Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Farlowella Cat in planted tanks (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/farlowella-cat-planted-tanks-100985/)

Deadstroke174 05-09-2012 01:10 PM

Farlowella Cat in planted tanks
 
I was wondering if Farlowella Cat's will be okay in a planted tank. I wanted to to get some whiptail cats for my 150 gallon but can't find them anywhere in my town or online. These are little more expensive but was curious if they behave like the whiptails.

Thanks,

AD

Termato 05-09-2012 01:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Deadstroke174 (Post 1074887)
I was wondering if Farlowella Cat's will be okay in a planted tank. I wanted to to get some whiptail cats for my 150 gallon but can't find them anywhere in my town or online. These are little more expensive but was curious if they behave like the whiptails.

Thanks,

AD

You will be fine, the Farlowella should enjoy the plants. It's the natural habitat of the fish.

Quote:

Origin: Columbia and Venezuela. Occurs in areas of heavy vegetation and tangled roots along the banks of slow-flowing forest rivers and streams and in floodplains and bogs.

Vegetarian; algae (common green) and diatoms (brown algae) will readily be grazed from every plant leaf and object in the aquarium. Must be supplemented with vegetable-based tablet and pellet foods such as algae and spirulina wafers. Will eat most prepared tablet foods. As a treat, cucumber slices, kale and blanched spinach may be offered.
Read more: Twig Catfish (Farlowella vittata) Profile

Deadstroke174 05-09-2012 01:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Termato (Post 1074889)
You will be fine, the Farlowella should enjoy the plants. It's the natural habitat of the fish.



Read more: Twig Catfish (Farlowella vittata) Profile

Sweet, my only worry is they like a PH of 7.0 where my water is more around the 7.3.

Termato 05-09-2012 01:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Deadstroke174 (Post 1074897)
Sweet, my only worry is they like a PH of 7.0 where my water is more around the 7.3.

That wont be a problem. Especially if you drip acclimate. If you get it from a local store then it def should not be a problem.

Captive bred ones shouldn't be an issue.

Deadstroke174 05-09-2012 01:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Termato (Post 1074900)
That wont be a problem. Especially if you drip acclimate. If you get it from a local store then it def should not be a problem.

Captive bred ones shouldn't be an issue.

Thank you, with my first tank i made way to many mistakes and am more careful now as to have the right fish, water, temp ect... in order to ensure they are happy and healthy :)

Termato 05-09-2012 01:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Deadstroke174 (Post 1074901)
Thank you, with my first tank i made way to many mistakes and am more careful now as to have the right fish, water, temp ect... in order to ensure they are happy and healthy :)

More importantly than pH is the hardness below 10 dGH.

As long as you have soft water you should be fine.

Again, captive bred fish wont be as much of a problem, especially locally bred fish that are kept in the same type of water you are using.

I would talk to your local fish store and see how they keep their Twig Catfish and see if those parameters are close to how you keep your fish.

Byron 05-09-2012 01:57 PM

Farlowella vittata is unlikely to be tank raised unless the store has a breeder to supply them, like a hobbyist or something. This species is usually wild caught. And they are sensitive to GH and pH. This is all in the profile.

The Whiptail Catfish is much more adaptable.

You mentioned the pH is 7.3, what is the GH and KH?

Byron.

Termato 05-09-2012 01:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 1074919)
Farlowella vittata is unlikely to be tank raised unless the store has a breeder to supply them, like a hobbyist or something. This species is usually wild caught. And they are sensitive to GH and pH. This is all in the profile.

The Whiptail Catfish is much more adaptable.

You mentioned the pH is 7.3, what is the GH and KH?

Byron.

Even with a wild caught fish, would a difference of .3 pH really affect it if you drip acclimate it?

Byron 05-09-2012 02:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Termato (Post 1074921)
Even with a wild caught fish, would a difference of .3 pH really affect it if you drip acclimate it?

Depends upon species. I know one reads that fish are adaptable to differing water parameters and all you have to do is acclimate them, etc, etc. While I accept this may work for some species, it will not work for many others, and there is ample science to support this view.

Dr. Neale Monks, a trained biologist with considerable experience, wrote in response to a question from a reader in the Spring PFK that the real indicator of a fish being healthy and "OK" in any tank is the lifespan, and this cannot be normal for the species if the water parameters are too far removed from the preferred. Now obviously individual fish can develop physiological issues and die prematurely, so one has to understand that. But in general terms, a short lifespan, meaning shorter than the average expected, is due to stress. And maintaining a fish in water that is vastly different from what nature intended for it will cause stress. If you read my article on stress it mentions that the fish's physiological homeostasis only functions well in the preferred environment. This can be broad for some species, or narrow for others.

Fish obviously adapt over time, because they evolve over time to adjust to a changing environment. But this can take generations and thousands of years, not a couple hours of drip acclimation.:-)

Some species manage better than others. From all that I have read, and from maintaining and successfully spawning Farlowella vittata, I do not believe this fish will last in hard basic water. Which is why i asked the OP for the GH and KH; the former is critical, and the latter will tell us if the pH may lower naturally.

Byron.

Termato 05-09-2012 02:21 PM

Oddly enough in the small town I live in the LFS has Farlowella vittata for sale.

All the other pet stores around D.C. I went to don't even have them.


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