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-   -   Air Pumps for a 125gal (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/air-pumps-125gal-105346/)

CinBos 06-26-2012 10:15 AM

Air Pumps for a 125gal
 
I've never really had an air pump before with my aquariums. I figured its time to pull the plug on them, because they can be used for more usefull things rather than just aesthetics. I was curious though, do I need the highest rated air pump for my 125 gal or can I get away with an air pump that is sufficient enough for a 75gal aquarium? The tanks height is 21", and I plan on having 2 air stones in the aquarium.

Geomancer 06-26-2012 10:21 AM

Any reason for having them?

I beilive the height of the tank is all that really matters, not the volume of water. The depth determines the water pressure that the pump must overcome. I'm not sure how deep a 75 gallon is in relation to a 125.

jaysee 06-26-2012 10:29 AM

a 75 and 125 are similar in height.

I don't know what you are hoping to accomplish with the air pumps. If you want to move water, a powerhead is far more useful and effective.

CinBos 06-26-2012 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jaysee (Post 1130376)
a 75 and 125 are similar in height.

I don't know what you are hoping to accomplish with the air pumps. If you want to move water, a powerhead is far more useful and effective.


I have plenty of surface agitation from my 2 filters, I just think its pleasing to look at...that is all. And I also know if and when I move, I can place air stones in a bucket for my fish. Just something I figured I would need at some point.

If you dont mind me asking, what is the difference between a powerhead and an air pump?

jaysee 06-26-2012 11:48 AM

As long as you like'm - you're the one that has to look at the tank everyday :)

A powerhead (or also a circulation fan/pump) is used to create a current in the tank. They are fantastic for preventing dead spots (areas with not much water movement) in the tank, as well as keeping the aquarium clean. In a smaller tank, air pumps can accomplish this, better, because a powerhead will usually be too much for such a tank. Air pumps move water by creating a vacuum. As the bubbles rise, they essentially pull the water up with them. So a strategically placed air pump on the far side from the filter will help to make sure that the water is being circulated.

Powerheads are better suited to larger tanks and are great for directing the flow of water.

IME the best setup is a circular flow in the tank. With an HOB, the filter should be at one end of the tank. The powerhead is placed on the other side, pushing water along the back of the tank to the filter intake. HOBs do a terrible job at circulating the non filter side, so the powerhead fixes that. Also, the current it produces on the far side will help the filter to circulate the water better. Same goes for a canister. Most people mount the spraybar on the back glass, so that it goes straight into the front glass, but it's better to mount it to the side glass - however you can get the water moving across the length of the tank, rather than the width. The power head is then placed on the opposite side. So, one will be pushing the water along the back of the tank and the other along the front, creating a circular flow. Rather than use a powerhead, I run 2 canisters, so one filter is pushing water towards the opposing filters intake. This keeps the tank in immaculate condition.

CinBos 06-26-2012 12:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jaysee (Post 1130469)
As long as you like'm - you're the one that has to look at the tank everyday :)

A powerhead (or also a circulation fan/pump) is used to create a current in the tank. They are fantastic for preventing dead spots (areas with not much water movement) in the tank, as well as keeping the aquarium clean. In a smaller tank, air pumps can accomplish this, better, because a powerhead will usually be too much for such a tank. Air pumps move water by creating a vacuum. As the bubbles rise, they essentially pull the water up with them. So a strategically placed air pump on the far side from the filter will help to make sure that the water is being circulated.

Powerheads are better suited to larger tanks and are great for directing the flow of water.

IME the best setup is a circular flow in the tank. With an HOB, the filter should be at one end of the tank. The powerhead is placed on the other side, pushing water along the back of the tank to the filter intake. HOBs do a terrible job at circulating the non filter side, so the powerhead fixes that. Also, the current it produces on the far side will help the filter to circulate the water better. Same goes for a canister. Most people mount the spraybar on the back glass, so that it goes straight into the front glass, but it's better to mount it to the side glass - however you can get the water moving across the length of the tank, rather than the width. The power head is then placed on the opposite side. So, one will be pushing the water along the back of the tank and the other along the front, creating a circular flow. Rather than use a powerhead, I run 2 canisters, so one filter is pushing water towards the opposing filters intake. This keeps the tank in immaculate condition.

When I first set up the tank, I did have a Hydor circulation fan, but I found that it created too much current and flow for my tank inhabitant. I just never had the pump version, I guess you could say. I have the canister at one end, and the HOb at the other with the, the spray bar from the canister more inthe middle. I'm trying to mimic the circular flow you mentioned.

jaysee 06-26-2012 12:32 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Try mounting the spraybar vertically.

CinBos 06-26-2012 12:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jaysee (Post 1130536)
Try mounting the spraybar vertically.

Also is the a pump power head essentially the same thing as a air pump?

Or, is the only way I can achieve air stones, through an air pump?

fish monger 06-26-2012 12:44 PM

I see no reason not to have an air pump for some air stones in your tank. Also, if you're not doing anything other than making bubbles, I'd get something that would just handle that. I think the model you mentioned makes good sense.

CinBos 06-26-2012 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fish monger (Post 1130548)
I see no reason not to have an air pump for some air stones in your tank. Also, if you're not doing anything other than making bubbles, I'd get something that would just handle that. I think the model you mentioned makes good sense.

I figured so, Just didnt want to go off and by the most expensive one when I'm only do the whole bubble thing.


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