Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/)
-   Anabantids (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/anabantids/)
-   -   How many honey gourami? (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/anabantids/how-many-honey-gourami-104219/)

Varkolak 06-13-2012 10:40 PM

How many honey gourami?
 
I went to my local fish store and got 3 honey gouramis(1M 2F) for the tank I will be planting tomorrow, they seem to really love all the space in my 60gal but I would like to get a few more. Would another male and 2 females tolerate each other well or should I just go all females with the single male? They are very hyper for a gourami always darting around the tank and they seem to be plenty social. I've read because these are supposed to be the mildest temperament gourami that it would be fine to have multiple males in a single larger tank. Tank mates will incluse red cherry shrimp, kuhli loaches(when i can find some) and hopefully blue tetras- Green plants yellow, red, and blue would look very nice with the loaches at the bottom.

Another question I know for sure these are honey gourami because of the brown line on females so I was wondering about dwarf gourami iridovirus, my LFS housed these with dwarf gouramis for about a month, not sure how long it takes to show signs but should I be worried or are honey's less vulnerable to it or even not affected by it?

GwenInNM 06-15-2012 07:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Varkolak (Post 1115988)
I went to my local fish store and got 3 honey gouramis(1M 2F) for the tank I will be planting tomorrow, they seem to really love all the space in my 60gal but I would like to get a few more. Would another male and 2 females tolerate each other well or should I just go all females with the single male? They are very hyper for a gourami always darting around the tank and they seem to be plenty social. I've read because these are supposed to be the mildest temperament gourami that it would be fine to have multiple males in a single larger tank. Tank mates will incluse red cherry shrimp, kuhli loaches(when i can find some) and hopefully blue tetras- Green plants yellow, red, and blue would look very nice with the loaches at the bottom.

Another question I know for sure these are honey gourami because of the brown line on females so I was wondering about dwarf gourami iridovirus, my LFS housed these with dwarf gouramis for about a month, not sure how long it takes to show signs but should I be worried or are honey's less vulnerable to it or even not affected by it?


I don't know anything about the transmission of Iridovirus, but I think you are safe it you wanted to add another male and a few more females. If you have live plants that will create a break up of space and areas for them to establish territories, I'd bet you'll be fine in such a nice size tank for them. Lucky fish!

Gwen

Byron 06-16-2012 05:03 PM

Here is some info on this disease from Dr. Neale Monks:
The quality of the dwarf gouramis in the trade has steadily declined for years, with batches of fish showing significantly higher levels of mortality than 10 years ago. Historically, retailers and aquarists have blamed bacterial infections, such as fish tuberculosis (Mycobacterium marinum). In recent years, though, attention has focused on a virus known as dwarf gourami iridovirus or DGIV.
Dwarf gourami iridovirus is apparently specific to the dwarf gourami (Colisa lalia), including the various fancy varieties of the species, such as neon gouramis and sunset gouramis. Infected fish develop a variety of symptoms, including loss of color, decrease in activity and appetite, the appearance of sores and lesions on the body, abdominal swelling and finally death. This fish disease is highly contagious, completely untreatable and invariably fatal.
Dwarf gourami iridovirus is apparently very common. One recent study of fish exported from Singapore found that 22 percent of all dwarf gouramis carried the virus. Aquarists should never purchase dwarf gouramis from fish aquariums containing fish exhibiting symptoms consistent with the dwarf gourami iridovirus, and all new fish should be quarantined for at least six weeks prior to being placed in the main fish aquarium.
For most aquarists, my best advice is to keep the hardier alternatives to dwarf gouramis. The thick-lipped gourami (Colisa labiosa) and the banded gourami (Colisa fasciatus) are both similar in size, temperament and coloration and make excellent alternatives.
With no disrespect to Dr. Monks who is highly expert in his field, new research has confirmed that this disease can be spread via other species and to other species in the same aquarium water. Obviously, buy gourami from a reliable supplier, and look carefully at the fish in the tank (and other tanks if the store uses a water filtration/exchange system that connects several tanks).

And some general info on viral diseases like this one, also from Dr. Monks:
Although fish with viral diseases may display symptoms the aquarist can recognize, positive identification requires biomedical tests beyond the abilities of the average fish hobbyist.
Viruses can be transmitted between fish by direct contact, or by water or wet objects being moved from one fish aquarium to another. In situations where the virus is known to be extremely contagious, as with the koi herpes virus (KHV) and dwarf gourami iridovirus (DGIV), strict quarantining procedures are essential.
I usually suggest the Honey Gourami as a replacement for those wanting the Dwarf, as it is brightly coloured, less temperamental, needs less space, and is fairly peaceful except when spawning. All of which is noted in our profile. I agree you have space to increase the group.

Byron.

Varkolak 06-19-2012 10:58 PM

I've ended up with 3 females and 2 males and 4 of them are happy as can be but 1 of the females hides above the filter, if i don't spook her out then she would skip meals, the other 4 have gotten used to me breaking their pellets up with a tweezers and feeding them but shes still scared of me, should i just wait it out or get another female to keep her company?

BTW SO HAPPY my male is displaying to one of the females so maybe hes finished with his bubble nest

Byron 06-20-2012 01:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Varkolak (Post 1122729)
I've ended up with 3 females and 2 males and 4 of them are happy as can be but 1 of the females hides above the filter, if i don't spook her out then she would skip meals, the other 4 have gotten used to me breaking their pellets up with a tweezers and feeding them but shes still scared of me, should i just wait it out or get another female to keep her company?

BTW SO HAPPY my male is displaying to one of the females so maybe hes finished with his bubble nest

That behaviour could be initial stress, and left alone she will settle and be normal (we hope). It could also be something else, such as an internal injury from the netting, or disease. This one can't say without observation over a period of days to see what develops. I would not add more while she is like this.

Varkolak 06-22-2012 07:03 AM

She seems to have settled in now, all 5 are happily learning where I feed them and pick the gravel clean together when I stop, It may just me but honestly female golden honey gouramis look prettier then their male counterparts once the black breeding mask sets in. The brown black lateral line on females is much more attractive then the black speckled male face but maybe that will change on me too :-P

:shock: My male just wrapped around a female while I was writing this, I almost don't want to turn off the lights

Byron 06-22-2012 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Varkolak (Post 1125561)
She seems to have settled in now, all 5 are happily learning where I feed them and pick the gravel clean together when I stop, It may just me but honestly female golden honey gouramis look prettier then their male counterparts once the black breeding mask sets in. The brown black lateral line on females is much more attractive then the black speckled male face but maybe that will change on me too :-P

:shock: My male just wrapped around a female while I was writing this, I almost don't want to turn off the lights

If you have floating plants--essential for gourami--you will likely find a bubblenest with eggs being guarded by the male in the morining.:-)

Varkolak 06-22-2012 03:31 PM

I have dwarf water lettuce, riccia, and water sprite, I've had a bubble nest for almost a week now and the males always guarding it, I cant really tell if hes guarding eggs or not it just looks like a giant dense mat of bubbles but he might be guarding it more fiercely today its hard to tell

Hes nothing if not ambitious, and it appears the femalel is back to spawning with him today

http://img339.imageshack.us/img339/7096/0622121626a.jpg

Byron 06-22-2012 04:40 PM

Excellent. Some eggs will hatch, and fry will remain among floating plants, and some will likely survive. They will feed on microscopic live foods in the plants. I usually grind up some flake food when i feed the fish, so the fry can begin to eat that.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:25 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2