Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/)
-   Beginner Saltwater Aquariums (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-saltwater-aquariums/)
-   -   saltwater noob (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-saltwater-aquariums/saltwater-noob-100606/)

jbsisson 05-05-2012 04:59 PM

saltwater noob
 
ok so i just got a free 175 gallon tank with a stand from my brother... i thought snake but really wanted to know what it took to start a salt water tank ....i just need to know a few things... what type of filtration system i will need and how often do you clean the tanks? and the live rocks... how many will i need? also if there are any fish i cant put together? is there an algae eater like in freshwater or just the attack packs? any assistance would be greatly appreciated! thanks for reading!

MetalArm3 05-05-2012 05:09 PM

Saltwater is a fun and interesting hobby that is fairly easy to master with proper research.

Before we go any further, I must ask.....what's your expected budget?

MetalArm3

jbsisson 05-05-2012 05:19 PM

[quote=MetalArm3;1070305]Saltwater is a fun and interesting hobby that is fairly easy to master with proper research.

Before we go any further, I must ask.....what's your expected budget?

MetalArm3[/QUOTE


we are just getting our feet wet per se and my wife asked what should we plan to budget... we have only owned freshwater fish a while ago

MetalArm3 05-05-2012 05:39 PM

[quote=jbsisson;1070312]
Quote:

Originally Posted by MetalArm3 (Post 1070305)
Saltwater is a fun and interesting hobby that is fairly easy to master with proper research.

Before we go any further, I must ask.....what's your expected budget?

MetalArm3[/QUOTE


we are just getting our feet wet per se and my wife asked what should we plan to budget... we have only owned freshwater fish a while ago

Ok, well as you may know saltwater isn't the cheapest endeavor to go on, but is very rewarding.Ill list a couple of basic items and prices below.

Live Rock- Average around $5 a pound. The basic rule use a 1.25lbs per gallon of water.
Live Sand- depending on shallow or deep sand bed, but you can figure around 1lbs per gallon.
at about $1 per pound (but varies on type and place)
Lighting-does it come with lighting? If not I would go wih LEDs, around $600 for that size tank but
then you don't have to purchase an expensive chiller or replace bulbs.
Heater-???? I never purchased one for that size tank
Salt- $70 for a 50lbs bucket
AutoTopOff system- highly recommend- elos makes a good one around $200
Aquarium Controller- also highly recommended, digital aquatics make a number of them starting
out at $200
Refractometer-$50
Protein Skimmer- like the heater, you must reasearch
Powerhead- Cheapest would be maybe a $100 for two hydors

That's just a basic run down with chemicals or inhabitants

Hope this helps out a bit more
MetalArm3
Posted via Mobile Device

Reefing Madness 05-05-2012 06:50 PM

#1-Dry Rock, there are a few hitchhikers on Live Rock that people want to stay away from, so they opt for using Dry Rock, or Dead Rock. Macro Rock is a good place to start looking for that. Either way you go you will need a minimum of 1lb per gallon
#2-Replacement filter media like filter floss and activated carbon (if you get a filter) Which is really not necessary.
#3-Multiple Power heads (2 or 3) 10x your water volume for just a Fish Only With Live Rock, and at least 20x your water volume for a Reef Tank. So lets say your going reef, and you have a 100g tank, you would need flow in that tank at minimum of 2000gph, or 2 1000gph power heads.
#4-Protein Skimmer, rated at 2 times your water volume
#5-Saltwater Test Kits. Reef Test Kit. Test for Ammonia, Nitrites, Nitrates, PH, Phosphates, Calcium, ALK and Magnesium.
#6-Saltwater fish food. Mysis Shrimp, Squid, Cyclopease, Algae Sheets, Romaine . Flake food is not really a good food to feed your marine fish.
#7-Aquarium vacuum. This one is iffy. Most don't use one, if you have enough flow in the tank you won’t need one
#8-Rubber kitchen gloves
#9-Fish net
#10-Two, clean, never used before, 5-gallon buckets
#11-Aquarium thermometer, digital being the best.
#12-Brush with plastic bristles (old tooth brush) - needed for cleaning the live rock if you don't get Fully Cured Live Rock.
#13-Power Strip, possibly GFCI outlets by the tank.
#14-Optional but definitely recommend getting a Reverse Osmosis or RO/Deionization filter for the make-up water, and a barrel for storing the water.
#15-Possibly a Quarantine Tank for your new fish. They sit in here for a few weeks to kill off parasites and bacteria, to keep it from getting in your main tank
#16-Heater rated for your size tank.
#17-Saltwater Mix. Marine Salt. Instant Ocean is the cheap Salt that beginners and Advanced use alike.
#18-Saltwater Hydrometer or even better a Refractometer, which is more accurate. There is also a Digital Meter that is way advanced if you have the cash.
#19-Aquarium filter (not absolutely necessary if running with adequate amounts of live rock, but nice to have if you need to use a mechanical filter or activated carbon, or GFO and such)
#20-Aquarium substrate such as live sand or crushed coral. Some go bare Bottom, others choose the 2-3" bottom, others, more advanced will try the Deep Sand Bed, which is over 6" deep.

MetalArm3 05-06-2012 01:45 AM

Well that list blows mine out if the water :(

I would like to say however if you go with live sand and live rock your cycling time well be greatly reduced. I bought "real reef" LR from live aquaria and couldn't be happier. It is a man made rock (synthetic) that is guaranteed to no contain hitch hikers. And the added benefit is that it doesn't harm our natural oceans by creating demand.
Posted via Mobile Device


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:33 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2