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New Family Member, Pics to Come Soon.....
Old 11-26-2007, 01:48 PM   #81
 
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What is the other dog's breed? I think Betty is getting more sociable after all that schooling! It also depends on the age of her new friend. She will probably accept a younger dog faster.

But we skipped the class yesterday because of the unfriendly weather. We do not have a garage large enough for the class. Last year we went to all the classes even in heavy snowfall. But my dog is very reluctant to lie down onto the cold ground so I think I shouldn't give her a chance to be disobedient.
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Old 11-26-2007, 02:18 PM   #82
 
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The other dog is a chiwawa mix. She's pretty obedient as well, considering he just got her.
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Old 11-26-2007, 06:17 PM   #83
 
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Well, todays class went very well. We went over the first 21 items of the 31 total items in Rally-O. She's still a little sloppy on her heel and sit, but getting better. Once we get the commands down, we will start fine-tuning. And as for her Wait and Stay commands, she does perfect. As well as Come. She also Sit's and Down's at a distance. But if there's any distractions, forget it, lol.

As for the walk today afterwards with my friends dog, ouch, lol. She was 10 times worse than she's been, and really wanted at his dog. I wish Cesar was here, lol, would put her dog in with all his pits, lol. I'm not sure a dog here and a dog there is going to help much, she needs real socialization with lots of dogs. Any input on this?

I used the Gentle Leader today, as the friend wanted something that would close her mouth if she lunged, as his dog is really small. Normally I use a prong collar when I have her in training.

Well, todays class went very well. We went over the first 21 items of the 31 total items in Rally-O. She's still a little sloppy on her heel and sit, but getting better. Once we get the commands down, we will start fine-tuning. And as for her Wait and Stay commands, she does perfect. As well as Come. She also Sit's and Down's at a distance. But if there's any distractions, forget it, lol.

As for the walk today afterwards with my friends dog, ouch, lol. She was 10 times worse than she's been, and really wanted at his dog. I wish Cesar was here, lol, would put her dog in with all his pits, lol. I'm not sure a dog here and a dog there is going to help much, she needs real socialization with lots of dogs. Any input on this?

I used the Gentle Leader today, as the friend wanted something that would close her mouth if she lunged, as his dog is really small. Normally I use a prong collar when I have her in training.

Here's what we get to work on now....

*May be used multiple times on a course.

