Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   10G to a 65G and some other q's. (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/10g-65g-some-other-qs-121765/)

Ehlectric 12-04-2012 12:55 AM

10G to a 65G and some other q's.
 
Hey everyone!

So.. I've made the jump to the big tanks. A 65G was the biggest I could get in order to fit, unless I wanted to pay for a custom tank (no thanks). So I'm buying everything used for $140. Yes you read that correctly $140, no problems that I am aware of. Anything specific that I should be looking for when buying used? It can hold water and I'm not to worried as the seller seems to know what they were doing.

Anyways, second question. The 10G that I have at school with me, since I am leaving for a month (Christmas break) so should I take it home with me and use the 10G as a sump or is it worth bringing back? My friend is going to put my fish in his 55G while we set up the new one.

Final thing, I'm going with a freshwater planted. I've read that I can just use pool filter sand as its heavier than play sand and will work better. Not the biggest fan of gravel and paying 7 bucks for 5lbs of sand / gravel either, when I can get 60lbs for 15.


Thanks guys! Appreciate it.

TL;DR: Q1 - What to look for in used tank buying?
Q2: How to use a 10G as a sump.
Q3: Pool filter sand vs other.

Geomancer 12-04-2012 06:31 AM

Check the seals for signs of cracking, and of course the glass for any cracks. Otherwise ... what else is there to look at in a glass box? ;)

Maybe scrub it out with a vinegar/water mixture and be sure to rinse well.

A 10g would be a pretty small sump, and you're looking at lots of cash to get that all set up. Personally, it wouldn't be worth it for me, I'd rather just get a canister. Unless that 65g is already drilled and plumbed for a sump (and if it was a salt water tank, cleaning it out real well is a must to get ride of all the salt residue).

There is no difference between pool filter sand and play sand, they are both just pulverized rocks (Crystaline silica, aka quartz). They may be different grain sizes though. Just be sure it isn't white, you don't want a bright substrate.

jeaninel 12-04-2012 08:55 AM

Bring that 10 gallon home and use it as a QT/hospital tank. You will kick yourself later if you don't.

I use playsand and have no problems with it floating/clouding at all. One thing to watch for when using pool filter sand is that it may be sharper so if you have cories or loaches playsand may be better.
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lakemalawifish 12-04-2012 09:21 AM

Agree with all of the above! But my experience with play sand, it has to be rinsed 100 times before the water turns clear. I am exaggerating of course but it is the dirtiest sand I have ever worked with. I have it in my 46 g bow front breeder tank and I love it (wanted to try it because it matches the actual color of the sand at Lake Malawi) BUT! it offers no ph buffer so I had to include lots of limestone rock. With your tank, as far as plants (and I have zero knowledge of planted tanks) the only thing I can add is play sand is very light weight once it's in the water. It may feel heavy and hard in the bucket, but once you get it in the tank it is extremely lightweight and takes an experienced tank cleaner with the siphon to keep it from sucking up and out of the tank with the water. Not sure it would be good for plants.

Geomancer 12-04-2012 09:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lakemalawifish (Post 1337195)
It may feel heavy and hard in the bucket, but once you get it in the tank it is extremely lightweight and takes an experienced tank cleaner with the siphon to keep it from sucking up and out of the tank with the water. Not sure it would be good for plants.

Play sand is fantastic for plants, ideal even. Very easy for the fine roots of plants to root around, and take hold.

In a planted tank you just, at most, hover over the surface with the siphon. You do not dig into the substrate (you would just suck up sand and, and more importantly you would disturbe and/or damage roots).

lakemalawifish 12-04-2012 11:09 AM

Thanks for the info even though I am not a planted tank person :) Our African's would demolish any plant in their path. I am really surprised that it works well for planted tanks and will pass this info along to my plant friends, it's definitely priced right :)

Geomancer 12-04-2012 12:07 PM

Both of these tanks are Playsand from Home Depot.

125g
http://i139.photobucket.com/albums/q...2012_small.jpg

10g
http://i139.photobucket.com/albums/q...n_04052012.jpg

Ehlectric 12-04-2012 12:50 PM

Awesome, thanks guys. I really don't understand why aquarium sand costs 20 bucks for 20 pounds, when I can pay 7 bucks for 60 pounds haha.

Now, would you guys have any fish suggestions?

lakemalawifish 12-04-2012 02:03 PM

Very nice planted tanks! Thanks for the pics :)

Geomancer 12-04-2012 03:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ehlectric (Post 1337403)
Awesome, thanks guys. I really don't understand why aquarium sand costs 20 bucks for 20 pounds, when I can pay 7 bucks for 60 pounds haha.

Now, would you guys have any fish suggestions?

Usually it is a much cleaner sand. With play sand you have to spend significant time cleaning it to get all the dirt out, otherwise you'll have dark brown water that you can't even see an inch through.

As they say, time is money, but I prefer to keep the money ;)


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