Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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Created5thday 08-29-2012 05:26 PM

unsalted
 
Hi all, I believe this is my first post here. I seriously thinking of going back to fresh water aquarium from running a 210 saltwater tank for two years now. I will be selling corals and fish, but am unsure of what not to sell. I know i will have to sell that skimmer, but i believe i an keep the sump? also need lots of thoughts on keeping a freshwater tank. I know i want live plants and lots of fish. So what kind of filter system do i need?

i will be asking more question as they come up
thanks much
gary

madyotto 08-29-2012 06:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Created5thday (Post 1219479)
Hi all, I believe this is my first post here. I seriously thinking of going back to fresh water aquarium from running a 210 saltwater tank for two years now. I will be selling corals and fish, but am unsure of what not to sell. I know i will have to sell that skimmer, but i believe i an keep the sump? also need lots of thoughts on keeping a freshwater tank. I know i want live plants and lots of fish. So what kind of filter system do i need?

i will be asking more question as they come up
thanks much
gary

personally i would keep the sump and remove all marine type things out of it add lots of new filter foam and bio balls maybe think about a UV sterilization kit to boot

a good sized air curtain or a few air stones.
also before you do start think what fish you do want in-case you can save yourself alot of time and expense

for example if you would want fish like neons or any other acidic type fish then you COULD try and find some aquatic peat only use aquatic peat not so easy to find these days but placing about a quarter inch of it under the gravel at the back half of your tank means
A. your plants will stay very healthy
and
B. your ph level will remain low meaning no chemicals are needed to maintain this

i cant really help with what to sell or what not to
hope this helps and if you can be more persific as to what advice you may requier i may be able to help further

Created5thday 08-29-2012 07:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by madyotto (Post 1219559)
personally i would keep the sump and remove all marine type things out of it add lots of new filter foam and bio balls maybe think about a UV sterilization kit to boot

a good sized air curtain or a few air stones.
also before you do start think what fish you do want in-case you can save yourself alot of time and expense

for example if you would want fish like neons or any other acidic type fish then you COULD try and find some aquatic peat only use aquatic peat not so easy to find these days but placing about a quarter inch of it under the gravel at the back half of your tank means
A. your plants will stay very healthy
and
B. your ph level will remain low meaning no chemicals are needed to maintain this

i cant really help with what to sell or what not to
hope this helps and if you can be more persific as to what advice you may requier i may be able to help further


Thanks Madyotto for your reply,
Yes i agree with you in keeping the sump, even though it's a monster...it was custom made, it's about 70gals. I know the skimmer will have to go, as it will not work in fresh water. I will be keeping the rodi water treatment system. As for the fish, My heart wants discus, but i know it takes good husbandry. I did read something about trying to find fish at about your water ph level, i guess the thinking is that you won't have to fight trying to maintain a ph level???
So i guess i need to find some fish and plants that would be neutral with each other. Do you think i need a canister filter also beside the sump? also i will be selling metal halide fixture, and looking into getting leds, as looking forward to a lower electrical bill.

thanks again.

still have much more to study on.

gary

thekoimaiden 08-29-2012 08:06 PM

Welcome to the forum and back to the freshwater side of things!

In a 210 gal you could certainly do discus, but for your first time back in freshwater, it might not be a good first choice. They are a little more sensitive than your average fish. There certainly are other larger fish that would work. But we need to know some info first. I'll get to that in a minute.

With freshwater tanks, we don't normally use RO/DI water. Normal freshwater tanks need water changes every week or so, and using RO and replacing the minerals in the water on a weekly basis would get very expensive and time consuming. We work with the water parameters (GH, KH, and pH) from our tap. It's simply easier that way. You might have the necessary test kits to determine this. If not, these values can often be found in a local water quality report.

You are certainly right to sell your high lighting. That would blind a lot of freshwater fish.

madyotto 08-30-2012 04:03 AM

i agree to selling the lighting but L.E.Ds with plants may not be your best choice
i do not know your location but as i say things like discus and neon's and any other acidic type
fish are\can be more hassle if you where to put natural aquatic peat under your gravel about a half inch for discus you should be ok as far as ph goes but only if you only do small water changes to allow the ph to readjust naturally

also contary to opinion hevey planted tanks like mine only need a water change of 25% every 9 months or so unless test results say other wise

i sussesfully ran a 8OO liter tank with no changes after its cycle for over 8 years

many disagree with this but it has had lots of studys done and some top reaserchers agree with 8 or 9 months

discus are a hard one and maybe try to find the aquatic peat but start with other larger fish

and see where your heart leaves you

AbbeysDad 08-30-2012 08:43 AM

Welcome to the forum!

You're correct that the protein skimmer doesn't work with fresh water so it has to go.
You could continue to use the sump for filtration as they are excellent even though fish keepers with most large fresh water tanks would opt for a good canister filter.
But since you already have the space and the sump, I'd sure use it and I'd set it up pretty much the way you had it for SW with filtration media.

(Especially) If you had corals, you might have been using RO, DI, or RO/DI water to mix with sea salt? You won't necessarily need this with FW, although you can use it if you treat for minerals, trace elements and pH. However, most use treated (to remove chlorine) tap water. I suggest you test your tap water using the API Freshwater Master kit. I have well water with high nitrates and although nitrate levels are perhaps less serious in FW than SW, they are still a concern.
On the subject of water, you'll want to do weekly water changes to keep the water fresh. This can be 20-50%.
I presume you know all about the N2 cycle since you had a SW tank, you probably had live rock and live sand? You might wish to use one of the bacteria starters in your new FW setup (Tetra SafeStart, Seachem Stability, API QuickStart to name a few).

For substrate, choose a fine gravel or better yet sand. Many report success with play sand. I am using pool filter sand as it is typically slightly larger grain that will not compact. I feel sand is better because fish/plant waste and uneaten food can't get down under quickly like it can with gravel. This means no uneaten food and mulm slowly decays on top (or it can easily be siphoned off) just as in nature.

Consider having lots of plants. Plants (both rooted and floating) are not only aesthetically natural and pleasing, but help filter the water. You may need to examine lighting and use some type of fertilizer (root tabs and or a liquid like Seachem Flourish).

Decide on the type of tank you want and choose the right fish. I like community fish, while many prefer semi-aggressive or aggressive. There is a lot of good information in the 'Tropical Fish Profile' section of the forum (top of page).
Only add a few fish at a time and even though you have a large tank, be careful not to over crowd. I know a few fish seem lost in a large tank, but growing stock slowly and ensuring they have ample space pays huge benefits. Bear in mind that many shoaling fish are most happy in larger groups. A dozen or more neon tetras or zebra danios are a sight to see in a large tank.
Another consideration is fish size. You have room in a 200g tank for fish that grow large, but remember that big fish see little fish as food!

Okay...best of luck and keep us posted.

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