1. START – Indicates the beginning of the course.
2.FINISH – Indicates the end of the course - timing stops.
3. HALT – Sit. While heeling, the handler halts and the dog comes to a sit in heel position. The team then moves forward toward the next exercise sign (station), with the dog in heel position. (Stationary exercise)
4. HALT – Sit – Down. While heeling, the handler halts and the dog comes to a sit. The handler then commands the dog to down, followed by the command to heel forward from the down position. (Stationary exercise)
5. * Right Turn. Performed as a 90º turn to the right, as in traditional obedience.
6. * Left Turn. Performed as a 90º turn to the left, as in traditional obedience.
7. *About Turn – Right. While heeling, the team makes a 180º about turn to the handler’s right.
8. * About “U” Turn. While heeling, the team makes a 180º about turn to the handler’s left.
9. * 270° Right Turn. While heeling, the team makes a 270º turn to the handler’s right. 270° turns are performed as a tight circle, but not around the exercise sign.
10. * 270° Left Turn. While heeling, the team makes a 270º turn to the handler’s left. 270º turns are performed as a tight circle, but not around the exercise sign.
11. 360° Right Turn. While heeling, the team makes a 360º turn to the handler’s right. 360º turns are performed as a tight circle, but not around the exercise sign.
12. 360° Left Turn. While heeling, the team makes a 360º turn to the handler’s left. 360º turns are performed as a tight circle, but not around the exercise sign.
13. Call Front – Finish Right - Forward. While heeling, the handler stops forward motion and calls the dog to the front position (dog sits in front and faces the handler). The handler may take several steps backward as the dog turns and moves to sit in the front position. The second part of the exercise directs the handler to move forward while commanding the dog to change from the front position to the handler’s right, around behind the handler and to heel position, as the handler continues forward. The dog does not sit before moving forward in heel position with the handler. (Stationary exercise)
14. Call Front – Finish Left - Forward. While heeling, the handler stops forward motion and calls the dog to the front position (dog sits in front and faces the handler). The handler may take several steps backward as the dog turns and moves to sit in the front position. The second part of the exercise directs the handler to move forward while commanding the dog to change from the front position to the handler’s left and moving to heel position, as the handler continues forward. The dog does not sit before moving forward in heel position with the handler. (Stationary exercise)
15. Call Front – Finish Right - HALT. While heeling, the handler stops forward motion and calls the dog to the front position (dog sits in front and faces the handler). The handler may take several steps backward as the dog turns and moves to sit in the front position. The second part is the finish to the right, where the dog must return to heel position by moving around the right side of the handler. Dog must sit in heel position before moving forward with the handler. (Stationary exercise)
16. Call Front – Finish Left - HALT. While heeling, the handler stops forward motion and calls the dog to the front position (dog sits in front and faces the handler). The handler may take several steps backward as the dog turns and moves to a sit in the front position. The second part is the finish to the left, where the dog must move to the handler’s left and sit in heel position. Dog must sit in heel position before moving forward in heel position with the handler. (Stationary exercise)
17. * Slow Pace. Dog and handler must slow down noticeably. This must be followed by a normal pace, unless it is the last station in the class.
18. * Fast Pace. Dog and handler must speed up noticeably. This must be followed by a normal pace, unless it is the last station in the class.
19. * Normal Pace. Dog and handler must move forward, walking briskly and naturally.
20. Moving Side Step Right. While heeling, the handler takes one step diagonally to the right and continues moving forward along the newly established line. The dog maintains heel position. The exercise may be performed just past the exercise sign.
21. Spiral Right – Dog Outside. This exercise requires three pylons or posts placed in a straight line with spaces between them of approximately 6 - 8 feet. Spiral Right indicates the handler must turn to the right when moving around each pylon or post. The first pass is going around all 3 pylons, then the 2nd pass you go around only 2 pylons, and the final pass you just go around 1 pylon.
22. Spiral Left – Dog Inside. This exercise requires three pylons or posts placed in a straight line with spaces between them of approximately 6 - 8 feet. Spiral Left indicates that the handler must turn to the left when moving around each pylon or post. This places the dog on the inside of the turns. The exercise sign is placed near or on the first pylon or post where the spiral is started. The first pass is going around all 3 pylons, then the 2nd pass you go around only 2 pylons, and the final pass you just go around 1 pylon.
23. Straight Figure 8 Weave Twice. This exercise requires four obstacles (pylons, posts or people) placed in a straight line with spaces between them of approximately 6 - 8 feet. The exercise sign is placed near or on the first obstacle where the exercise is started. Entry into the weaving pattern is with the first obstacle at the dog/handler’s left side.
24. Serpentine Weave Once. This exercise requires four obstacles (pylons, posts or people) placed in a straight line with spaces between them of approximately 6 - 8 feet. The exercise sign is placed near or on the first obstacle where the exercise is started. Entry into the weaving pattern is with the first obstacle at the dog/handler’s left side. It should be noted that in this exercise, the team does not weave back through the obstacles as they do in the Straight Figure 8.
25. HALT – 1, 2, 3 Steps Forward. The team halts with the dog sitting in heel position to begin the exercise. The handler takes one step forward, with the dog maintaining heel position, and halts. The dog sits when the handler halts. This is followed by two steps forward - halt, and three steps forward - halt, with the dog heeling each time the handler moves forward, and sitting each time the handler halts. (Stationary exercise)
26. Call Front – 1, 2, 3 Steps Backward. While heeling, the handler stops forward motion and calls the dog to the front position (dog sits in front and faces the handler). The handler may take several steps backward as the dog turns and moves to a sit in the front position. With the dog in the front position, the handler takes one step backward and halts. The dog moves with the handler and sits in the front position as the handler halts. This is followed by the handler taking two steps backward and a halt, and three steps backward and a halt. Each time, the dog moves with the handler to the front position and sits as the handler halts. The handler then commands the dog to resume heel position as the team moves forward toward the next station. (Stationary exercise)
27. Moving Down. While moving with the dog in heel position, the handler commands the dog to drop to a down position, as the handler pauses next to the dog. Once the dog is completely in the down position, the handler moves forward commanding the dog to heel from the down position. (Stationary exercise)
28. HALT – Fast Forward From Sit. With the dog sitting in heel position, the handler commands the dog to heel and immediately moves forward at a fast pace. This must be followed by a normal pace, unless it is the last station in the class. (Stationary exercise)
29. Left About Turn. While moving with the dog in heel position, the handler makes an about turn to the left, while at the same time, the dog must move around the handler to the right and to heel position. The dog does not sit before moving forward in heel position with the handler.
30. HALT – Walk Around Dog. With the dog sitting in heel position, the handler commands the dog to stay, then proceeds to walk around the dog to the left, returning to heel position. The handler must pause in heel position before moving forward to the next station. (Stationary exercise)
31. HALT – Down – Walk Around Dog. With dog sitting in heel position, the handler commands the dog to down and stay, then proceeds to walk around the dog to the left, returning to heel position. The handler must pause in heel position before moving forward to the next station.The dog heels forward from the down position. (Stationary exercise)
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Old 11-26-2007, 06:50 PM   #84
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonewolfblue

