wait you can get all live rock and it will cycle in less than a week
Posted via Mobile Device

It has to be all Fully Cured Live Rock, in order for the tank to cycle in a few days.

RichCotte 12-25-2012 11:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Reefing Madness (Post 1362182)
It has to be all Fully Cured Live Rock, in order for the tank to cycle in a few days.

What if I'm not in a hurry? If I don't need it to cycle fast, just want it to cycle right? Is it worth spending the extra money or should I do the partial live, partial dry?

Reefing Madness 12-26-2012 09:47 AM

Not worth it in my book. There are so many cool things that come on Live Rock, but there are some horrible things that will make you pull your hair out. I'd just go with all Macro or Dry rock. You can bring home stuff to add to the tank, that you really want in there instead of wakingup one morning and screaming.

MetalArm3 12-26-2012 10:54 AM

There is also Eco-Friendly "man made" rock that comes fully cured with no hitch hikers. I try to to lessen the human impact has on the environment, especially in such a great hobby. That goes along with captive raised fish and coral propagation.

http://www.liveaquaria.com/product/prod_display.cfm?c=393+3122&pcatid=3122

MetalArm3
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Reefing Madness 12-26-2012 11:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MetalArm3 (Post 1362608)
There is also Eco-Friendly "man made" rock that comes fully cured with no hitch hikers. I try to to lessen the human impact has on the environment, especially in such a great hobby. That goes along with captive raised fish and coral propagation.

Live Rock for Coral Reef Aquariums: "Real Reef" Eco Friendly Live Rock - Fully Cured

MetalArm3
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Live Rock for Coral Reef Aquariums: "Real Reef" Eco Friendly Live Rock - Fully Cured

For the Cost, I'd still go with Macro Rocks:
http://www.marcorocks.com/


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