Water Hardness and pH in the Freshwater Aquarium - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 18 Old 05-31-2012, 04:22 PM
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Byron, I've come across a confusing situation. Why would tap water with a pH of 7.4 rise to around 9 after aging in a bucket of water within 24 hours? Could a city add buffer that keeps it rising?
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post #12 of 18 Old 05-31-2012, 04:33 PM Thread Starter
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Byron, I've come across a confusing situation. Why would tap water with a pH of 7.4 rise to around 9 after aging in a bucket of water within 24 hours? Could a city add buffer that keeps it rising?
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In this situation, it is due to the out-gassing of CO2. Tap water has CO2 dissolved in it, in varying amounts depending where you are and how they treat the water and how far it travels. CO2 lowers pH by creating carbonic acid, just as happens if you diffuse CO2 into a planted tank. By letting the tap water stand 24 hours, the CO2 will dissipate out, and the pH will naturally rise accordingly, to its actual level. You can also shake it vbery briskly in a jar to out-gas the CO2. And you should always do either before testing pH, in order to get a more accurate reading--as you've seen, it changes.

A change from 7.4 to 9 is quite a bit, and I've no idea if this is solely due to the above of some other additive. Contacting your water folks on this may be advisable, it is good to know just what is in the water.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #13 of 18 Old 07-01-2012, 12:33 PM
Byron could you help me... I have some calcium build up on the back on my tank could you tell me how to get rid of it?
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post #14 of 18 Old 07-01-2012, 12:38 PM Thread Starter
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Byron could you help me... I have some calcium build up on the back on my tank could you tell me how to get rid of it?
Use vinegar (but not in the tank's water if this is inside) on a sponge or maybe paper towel; if it is really caked on, a scraper might be needed. A razor blade can work but it may scratch the glass. Rinse well with plan water afterwards.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #15 of 18 Old 08-28-2012, 04:22 AM
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The article is very helpful, thx!
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post #16 of 18 Old 11-01-2012, 12:55 PM
Just what i was looking for. Thanks so much Very enlightening. Will be referring back to this
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post #17 of 18 Old 01-10-2013, 02:59 PM
Your explanation is the first of these parameters that is lucid enough, without being condescending, for those of us (especially me) who are semi-literate in chemistry to understand. 1 year of college chemistry about 55 years ago.

Thank you many times over!!
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post #18 of 18 Old 10-01-2015, 03:45 PM
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Thanks Byron

I see that it has been a while since someone posted to it so I am pushing it up again, hoping to make it easier for others to find. .

I never had to worry about my GH before with my 55 gallon tank, never had hard water. Now since I moved to Florida an started a much larger tank, I found that my water hardness is 233ppm, and my KH is 161ppm. Been doing a lot of searching for the easiest and best way to lower my GH .

I found a place, Air Water and Ice, that sells a fairly inexpensive 50 gpd RO system with no extra bells or do-dads attached. I got a 55 gallon storage tank that I can batch my RO water and have ready to use when I need to do my water changes.

Again thank you for your post.

Jaybird1
The only stupid question is the one not asked.

Last edited by Jaybird1; 10-01-2015 at 03:50 PM.
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