Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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mphfish934 06-13-2012 11:31 AM

New tank and three fish died this morning...
 
Either the water temp got to low lastnight after I turned the light off or the water is not right.. cold someone look at the pic and advise.. tks...http://i48.tinypic.com/2z3vt45.jpg

Geomancer 06-13-2012 12:41 PM

Did you cycle the tank before adding the fish? The test strip you have does not test for Ammonia, which is the first toxin that shows up in an un-cycled tank. Test strips are often not correct either, the liquid tests are more reliable if you can spring for them.

Few pet stores bring this up, or if they do they often give terrible advice because no one likes to hear the correct answer: That it takes 4-8 weeks without fish to get a tank ready unless you go fully planted (and very few fish to start).

Instead of typing it all out, here is a link that explains what the cycle is, and how you can do it without fish: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...m-cycle-38617/

92smokeaccord 06-14-2012 11:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Geomancer (Post 1115442)
Did you cycle the tank before adding the fish? The test strip you have does not test for Ammonia, which is the first toxin that shows up in an un-cycled tank. Test strips are often not correct either, the liquid tests are more reliable if you can spring for them.

Few pet stores bring this up, or if they do they often give terrible advice because no one likes to hear the correct answer: That it takes 4-8 weeks without fish to get a tank ready unless you go fully planted (and very few fish to start).

Instead of typing it all out, here is a link that explains what the cycle is, and how you can do it without fish: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...m-cycle-38617/

this is true but i also want to add that taking water,gravel and decor from a full established tank will allow to skip the cycle process as you are adding the bacteria already.as for your test ditch the strips and take a bottle of water to your local fish store.9/10 they test it for free with the liquid testers.you can also buy the test and save you time to go there....post your new found parameters up when you get them.

rhymon78 06-14-2012 12:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 92smokeaccord (Post 1116322)
this is true but i also want to add that taking water,gravel and decor from a full established tank will allow to skip the cycle process as you are adding the bacteria already.as for your test ditch the strips and take a bottle of water to your local fish store.9/10 they test it for free with the liquid testers.you can also buy the test and save you time to go there....post your new found parameters up when you get them.

I would just like to add, you don't skip the cycle process by adding bacteria in the form of gravel, or decor from another aquarium, this just introduces the the bacteria you need, the bacteria then needs to take hold and colonise in the tank, and the filter media. This will still take time, and fish should be added very slowly.

The quickest way to do it, in my experience (this is how i did it) I added bacteria in a bottle (API Quickstart) but bacteria from an established aquarium would be MUCH better. I then added lots of live quick growing plants, 10 in a 29g. I then started adding fish in week 2, only 7 to begin with, small tetra. then added fish every week or so, until fully stocked. By doing it that way, you need to be sure of what you want as the fish you use to cycle, you are stuck with after the cycle.

The addition of a healthy number of plants allows the cycle to happen in "the background" as the plants assimilate the ammonia, and eventually the other nitrogen by products. You don't skip the cycle, the bacteria still colonises in the tank, its just not so noticeable, as in spikes when testing the water.

Definitely get the API freshwater master test kit, this is what most of us use and seems to be the standard really.

Let us know how you get on.

RackinRocky 06-14-2012 10:34 PM

I did what Rhymon did, and it worked like a charm. My 55 gallon was cycled in a week because I used a small amount of dirty filter media from a cycled tank, some of the gravel, debris from the substrate and a couple gallons of water from the cycled tank. I added a few plants, and then just 3-4 fish. After a couple of weeks, I added a few more fish, and so on. I'm still not up to the number of fish I want, but am trying to be patient :) All along, I've used the API Master test kit, and I tested daily for Ammonia and nitrites for several days, then started testing for nitrates as well. As soon as I had 0 ammonia, 0 nitrites and 5-10ppm of nitrates I knew it was cycled. I was thrilled, because my 10 gallon took 5 weeks to cycle. I've also had no scary spikes in the process like I had with the 10 gallon.

RackinRocky 06-14-2012 10:37 PM

Oh, and I still test for nitrates every few days, and at least twice a month I check for Ammonia and Nitrites. I believe its best to catch a problem early, before you start noticing stress in the fish. I always want to be on the safe side. The API Master kit will last you a LONG time, even if used daily, and is well worth the money! I still have stuff left in my original kit, and I've cycled a 10, 20 and 55 gallon tank. I recently bought a second kit. They are my "peace of mind."


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