Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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marshallsea 05-05-2012 12:08 PM

api quick start
 
has anyone tried the api quick start? i would like to try it but im concerned its a gimmick. any thoughts?

CinBos 05-05-2012 12:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by marshallsea (Post 1069989)
has anyone tried the api quick start? i would like to try it but im concerned its a gimmick. any thoughts?

Not sure how determined you are, but I used the stability from Seachem and it still took forever to cycle. Your best bet is to introduce some filter media from an established tank. I used the Stability as directed, and didnt see anything, as soon as I placed some filter media in my canister, the cycling process began, and moved fairly quickly.

marshallsea 05-05-2012 12:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CinBos (Post 1070019)
Not sure how determined you are, but I used the stability from Seachem and it still took forever to cycle. Your best bet is to introduce some filter media from an established tank. I used the Stability as directed, and didnt see anything, as soon as I placed some filter media in my canister, the cycling process began, and moved fairly quickly.

thats what i thought. thank you.

rhymon78 05-05-2012 12:45 PM

I used it when setting up my first tank, can't say wether it worked or not as from about day 3 I had 10 live plants in there, then 2nd week added a few hardy fish. I did have a nitrite spike at about half way through 2nd week which came down after a water change and from then on didn't notice any problems. If your tank has lots of live plants you can bypass the cycle process altogether, and can have some (few) fish earlier.

marshallsea 05-05-2012 12:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rhymon78 (Post 1070033)
I used it when setting up my first tank, can't say wether it worked or not as from about day 3 I had 10 live plants in there, then 2nd week added a few hardy fish. I did have a nitrite spike at about half way through 2nd week which came down after a water change and from then on didn't notice any problems. If your tank has lots of live plants you can bypass the cycle process altogether, and can have some (few) fish earlier.

my tanks been running for ten days and i really want to add 1 or 2 small (tie to rocks) plants. 20gal. any suggestions? im looking for eazy, simple, and cheap. flourescent lights.

Byron 05-05-2012 02:56 PM

If you have medium hard or harder water with pH above 7, Corkscrew Vallisneria is good. Pygmy chain sword is a good plant for smaller (like 20g) tanks, whateer the water (soft or hard). These do well with moderate light. Stem plants require more lighting generally, though Brazilian Pennywort is an exception. Anubias and Java Fern attach to wood or rock (not planted in the substrate) and manage fine in low and moderate light. Floating plants are always easy and good for the water and the fish. Water Sprite is perfect, the Pennywort can also be floated and is quite attractive.

You will note that the names shaded, so you can click on them to see our profile with photos and information. There are other plants for moderate or low light, but these are less fussy which was your criteria.

Byron.

Hanky 05-05-2012 03:43 PM

IMO most of the chemicals out there are gimmicks or quick fixes, nothing compares or is as cheap as old fashioned cycling and water changes to keep water chemistry just right. only thing I ever add is dechlorinator.
I agree with Byrons plant suggestions, I also like hormwort I have it floating in my tank

AbbeysDad 05-06-2012 03:13 PM

I'm going to have to go against the grain here to 'say' that for what it's worth, I think bio-seed bacteria in a bottle has come of age, especially with Tetra, Seachem and API in the market. 10 years ago these products were admittedly less effective. The bacteria in a bottle today are much better and although resilient, there are distribution and sometimes storage challenges due to temperature.

I would say that whenever possible, use a bio-seed from another healthy tank (be it filter or substrate media), but failing that, a few dollars spent on nitrifying bacteria in a bottle can make a big difference.


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