Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Bad or Healthy for young kribs? (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/cichlids/bad-healthy-young-kribs-106646/)

Captain Jim Dandy 07-09-2012 01:50 AM

Bad or Healthy for young kribs?
 
I have seven young kribs living together in a ten gallon tank that are growing at a fair rate..some better than others. Probably two and a half months old. (Bought as juvys) Feeding mostly flake and omega betta pellets. I need to increase giving them frozen bloodworms I think. Anyway... I'm wondering if I keep some algea wafer in with them most of the time the smaller ones might catch up or do better?

Chesh 07-09-2012 09:03 AM

I don't have experience with Kribs, specifically, but I've reared several broods of other types of fry, and have found that, as a general rule, the smaller (and more crowded) their tank is, the more slowly they will grow on the whole.

Natural differences will be found in any brood, as with people, no two fish are identical. Some will naturally be larger, and some smaller. In some cases, it seems that the larger ones also tend to be on the more aggressive side, and so continue to get the best and first choice of foods and such, thus keeping the smaller ones from growing as quickly. This isn't a RULE, per say, just something I've noticed in my own tanks. In cases where I've separated the 'runts' and fed high protien foods in the hopes that they'll 'catch up,' to their larger brood-mates, I've found that some do, and some are just naturally smaller!

As far as leaving food in the tank, I would not recommend it. Aside from the fact that it will foul up the water, it will not change the fact that the larger fish will get the first picks at the food. Essentially, you will only be over-feeding the larger fish, and not helping the smaller ones in the least.

If you really want to try to help the littler ones along, get a bigger tank for all of them, or separate the smaller ones into their own tank. But as I said - even if you do, you may find that some of them are just smaller by nature.

Hope this helps - and maybe a Krib expert will have more advice for you. :)

Chesh 07-09-2012 09:18 AM

I wanted to add that I've read a theory (and I'm not 100% sure if this is true, perhaps someone can clarify), that fish release a hormone into the water that moderates growth. This is why fish 'grow to the size of the tank,' as it were. True or not, and whatever the reason behind it, it is true that if there are too many fish in the tank, their growth will be slowed, and perhaps permanently stunted, so you might want to think about moving these guys into larger quarters that better reflect their needs at full growth - regardless of their current size/age, if you want to see the best from all of them!

Captain Jim Dandy 07-09-2012 09:26 AM

New house
 
[quote=Chesherca;1146851]I don't have experience with Kribs, specifically, but I've reared several broods of other types of fry, and have found that, as a general rule, the smaller (and more crowded) their tank is, the more slowly they will grow on the whole.

Natural differences will be found in any brood, as with people, no two fish are identical. Some will naturally be larger, and some smaller. In some cases, it seems that the larger ones also tend to be on the more aggressive side, and so continue to get the best and first choice of foods and such, thus keeping the smaller ones from growing as quickly. This isn't a RULE, per say, just something I've noticed in my own tanks. In cases where I've separated the 'runts' and fed high protien foods in the hopes that they'll 'catch up,' to their larger brood-mates, I've found that some do, and some are just naturally smaller!

As far as leaving food in the tank, I would not recommend it. Aside from the fact that it will foul up the water, it will not change the fact that the larger fish will get the first picks at the food. Essentially, you will only be over-feeding the larger fish, and not helping the smaller ones in the least.

Yep.. you are absolutly right. I didn't want to separate because they should be "pairing up" soon. I believe I will move them into a 55 gallon I had ready. That will give me a better chance at sizing up the situation. You are pretty smart!

Chesh 07-09-2012 09:29 AM

Good call! They'll LOVE all that extra space! You'll have to let me know how everything goes - and if you get NEW babies eventually!!! http://i677.photobucket.com/albums/v...-thumbs-up.gif

Good luck!

Captain Jim Dandy 07-09-2012 09:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chesherca (Post 1146865)
Good call! They'll LOVE all that extra space! You'll have to let me know how everything goes - and if you get NEW babies eventually!!! http://i677.photobucket.com/albums/v...-thumbs-up.gif

Good luck!

I'll tell you how it goes... and ship you a few if you like. I like these guys.

Chesh 07-09-2012 09:56 AM

Please do! And thanks, but I'll pass on that second offer! Kribs are beautiful creatures, but I don't think they'd be very sweet to my darling Bolivian Rams ;)

Captain Jim Dandy 07-09-2012 10:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chesherca (Post 1146887)
Please do! And thanks, but I'll pass on that second offer! Kribs are beautiful creatures, but I don't think they'd be very sweet to my darling Bolivian Rams ;)

I love gold rams..not too familiar with Bolivians. Thanks,though..and yes,kribs are pretty brutal sometimes.

Captain Jim Dandy 07-24-2012 04:50 AM

Hormones or not
 
Well, the kribs were moved although I liked having them close in my room..they live in a 55 gallon by themselves at the other end of the house. I swear the 5 smaller ones have grown 15% in what..10 days? The two larger ones- I'm pretty sure they have paired already... stay in full color while smaller(half to a third the size of major pair) colored sometimes and sometimes not. Not really an onslaught yet but I can easily picture having to pull little ones if pair goes territory crazy. They are eating almost entirely bloodworms as of late. They were used to sunken flake gob, but the water depth makes that hard to do now and they don't take to pellets much.:-D

1077 07-24-2012 06:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Captain Jim Dandy (Post 1169094)
Well, the kribs were moved although I liked having them close in my room..they live in a 55 gallon by themselves at the other end of the house. I swear the 5 smaller ones have grown 15% in what..10 days? The two larger ones- I'm pretty sure they have paired already... stay in full color while smaller(half to a third the size of major pair) colored sometimes and sometimes not. Not really an onslaught yet but I can easily picture having to pull little ones if pair goes territory crazy. They are eating almost entirely bloodworms as of late. They were used to sunken flake gob, but the water depth makes that hard to do now and they don't take to pellets much.:-D


You say fish are eating almost entirely blood worm's.
This is not good for the fish who need a variety of food's.
I would recommend feeding a good quality pellet food made for cichlids, and maybe offer the blood worm's once a week as a treat.
Other choices would be chopped up krill freeze dried or frozen,chopped earthworm's,shrimp, but the majority of their diet would be a good pellet food such as New Life spectrum which also contains fruit's/vegetable matter that these fish need as well.
Are an increasing number of folk's weaning their fish off blood worm's all together.(little nutritional value)
These worm's are collected from water's that are largely contaminated with all mannner of sewage,bacteria,and the process of making them ready to feed fishes may or may not kill all form's of contamination/bacteria.
Starting a white worm culture may be a better option,and plenty of info on doing this is available on the internet.


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