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Alexis 11-03-2006 03:00 PM

Need help with 5 gal planted project With CRS
 
Here's the plan. It's a 5 gallon hex Eclipse knock-off tank
List of stuff:
Decent light bulb
Pc of sponge for intake
plants
DIY CO2
fertilizer type of substrate
small pc of driftwood
CRS
and maybe a Betta.
Nothing else.

Here are the things I need help with...

1. How many shrimp comfortably?
2. Will the CO2 be harmful to the shrimp?
3. How do you do a substrate vac without potentially vacuuming up infant shrimp?
4. Is there anything really wrong with this idea?

bettababy 11-03-2006 03:37 PM

I see nothing wrong with your idea, just watch not to overdo the CO2. In that size tank I wouldn't put more than 6 of the cherry shrimp, due to food supply. I also would be careful about when to add them, since they will need a food supply to sustain them and algae is their primary food source. A new tank will have little to no algae growth.
When setting up a tank such as this, I suggest waiting about 4 - 6 weeks before adding the shrimp to allow for food supply build up.
If the nutrient level is kept low, there may be no need for any gravel vac'ing to be done.
I currently have a 20 gallon planted tank set up and the last time I tried to do a gravel vac, the water came up clear... there was nothing to vac.
Just don't over feed and you should be good with water changes only, leave the gravel alone all together.
If you find the need to do a gravel vac, I'd try using a piece of rigid air tubing (like is used for UG) and a piece of flexible airline tubing to run your siphon from. This will give you more control about what you suck up, and also how much force is created with the siphon. Keep the tank well let while doing it, and just be on the lookout for baby shrimp. If you siphon into a bucket instead of down the drain, you can then let the water settle and use a flashlight to look for any stray shrimps that might have been accidentally sucked up, and then you can easily put them back into the tank before dumping the water. I use this method when cleaning betta fry tanks, and so far so good, I haven't lost one yet.

SimplySplendid 11-03-2006 03:56 PM

I assume you are going to breed them...?

Quote:

1. How many shrimp comfortably?
Try starting with about 5-10. Shrimp are not aggresive at all so you shouldn't have any problems. Make sure to provide LOTS of plants for babies to hide in.

Quote:

2. Will the CO2 be harmful to the shrimp?
Nope. It is actually good for them as it helps lower pH, and shrimps like the lower pH.

Quote:

3. How do you do a substrate vac without potentially vacuuming up infant shrimp?
Buy a brine shrimp net and put it around your vacuum tube. Keep a light on so you can see where the shrimps are.

Hope all goes well! :)
Brie

Alexis 11-03-2006 04:53 PM

Thanks guys!

crazie.eddie 11-03-2006 07:00 PM

I keep a shrimp tank, which includes RCS (Red Cherry Shrimp), which are easy to keep. I do not gravel vac the substrate at all, but just perform water changes. Many shrimp keepers do the same. Shrimps are detrivores, so will help in cleaning the substrate. Basically, dead plant matter = shrimp food.

Regarding CRS (Crystal Red Shrimp). They are more sensitive to water conditions and prefer softer water when breeding. A would not advise adding a betta to a shrimp tank, becuase the shrimps are small, especially juveniles. At the cost of CRS, they would make VERY EXPENSIVE betta food. I believe "C" grade CRS can sell as cheap as $25 (USD) per shrimp.

Generally, they state 2 shrimps per gallon, but since your tank is taller, with not much surface area for the shrimp, I suggest 5-6 or so, as Bettababy suggested.

Alexis 01-09-2007 11:39 AM

Well, it is now January.
I started with 5 shrimp and some plants planted in a peat moss and potting soil mixture with gravel over it.
One hunk of driftwood, and a sponge over the intake.

I ignored the advice given about waiting for a food supply to build up since the breeder I bought the shrimp from poo-pooed that idea--it didn't make too much sense to me either. When you pay nearly two bucks a shrimp, why leave a food source to chance? I feed shrimp pellets and algea wafers.

I now have shrimp coming out of my ears and my butt.

Does anyone know the growth rate on these things?

fish_4_all 01-09-2007 11:23 PM

Growth rates will depend on a couple factors. The first is size of the tank as most psecies will slow gorwth rates to accomodate to the trhie suroundings. The sceond is food, this shouldn't be an issue as you have stated. The last is how crowded they are. If oyu already have them coing out your ears then they will need a larger tank or they will start to overpopulate the tank.

I have seen that they can reach adult in as little as 4 months in the right conditions. I would think about a larger tank for the numbers you are talking about if you want to grow most out to adult.

Alexis 01-10-2007 11:31 AM

Thanks, that's about what I figured.

I have them in a 10, I have them in a 5, I have them everywhere. At this point, even though they're not cheap, they're about to become Discus treats...

fish_4_all 01-10-2007 11:40 AM

When it warms up you will be able to sell them fairly easily. I know if I had a tank set up that I would be looking to get some. Will make good food for your discus, always a good option especially when you such great success, congrats and keep up the good work.

Jaysn 01-10-2007 01:16 PM

I wish I could find some here. Any idea if they would survive shipping to NM?


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