Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Hexagonal 27 gal set up (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/hexagonal-27-gal-set-up-106072/)

CallieDee 07-03-2012 10:40 AM

Hexagonal 27 gal set up
 
I have a 27 gallon hexagonal aquarium...it is 24" tall and 21" across from point to point, 18" from flat side to flat side. I want to set it up soon and just wanted some advice on what types of fish to get for it.

We have hard water and it's pH is around 8. I would like to keep those parameters and don't want to mess with pH and water hardness and all that jazz.

I've never had a betta, not really sure if I would want one...but I'm really open to anything.

Byron 07-03-2012 12:40 PM

It would help to know the number for the hardness (GH), also the KH (carbonate hardness or Alkalinity). The latter buffers the pH to keep it stable, depending upon the extent of the KH. The GH is the mineral content that does affect fish.

The reason to know these numbers is that there are some very nice fish that do very well in taller hexagonal tanks, namely those that do not swim actively, but rather cruise around and browse plant leaves and branches for food. What i term sedate fish. A a number of these in a planted tank like you have would be a stunning display. But many of these are more specialized with respect to their water parameters, and most are very soft water fish. But knowing the specific GH and KH will tell us how much the tank might adjust on its own, and then we could consider some of the more adaptable species.

You can ascertain the GH and KH from the water supply folks, they may have a website. Also, have a browse through our profiles, second tab from the left in the blue bar across the top of the page. You will find some suitable fish (depending upon water params) in the characins, Cyprinids, badids, atherinids, anabantids and catfish sections.

Byron.

CallieDee 07-06-2012 07:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 1139651)
It would help to know the number for the hardness (GH), also the KH (carbonate hardness or Alkalinity). The latter buffers the pH to keep it stable, depending upon the extent of the KH. The GH is the mineral content that does affect fish.

The reason to know these numbers is that there are some very nice fish that do very well in taller hexagonal tanks, namely those that do not swim actively, but rather cruise around and browse plant leaves and branches for food. What i term sedate fish. A a number of these in a planted tank like you have would be a stunning display. But many of these are more specialized with respect to their water parameters, and most are very soft water fish. But knowing the specific GH and KH will tell us how much the tank might adjust on its own, and then we could consider some of the more adaptable species.

You can ascertain the GH and KH from the water supply folks, they may have a website. Also, have a browse through our profiles, second tab from the left in the blue bar across the top of the page. You will find some suitable fish (depending upon water params) in the characins, Cyprinids, badids, atherinids, anabantids and catfish sections.

Byron.

Byron,

We have well water where I live...the tap water that comes out of the faucet (which is what we use to re-fill the tank during water changes) is very soft, between 0 & 25 GH. However, when in the tank the water is hard, around 150 GH. pH is very high in the tap, around 8.4 and the KH is 300 ppm, also in the tap. I am not sure why the water changes from very soft in the tap to hard in the tank, we use a bit of API Stress Coat when we do water changes (25-30% every week) on the 55g tank.

So given that information, what I would like to do is eventually take the gravel out of the 55G and replace it with sand, and then use that gravel in the 30G hexagonal tank. I also have read that using part of the water from the already established tank will help with getting the new tank closer to fully cycled. I do not want live plants in the tank, I have no live plants in my 55G and am not really interested in putting them into the new 30G...just a preference I guess.

I do know about the fish profiles, and I have looked but there are A LOT out there so I was hoping on first hand advice. When this tank was set up when I was little I had an angel in it and would love to have one again, just not sure if the space is too limited.

Byron 07-06-2012 08:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CallieDee (Post 1144182)
Byron,

We have well water where I live...the tap water that comes out of the faucet (which is what we use to re-fill the tank during water changes) is very soft, between 0 & 25 GH. However, when in the tank the water is hard, around 150 GH. pH is very high in the tap, around 8.4 and the KH is 300 ppm, also in the tap. I am not sure why the water changes from very soft in the tap to hard in the tank, we use a bit of API Stress Coat when we do water changes (25-30% every week) on the 55g tank.

So given that information, what I would like to do is eventually take the gravel out of the 55G and replace it with sand, and then use that gravel in the 30G hexagonal tank. I also have read that using part of the water from the already established tank will help with getting the new tank closer to fully cycled. I do not want live plants in the tank, I have no live plants in my 55G and am not really interested in putting them into the new 30G...just a preference I guess.

