Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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Ehlectric 12-02-2012 09:25 PM

Hey everyone!
 
Hey there.

Names Alex. I've been keeping an aquarium at home for about a year and a bit. (Small 10G) and I've brought it up to school with me now. I'm currently looking to a 90G (I can get one used for a pretty good price) or more realistically a 55G for home. Is that too big of a jump to make? I have a couple friends who have closer to the 55G and it doesn't seem too bad to take care of.

Anyways, I'll be asking some questions on here and trying to help out!

Cheers,

Alex

Reefing Madness 12-02-2012 10:03 PM

http://i259.photobucket.com/albums/h..._greet_100.gif

Canadian Fish 12-02-2012 10:58 PM

http://img222.imageshack.us/img222/4...bubblfshe0.gif

Welcome from Ottawa!

Get the 90 if it is affordable and you have the space!

55 is a great size, I love my 55s, accessories and equipment are still affordable at that size, lots of different fish are suitable for a 4 ft tank.

But the bigger the better, so get the biggest you can afford and can fit in your space. Otherwise you'll probably just wish you had later. It's a common theme around here.

fish joey 12-04-2012 06:02 PM

Bigger is better ! Welcome to TFK :-D

eaturbyfill 12-09-2012 12:11 AM

Hello and welcome to the forum! :-D

ChuckinMA 12-09-2012 04:50 AM

If you've mastered the basics with the 10g, which it sounds like you have after 12 + months, then the jump up shouldn't be an issue. Plan out which fish to stock ahead of time rather than spur of the moment at the LFS and you should be fine. You mentioned the tank would be at home although you're in school. Is it reasonably close by so tending to the tank won't be an issue?

Have fun!

SeaHorse 12-09-2012 10:55 AM

If you are looking at a 48" tank, you can look at 75 or 90.. I think the height is the main difference. It depends on what you are thinking of putting in it to help you decide. If you want fully planted then the deeper tank will need stronger/more lighting, ie more cost. Should you decide to go SW some day the 75 is cheaper to convert too.
Maybe none of this matters but they are things to consider (especially if you are very new to fish keeping and reading this thread). Having said that, the larger the tank, the more options you have for the fish you might like to keep, although unless one goes from 48" to 72 inches, (4' to 6') it restricts what you can keep long term.
I would say that the bigger tanks are easier to care for, but exponentially more costly. Bigger filters, more lights, more gravel, more plants, rocks.... etc. As for care, things happen slower in more water. Consider a drop of food coloring in a glass of water, vs the ten gallon tank. It diffuses more, less effect, slower reactions. This is why smaller tanks fail so easily. They get overstocked easily and too much ammonia builds up leading to loss of fish.
Looking forward to hearing what you choose to get!!

Canadian Fish 12-11-2012 04:04 PM

I think the 75 and 90 are wider then the 55 too, which is nice. 55s aren't that wide. Though they're still my favorite size, obviously bigger is always better.

ChuckinMA 12-11-2012 06:23 PM

Since I'm planning on upgrading, I actually know the dimensions! The 55 gallon is typically 48" (side to side) x 12 3/4" (front to back) and the 75 is 48" x 18". The 90 has the same foot print as a 75, but is taller. Hope that helps.


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