Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Rookie Mistake; fish are all dying (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/tropical-fish-diseases/rookie-mistake-fish-all-dying-123145/)

etanico 12-19-2012 09:12 PM

Rookie Mistake; fish are all dying
 
(zebra danios in 20 gal tank)

Please don't lynch me, guys. I was impatient and now I've lost four fish because of it. I made the classic mistake. The dumbest one in the book.
I bought three new fish and put them in my tank of two almost immediately.

They've slowly been dying off, without even showing clear signs of illness. I have no idea what to do, or how to fix this situation.

I've begun decontaminating everything in the tank by removing and scrubbing. I set up a quarantine tank and put the newer of the remaining two fish inside of it. The older fish is still in the tank which has only gravel and a plant. My question is whether or not I should put them both together in the qt tank and finish scrubbing down the older tank.

Again, I'm sorry for my ignorance. I'm really not looking for a lecture. I just need to know what to do to keep these fish alive.

I can include pictures of the most recently deceased fish if needed.

Granberry 12-19-2012 09:28 PM

First off, don't beat yourself up too bad. We have all made that rookie mistake. When it comes to fish, we're often as impatient as kids on Christmas. :)

Secondly, you'll need to post your water parameters for folks to chime in on what went wrong. It very well may not have been ammonia poisoning (which is what fish usually die from when you add them to your tank before it cycles, though if your ammonia is 0, then maybe nitrates). Maybe they were unhealthy, maybe you did something wrong with the water such as used tap water without dechlorinating it or otherwise used inappropriate water.

The people on this board are really helpful and educated. I'm not one of them, but I can offer condolences with the best of them. :)

etanico 12-19-2012 09:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Granberry (Post 1355511)
First off, don't beat yourself up too bad. We have all made that rookie mistake. When it comes to fish, we're often as impatient as kids on Christmas. :)

Secondly, you'll need to post your water parameters for folks to chime in on what went wrong. It very well may not have been ammonia poisoning (which is what fish usually die from when you add them to your tank before it cycles, though if your ammonia is 0, then maybe nitrates). Maybe they were unhealthy, maybe you did something wrong with the water such as used tap water without dechlorinating it or otherwise used inappropriate water.

The people on this board are really helpful and educated. I'm not one of them, but I can offer condolences with the best of them. :)

The other issue is that I've been too cheap to buy a water testing kit, so I should probably get on that.

Thank you so much for making me feel less ignorant!

Bluewind 12-20-2012 01:06 AM

Like Gran said, we all goof up when we first start off. I've only been doing it since October and God knows I've made my share! :lol:

When it comes to testing kits, you can't get cheeper or better than the API Mater Test Kit which sells on Amazon for like $20! It has a test in it for just about anything you can thing of and the test tubes make me feel all sciency! Being a total nerd, I have fun doing it 8-)

There are a million things that could be going on, so before you do something drastic, it's best to figure out exactly what's going on. The water could be too hard, the pH too hight or low, the temp could be off, they could have a disease like velvet or Ick, there could be too much amonia, your water treatment could be bad, your substrate could not be innert and causing spikes, or a million other things! The only way to figure out what it is is ruling out what it is not. ;-)
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1077 12-20-2012 06:08 AM

Noticed in some of your old thread's/post's that you set up a new tank in July of this year.
Is this tank or a friend's tank still active? Can borrow some used filter material?
No need to "cycle" another tank if you know of one that is currently running with fish.

marshallsea 12-23-2012 03:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by etanico (Post 1355488)
(zebra danios in 20 gal tank)

Please don't lynch me, guys. I was impatient and now I've lost four fish because of it. I made the classic mistake. The dumbest one in the book.
I bought three new fish and put them in my tank of two almost immediately.

They've slowly been dying off, without even showing clear signs of illness. I have no idea what to do, or how to fix this situation.

I've begun decontaminating everything in the tank by removing and scrubbing. I set up a quarantine tank and put the newer of the remaining two fish inside of it. The older fish is still in the tank which has only gravel and a plant. My question is whether or not I should put them both together in the qt tank and finish scrubbing down the older tank.

Again, I'm sorry for my ignorance. I'm really not looking for a lecture. I just need to know what to do to keep these fish alive.

I can include pictures of the most recently deceased fish if needed.

If this is a new tank then it's probably not cycled and you have ammonia in your tank. Do daily water changes to remove ammonia until it has cycled. If it's a cycled tank the decontaminating killed your beneficial bacteria and you need to do daily water changes until your tank has cycled. What are your water parameters?


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