I do know about the fish profiles, and I have looked but there are A LOT out there so I was hoping on first hand advice. When this tank was set up when I was little I had an angel in it and would love to have one again, just not sure if the space is too limited.

The GH of the source water (tap water here) will not change, or change very little, in the tank unless something is targeting it. In this case, a calcareous substrate or rock would increase the GH. Do you know what gravel you have?

Angelfish should be in small groups, they are a shoaling fish, so a group of 5 in the 55g would be OK.

CallieDee 07-06-2012 08:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 1144217)
The GH of the source water (tap water here) will not change, or change very little, in the tank unless something is targeting it. In this case, a calcareous substrate or rock would increase the GH. Do you know what gravel you have?

Angelfish should be in small groups, they are a shoaling fish, so a group of 5 in the 55g would be OK.

I believe we got both bags of Top Fin, though one of the bags was a larger gravel, and the other was more pebbly (word?). Unfortunately I live in a very small town, and the closest stores are around 30 min away and are both PetSmarts....I have recently begun to purchase items online through Drs Fosters & Smith though.

I meant an angel for the 30g hexagon, but if a group won't do well in the 30g then I will definitely not get any.

Byron 07-07-2012 09:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CallieDee (Post 1144243)
I believe we got both bags of Top Fin, though one of the bags was a larger gravel, and the other was more pebbly (word?). Unfortunately I live in a very small town, and the closest stores are around 30 min away and are both PetSmarts....I have recently begun to purchase items online through Drs Fosters & Smith though.

I meant an angel for the 30g hexagon, but if a group won't do well in the 30g then I will definitely not get any.

There is no info online about this gravel; if you still have the bag(s) is there any mention of it raising pH or GH?

CallieDee 07-07-2012 10:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 1144845)
There is no info online about this gravel; if you still have the bag(s) is there any mention of it raising pH or GH?

No we don't have the bags anymore. All I know is they were TopFin, which I'm learning through these forums is like the bane of the fish hobbyists existence because it's considered a crappy PetSmart brand.

I did check the product description on PetSmart's website and it does say that is may affect the pH...this is news to me.

Right now what I have in the tank with that gravel is 1 blood parrot, 2 jack dempseys, 1 pleco, 5 rosy barbs. And we vacuum the gravel weekly. Is this negatively affecting them?

Byron 07-07-2012 10:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CallieDee (Post 1144873)
No we don't have the bags anymore. All I know is they were TopFin, which I'm learning through these forums is like the bane of the fish hobbyists existence because it's considered a crappy PetSmart brand.

I did check the product description on PetSmart's website and it does say that is may affect the pH...this is news to me.

Right now what I have in the tank with that gravel is 1 blood parrot, 2 jack dempseys, 1 pleco, 5 rosy barbs. And we vacuum the gravel weekly. Is this negatively affecting them?

No, this won't matter much to these fish, which presumably are in the 55g as these are big fish with personalities. For the 27g hex, i would select a different sand/fine gravel. Play Sand works well and is inert. I use Quikrete Play Sand from Home Depot or Lowe's, and a single 50-pound bag for a couple dollars will do your 27g tank with sand to spare.

CallieDee 07-07-2012 10:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 1144884)
No, this won't matter much to these fish, which presumably are in the 55g as these are big fish with personalities. For the 27g hex, i would select a different sand/fine gravel. Play Sand works well and is inert. I use Quikrete Play Sand from Home Depot or Lowe's, and a single 50-pound bag for a couple dollars will do your 27g tank with sand to spare.

Ok that's good to know...however, I do want to use the sand for the 55g and transfer the gravel that is in there to the new aquarium, the 30g hex (I miscalculated before, its actually 30 not 27)

If I get a piece of natural driftwood for the tall 30g hex, will that ultimately lower the pH of the new tank?

Byron 07-07-2012 11:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CallieDee (Post 1144914)
Ok that's good to know...however, I do want to use the sand for the 55g and transfer the gravel that is in there to the new aquarium, the 30g hex (I miscalculated before, its actually 30 not 27)

If I get a piece of natural driftwood for the tall 30g hex, will that ultimately lower the pH of the new tank?

No. Wood does release tannins, but slowly, and even in tanks with a lot of wood the change in pH is usually minimal, perhaps one or two decimal points. The initial GH and KH obviously impact this. And, having calcareous substrate (as this seems to be) will negate it and still raise the pH.

I really would not use that gravel in the hex, you will be limiting your fish options.


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