Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   pop's possible procedure (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/pops-possible-procedure-113447/)

pop 09-06-2012 09:15 AM

pop's possible procedure
 
hello:
Everybody here in the forum have provided so much knowledgeable information sound judgments and advice that 'I have done been beaten down' by the sound arguments made about the nitrogen cycle and cycling aquariums. I guess I will try testing aquarium water. though I donít like runnen with my tail between my legs to a new and different view.

Possible considerations:
Always start with clean hands equipment and test area.
Oneís finger tip should never be used to seal the opening of test vial and will contaminate the sample.
Test vials should never be rinsed in the aquarium and test samples must not be returned to aquarium but be discarded.
Rinse testing vial several times in tap water to insure there is no contamination from previous test.
Discard rinse water do not return rinse water to aquarium
Use Water from the aquarium as final rinse so residual wonít affect the results.

COLLECTION
Possible procedure
Submerge the rinsed test vial that is capped to midwater
Open test vial and allow to fill
Cap test vial while submerged
Discard excess water do not return excess water to aquarium.
The time between collecting a sample and testing the sample may effect results
Validate sample by collecting two samples.

TESTING
Possible procedure
Use reagents before expiration date
Store reagents in a cool dark place
Liquid reagents will concentrate due to evaporation and adsorption of air into the solution altering test results.
The angle the reagent bottle is held in relation to test vial will effect the volume of each drop of reagent thus altering test results also too much reagent or too little will affect test results.
Roll capped test vial in hand do not shake up and down to mix. (Using a two magnets should work for mixing tool).

ANALYSIS
Possible procedure
Matching test solutions to color comparator use white paper background and read into normal daylight or incandescent light source. The type of light can cause major comparison problems and different results
Exposure to sunlight will cause nitrite color samples to change color.
The color of the water can alter the color comparison.

Kordon LLC - Kordon - Low Range Nitrate Test Kit
http://www.fishchannel.com/fish-health/healthy-aquariums/water-testing.aspx
http://aquabaz.tripod.com/aquatru.htm

1077 09-06-2012 10:13 AM

Would also add that not leaving sample to set long enough ,or leaving sample set for too long,,can affect reading's.:lol:
In all honesty,, if ammonia and nitrites read anything but zero with fishes/invert's present,,then immediate water change would be good course of action.
Are no safe level's of these two toxin's as far as fish are concerened ,(opinion's are another matter) so ball park reading's for ammonia,nitrites,are close enough to have positive or negative effect on livestock.
Sure some species are more tolerant of the discomfort from ammonia/nitrites than other's, but they cannot speak to what level's are tolerable.

AbbeysDad 09-06-2012 10:30 AM

A few suggestions...

> I scoop a (clean/dedicated) plastic cup of water from the aquarium.
> I use a (clean/dedicated) medicine dropper to measure water into the test tubes.
> Regents are well shaken to ensure complete mixing.
(Especially regent #2 in nitrate test.)
> Hold regents vertical when adding drops.
> Cap and invert or shake tube between and after last regent.
> Ensure proper time interval (5min) for color to properly set.
> Discard test tube contents in sink and rinse tubes well with tap water - leave uncapped to dry.
> Regents are kept sealed at room temperature.

1077 09-06-2012 10:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AbbeysDad (Post 1231411)
A few suggestions...

> I scoop a (clean/dedicated) plastic cup of water from the aquarium.
> I use a (clean/dedicated) medicine dropper to measure water into the test tubes.
> Regents are well shaken to ensure complete mixing.
(Especially regent #2 in nitrate test.)
> Hold regents vertical when adding drops.
> Cap and invert or shake tube between and after last regent.
> Ensure proper time interval (5min) for color to properly set.
> Discard test tube contents in sink and rinse tubes well with tap water - leave uncapped to dry.
> Regents are kept sealed at room temperature.


Yes,,the eye dropper or medicine dropper, makes it much easier to fill the vial's with proper amount of water.
Have not used my test kit's for a good while, but remember the scooping and dumping with just the vial's to try and hit the mark on test vial.:lol:

AbbeysDad 09-06-2012 02:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1077 (Post 1231422)
Yes,,the eye dropper or medicine dropper, makes it much easier to fill the vial's with proper amount of water.
Have not used my test kit's for a good while, but remember the scooping and dumping with just the vial's to try and hit the mark on test vial.:lol:

Yea, I picked up an inexpensive plastic 5ml one at wallymart, used for kiddie medcines. Works great.

keeperofthezoo 09-07-2012 10:19 AM

I picked up 2 20cc plastic syringe, one for each of my aquariums. I never thought of a dropper. Nice idea.

Freshcatch 09-07-2012 10:42 AM

Love my syringes. I can take water samples from under the water in the middle of the aquarium, plus it acts like a dropper putting the water in the vials for testing.


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