Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/)
-   Beginner Freshwater Aquarium (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/)
-   -   black hair algae (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/black-hair-algae-119869/)

bmsingl 11-15-2012 12:08 PM

black hair algae
 
i made a mistake by upgrading to 125 gallon from a 65 gallon tank. the 65 was heavily planted and doing great. i switched from gravel to sand. what i did was add large rocks that were used in the 125. i never washed them off and they hada green algae on them. well here i am a month later and all my plants are covered in black hair algae. i need advice about how to get rid of this thats not gonna be drastic to the fish i have.

Cole mccallister 11-15-2012 12:27 PM

Well consider adding mollies they love algae truth be told they can never get enough of the stuff any thing with any algae = buffeat for mollies again they are the soulution no chems needed they can do even fragile plants with out making any damage;-) also you can continue your usual regumene without changeing a thing with them so... just put them in and watch the magic.

Byron 11-15-2012 02:51 PM

I moved this thread out of the old one to start its own. While the topic is connected, it is not directly related to the other problem, so it is best as a new thread. More members are likely to see it too.

To the issue, as I commented in the other thread, brush algae can be controlled mainly by light. If the light is not above what the plants can use, in intensity and duration, algae doesn't have the advantage. But before I can suggest dealing with the light, I need to know what you have in terms of the light (please be specific, include the type, number of tubes, watts, and duration). Also, what if any fertilization is being added, and how often. As tank size is important too, I will assume a 5 foot tank unless you indicate differently.

While acquiring fish to eat algae can sometimes be helpful, this can impact on the tank's biology, not be compatible with existing fish or water parameters, etc. Plus, "algae" eating fish are usually very particular in what types of algae they will eat. There are only two fish that will eat brush algae that I am aware of, and both get large and have other issues. It is always preferable to deal with the cause.

Byron.


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