Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Green Algae (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/green-algae-1139/)

dahcmed 10-31-2006 12:09 AM

Green Algae
 
I'm seeing some green algae, in the gravel in the front part of the aquarium and a few on the glass. I'm still trying to get hold of Nitrate and Phosphate testers.

I have a 15g, heavily planted, 40W 12hrs a day. Doing a weekly 25% water change. Ammonia-0, Ph - 7.5, KH - 14. 8 mollies, and a few shrimps.

Questions:
- I'm planning on gravel vacuum and more frequent wc, would this be enough?
- Am I overlighting my aquarium?
- If I find the phosphate level too high, what's the safest way to remove them?

bettababy 10-31-2006 12:39 AM

Re: Green Algae
 
I have a 15g, heavily planted, 40W 12hrs a day. Doing a weekly 25% water change. Ammonia-0, Ph - 7.5, KH - 14. 8 mollies, and a few shrimps.

Questions:
- I'm planning on gravel vacuum and more frequent wc, would this be enough?
- Am I overlighting my aquarium?
- If I find the phosphate level too high, what's the safest way to remove them?[/quote]
One queston at a time:
1. It's hard to determine what is "enough" until we know the cause. I would suggest asking again once we know your nitrate and phosphate levels.
2. I would say you're borderline with light... it partially depends on the plants you're keeping. I never suggest more than 8 - 10 hrs, and I've never had any complaints... my customers follow my directions and all bring me lots of plants because they don't want to throw away the excess, their plants thrive.
3. The safest way to remove phosphate, and quickest way I know of is to use a phosphate remover called PhosLock. I've found this to be the most effective product on the market to date, at least available around here. Others may have ideas of products not available in this area. The last time I checked, Dr's Foster & Smith still sold it, and it was cheaper that way than off the LFS shelf. Again, this will depend on where you're located, and what stores you have available to you.
How often and how much do you feed the fish? Many people aren't aware, but there is a heavy phosphate content in most flake foods, and if overfed, it can create a problem with algae. You'll want to be sure you don't feed more than once/day, and not more than your fish can FINISH within 1 - 2 minutes.
I would also test tap water for phosphate if it shows up in your tank. It isn't uncommon to find this, and the best way to deal with that is to buy bottled water for your aquarium. Because you are keeping live plants, I would suggest spring water, it seems to be the best. DO NOT use distilled water. Most bottled drinking waters are known to be safe from phosphates and other nutritent levels that can cause problems. If using R/O water, keep track of your mineral content, be sure to use fertilizer, and mineral supplements to keep the fish healthy. Mollys can usually handle softer water if acclimated down slowly, but they need enough mineral content for their organs to function properly.
Hope this helps!

dahcmed 10-31-2006 02:30 AM

Wow! Thanks for a detailed answer.


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