Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Starting out with Anubias (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-planted-aquarium/starting-out-anubias-108859/)

itsonlybarney 07-28-2012 08:38 AM

Starting out with Anubias
 
I bought my first piece of Anubias today. I spoke to my LFS where I bought the Anubias from regarding whether I need to attach the rhizome of the Anubias to driftwood or can be placed in the substrate.

He advised that it could be placed in the substrate (which is 3-5mm river gravel). However I have read here, and on other sites that Anubias is better when grown on driftwood. What is everyone's thoughts?

Also, is Seachem Flourish enough? Or do you recommend alternative fertiliser?

NB: I have a 10g cycled tank, with Eheim canister filter

BradSD 07-28-2012 08:49 AM

Everyone here will say to put it on a driftwood or rock. You can place it on the substrate with the rhizone not buried. I personally like mine attached to something.

Byron 07-28-2012 09:38 AM

Agree. The main thing is not to bury the rhizome or it may well rot. But if the rhizome is above the substrate, and attached to something is usually best to "root" the plants, it will be OK. And Flourish Comprehensive Supplement is fine for nutrients.

itsonlybarney 07-28-2012 05:32 PM

At the moment only the roots are in the substrate, the rhizome is just on the surface. It might be time to look at finding some driftwood. The LFS should have some, correct?

Byron 07-28-2012 06:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by itsonlybarney (Post 1175341)
At the moment only the roots are in the substrate, the rhizome is just on the surface. It might be time to look at finding some driftwood. The LFS should have some, correct?

Wood from a fish store is safer than collecting. I use Malaysian Driftwood exclusively, it is dark brown to black, heavy so it sinks immediately, not bad for initial tannins, and comes in so many different shapes you can usually find exactly what you're looking for. And some pieces are full of tunnels which is ideal for loaches and catfish. Many fish stores carry this now, depending where you are. You can also buy it online, but then of course you don't know exactly what you are getting until it arrives--each piece is different.

Byron.

itsonlybarney 07-29-2012 05:21 AM

I'll visit my LFS this week to see what they have.

One question I do have, how long would you recommend that I leave the lights on daily given I have a single Anubias plant, no shade.

I have 2 x 15W tubes, AquaOne Sunlight tube and a AquaOne Marine Blue tube.

rjordan390 07-29-2012 06:20 AM

Anubias are slow growers. I found that if you secure the plant to small piece of driftwood, it does not do as well as one planted on a bigger piece. So consider using a minumun size of driftwood of at least 2 inches round and about 3 inches long minumum. This gives sufficient room for the roots to attach before they go into the gravel. You can use thread or rubber bands to secure the plants.

Byron 07-29-2012 10:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by itsonlybarney (Post 1175932)
I'll visit my LFS this week to see what they have.

One question I do have, how long would you recommend that I leave the lights on daily given I have a single Anubias plant, no shade.

I have 2 x 15W tubes, AquaOne Sunlight tube and a AquaOne Marine Blue tube.

I would get some floating plants. I have found that Anubias and Java Fern in direct overhead light are likely to develop brush algae. In indirect light this is far less likely.

itsonlybarney 08-03-2012 04:42 AM

Based on my tank layout, not really sure any floating plants could actually protect the Anubias from the light. I'll keep the light usage to a minimum for now.

One of the leaves has started forming a slight yellow tinge to it, is that a sign of a lack of nutrients?

Byron 08-03-2012 01:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by itsonlybarney (Post 1182782)
Based on my tank layout, not really sure any floating plants could actually protect the Anubias from the light. I'll keep the light usage to a minimum for now.

One of the leaves has started forming a slight yellow tinge to it, is that a sign of a lack of nutrients?

Yes. But if this is one of the older leaves, this can also occur when the plant is shifted to a new environment.


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