Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/)
-   Cyprinids and Atherinids (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/cyprinids-atherinids/)
-   -   Orange Glo-Light (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/cyprinids-atherinids/orange-glo-light-11160/)

Jasey 01-23-2008 12:11 PM

Orange Glo-Light
 
At the LFS there was a bright orange fish labeled the Orange Glo-Light. I have read about fish being dyed and I wondered if this was the case with this tetra. It just seems so abnormally bright? At Petco I also saw orange fish like this, as well as cherry-red ones.

fish_4_all 01-23-2008 01:25 PM

Vibrant colors can simply be a sign of a really healthy, color food enhanced fed fish.

The only way I know to tell if it is dyed is that the color will appear opaque where glo lites are normally a translucent color. If you have ever seen a puffy paint that is what I have seen is the most common look from a dyed fish. It may be transluctent still but will look thick and unform instead of a natural coloration pattern.

This one wouldn't be dyed, it would most likely be injected so it will look like the coloraiton is under the skin and actually in the fish instead of on it.

Jasey 01-23-2008 08:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fish_4_all
Vibrant colors can simply be a sign of a really healthy, color food enhanced fed fish.

The only way I know to tell if it is dyed is that the color will appear opaque where glo lites are normally a translucent color. If you have ever seen a puffy paint that is what I have seen is the most common look from a dyed fish. It may be transluctent still but will look thick and unform instead of a natural coloration pattern.

This one wouldn't be dyed, it would most likely be injected so it will look like the coloraiton is under the skin and actually in the fish instead of on it.

Hmm, the fish that I saw looked like these: http://www.petfish.net/kb/entry/757/
That site says they are "genetically engineered" Zebra Danios. Any fish that has been "genetically engineered" to glow in the dark doesn't seem healthy or safe!

Lupin 01-23-2008 11:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jasey
Hmm, the fish that I saw looked like these: http://www.petfish.net/kb/entry/757/
That site says they are "genetically engineered" Zebra Danios. Any fish that has been "genetically engineered" to glow in the dark doesn't seem healthy or safe!

They're safe and healthy. The only thing I despised is it's not natural. It's ugly in my opinion, period.;)

The-Wolf 01-24-2008 12:27 PM

there are two fish that have glowlight as part of their common name
glowlight tetra Hemigrammus erythrozonus and glowlight danio Danio choprai, both of which are natural fish the have a bright orange sheen to them.

now there is glow-fish (tm) that are genetically modified zebra danios Danio rerio and, although not dyed in the typical sense of the word, are (IMHO) an abomination that should be avoided like the plague.

the word glow is often written as glo, so glo-light or even glolite is seen to describe all three fish.

HTH

fish_4_all 01-24-2008 01:04 PM

If my LFS store carried them I would buy them. The research has produced huge populations of these fish and the genetic manipulation is passed on through natural breeding so why not? Hairless dogs and cats are huge now, abominations that they are so why not fish that now have natural CAPTIVE bred populations that can take the stress off of wild populations?

So they did it with fish, at least they are a healthy one. I think that a cross bred, genetically manipulated cat or dog that has no hair and freezes to death if the temperature outside is below is 75F is a lot worse than a fish that is more colorful and has been bred in capitivity for many years and can still act like a fish.

Don't get me wrong, I do not think it should be done just to do it but a lot of it is from genetic labs looking for cures and treatments for many diseases that millions of humans suffer from. If a genetically engineered fish can bring some happiness to someone in turn for helping to find a cure for cancer, why destroy million, billions or trillions of them just because they are not "natural"? And if they labs are selling the fish to make more money to someday find a cure for cancer, more power to them.

Pleco_stomus 01-24-2008 02:25 PM

what scientists did was used zebra danios and injected the eggs with a fluorescent gene, these types of danios were used to detect environmental pollutants at first. there is red green and i think a blue. they are all very healthy, and life span is the same as any other zebra danio. i had 2 red ones when i started to cycle a tank. both died tho. iam hoping to get some more but with my new Jack Dempsey the might become food.

http://www.aquascapeonline.com/prodv...p?idproduct=37

here is a site that explains it all in detail.

Jasey 01-24-2008 05:38 PM

Well, that is interesting that they are healthy even though they glow in the dark. I just had never seen this fish before and didn't know whether or not it was dyed. It seems reasonable to assume that they were because I've never seen a fish that bright but I guess I was wrong.

fish_4_all 01-24-2008 05:59 PM

Well I don't know if the ones you saw were dyed or if they are genetically enhanced. You could be right and they might be dyed. I would ask your LFS if they are dyed or if they are genetic fish. I didn't realize that the fish were reactive to UV until I read the article. The only ones I had seen were the ones that were genetically engineered to have specific colors in order to help with skin disorder research and cancer. I had heard about true glow in the dark but not UV reactive ones.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:00 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2