As for the walk today afterwards with my friends dog, ouch, lol. She was 10 times worse than she's been, and really wanted at his dog. I wish Cesar was here, lol, would put her dog in with all his pits, lol. I'm not sure a dog here and a dog there is going to help much, she needs real socialization with lots of dogs. Any input on this?
Do you maybe have a friend that lives closeby with a dog that you could arrange to regularly accompany, with Betty, on their walks?

I'm guessing if you did have, you'd have done this by now but I can't think of anything else I'm afraid. Unless you have a local boarding kennels and you would be willing to ask the owner/carer if they would mind you accompanying them while they walk the dogs. Bit of a long shot, but worth mentioning maybe.
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Old 11-27-2007, 10:26 AM   #85
 
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Well, not much around here, lol. A friend of mine is bringing his dog over a couple days a week, so hopefully we can get somewhere.
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Old 11-29-2007, 11:43 AM   #86
 
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Our 'Dog' School' is full of pooches - some of them are scared and can be self-protective and even aggressive. But with time they realise that it is much safer to be nice to everyone in the noble company. Last Sunday we all had to pet an 8-month old Dachshund who would show aggression to people, actually biting. He was much better when he was leaving the class and he didn't bite anyone that day. They are smart people, those Dachshunds. But once I had one who would attack Dobermans like a bullet and hang on their ears. Nobody could tear him away! Then people laughed at me when I used a muzzle strip on him . They understood everything when I took it off straight away ! Back then I had no info about dogs' schools and the rascal kept on biting cats on their stomachs so that the poor creatures couldn't even protect themselves, and devouring sparrows being led on a short leash! That was a creature from hell! He bit my husband in bed on the ear trying to keep me to himself! I think no school would improve his behaviour, really.

But I do not believe Betty is like that at all. After all, she is not a spoiled Dachshund, but a respectable Heeler! Besides, she is a girl, and everyone knows that girls do better at school She does need a bigger company of some pits, Rhottweilers and German Shepherds !
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Old 11-29-2007, 04:05 PM   #87
 
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Hah.... Girls better in school? lol. She's learning Rally faster than I am, lol. I also did some looking around, and sent her pics to an ACD Rescue, and they told me that she wasn't a Heeler/Aus. Sheph. mix but a purebreed ACD (Australian Cattle Dog). I also sent another email on her temperment, and see if they can steer me in the direction I need to go, as they deal with just ACD's and not multiple breeds. Would probably get better info from them. ;)
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Old 11-30-2007, 01:17 PM   #88
 
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I was just kidding about girls at school, of course. However, dogs-girls seem to be calmer and more obedient anyway around here. Their aggression mainly is directed on competing girls who are trying to dominate. For that they have a reputation being more fierce than male dogs in a fight.

Luckily, my own puppy shows only some uneasiness when being around someone scary, hairy or aggressive :) . She has a potential, though, this is what our instructor says.

Her own dog, however, is a real witch. She can't be stopped if she decides to charge. She is a Malinois, or whatever they spell it. It's a Belgian Shepherd. She's very protective. The instructor taught her to be decent with dogs, but as she went through a guard dog course, she may be nasty towards people.
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Old 12-02-2007, 08:23 AM   #89
 
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There is one more question I wanted to ask you about dog training.

Do you practice the kind of training when a dog attacks a person ('criminal') in America? I thought it might not be altogether legal. They do it here and the question of legality of this training is often raised.

Today we observed this training. The instructor was teasing the huge dogs to provoke their aggression. I thought it may affect a dog's psyche.

I think it is perfectly alright for police dogs, but an average one is a big question. What do you think? What about Europe, guys?
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Old 12-02-2007, 09:33 AM   #90
 
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I believe that training is only done by law enforcement and the military. There may also be private entities that do it for guard dogs, but for the average person, if your dog attacks another person, it's not a good thing, even a criminal.
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