Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/)
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-   -   Want to get back into keeping fish (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/want-get-back-into-keeping-fish-10957/)

Twitch 01-16-2008 11:25 PM

Want to get back into keeping fish
 
I used to have fish a few years ago. I kept a 10g freshwater tank and several betta fish. Life got busy and I ended up finding new homes for the fish. Now, my animal family is growing just about every month. I share my home with everything from snakes, lizards, ferret, cats, sugar gliders, mice, ect. But I want to have fish again. My ultimate goal is to have a reef tank but I'm afraid I'm quite the rookie when it comes to fish. So now I want to start from scratch and keep freshwater fish for now.

I'm not sure what I want to keep, but I do know that I want live plants only as I love putting effort into something and seeing it thrive. :) Fake plants just don't do it for me.

I could keep something larger than a 10g but no bigger than a 29g (I believe thats a 20long) as we have to make room for five new snakes this year. :)

What would be your advice to someone just starting back up in this hobby? What kinds of fish do well in a tank that size? What is the best way to go about cycling it. (I never learned to cycle a tank.)

willow 01-17-2008 02:21 AM

hi and welcome aboard :)
we always say to people to try and buy the largest tank
that they have room for and can afford,we say go larger because
1.people usually end up buying bigger anyway
2.more water is more forgiving with mistakes and problems.
there are a few fish that would be happy in there,and
you can have yourself a very nice little comunity. :)
if you have any friends with tropical fish it would help you,
because you can borrow seeded material from their filter
or you can cycle your tank with Amonia,
called fishless cycle,which in my honest opinion is kinder.
there is a "sticky" about this which will help you alot.
welcome back to the wonderful world of fish keeping.

Twitch 01-17-2008 10:05 AM

Well the largest I can go is a 20 Long, so I will probably end up going with that. Are there 20 gallons in a 20 Long or 29?

I'll check out the sticky about the cycling. We were originally planning on getting a new snake next month but decided against it since we won't be breeding for another 9 months to a year. So now that money can go towards a fish tank.

Now I really wish I hadn't given away all my fish stuff. Now I'll have to go out and buy everything all over again. Oh in a live plant tank, what would be the best kind of light? The petstore I'll be using is Petsmart because its the only fish store other than a salt water pet store around. They carry a few different types and I want the plants to grow and be healthy. I had some issues before with dying plants.

willow 01-17-2008 10:11 AM

well i'm no good at suggesting how much light you
will need,if you pop on into the plant section you can
either read other peoples posts,or start a new one.
to save yourself a little bit of money you could look at
craigs list,local papers,ebay.
sorry i could not have been more help to you.

MattD 01-17-2008 10:31 AM

I don't see why you can't start out with a reef tank. I know you don't feel ready, but it's much easier than some make it to be.

As long as you're familiar (which you claim to have experience in the hobby already. plus I'm sure prudence with your other animals will definitely assist you here) with the concept of water changes and monitoring tank parameters, it's the same thing as a freshwater setup. Only slower, and more costly (a 10g nano-reef will cost you what a 20g FW will). Although I think you will find it is superior to freshwater keeping when it's all setup, corals and SW life are truly fascinating compared to drab plants and average-looking fish. If you are concerned of the cost and want price quotes and equipment names for a totally capable setup, PM me for info I'll be happy to list the stuff for you.

Not knocking on FW setups btw, my 40 gallon fw is my pride and joy. :D

TrashmanNYC 01-17-2008 10:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MattD
Although I think you will find it is superior to freshwater keeping when it's all setup, corals and SW life are truly fascinating compared to drab plants and average-looking fish.

have you ever seen an African Cichlid setup? :D

GregV 01-17-2008 11:02 AM

africian cichlids - are old and drab :P (hehe well for me they are, except victorians they are sweet).

check out certain killifish, rainbowfish, shrimp, Galaxy rasbora, dwarf cichlids, rams, hatchets, polypterous palmas, polyupterous sennagallus, ropefish, flowerhorn, Electric blue jack dempseys. the list goes on and on. if you do a little reasearch beyond the average "neon tetra tank" you will find alot of fish that a great looking - with awsome personality.

tho reef tanks are amazing in themselves.

MattD 01-17-2008 11:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TrashmanNYC
Quote:

Originally Posted by MattD
Although I think you will find it is superior to freshwater keeping when it's all setup, corals and SW life are truly fascinating compared to drab plants and average-looking fish.

have you ever seen an African Cichlid setup? :D

Yes. My friend has one. They are very pretty fish and come in many colors, but after the initial few observations, become rather dull. They don't stay in one place long enough for you to admire them imo - far too hyper.

Reef tanks are hypnotic. Between the corals swaying in the current and the odd behavior, the colors of the life, and the downright odd looks of the crabs/shrimp, they truly are difficult to break away from.

Twitch 01-17-2008 11:30 AM

Well what I need is something I can look at and escape from reality for a bit. I've heard that fish tanks are great stress relievers because they are so calming to watch. Life is pretty busy here with 3 cats, 3 sugar gliders, 7 snakes, 1 gecko, 1 ferret, mice, and a dog we are trying to find a home for (she is not ours). So I kind of want something that takes some work to upkeep but is relaxing to watch for a bit when I come home from work. :) Both FW and SW tanks will do that so its just a matter of what I want to go with.

MattD 01-17-2008 11:33 AM

In the end, I think you will be satisfied with any choice you make. Freshwater and Saltwater are rewarding. This is what I tell to people who ridicule me for my fish interests rather than having a dog/cat/bird/generic pet/etc..

Why manage one animal when you can manage several in an entire miniature contained ecosystem? You have control over everything from the atmospheric conditions to the color of the substrate and decor used.

You will feel great seeing your box thrive under your care. Good luck. :lol: :lol:


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