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5.5 gal stocking question?

This is a discussion on 5.5 gal stocking question? within the Livebearers forums, part of the Freshwater and Tropical Fish category; --> Originally Posted by Tazman My conditions are perfect for my fish...they are african cichlids and the water parameters match the natural conditions of Lake ...

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5.5 gal stocking question?
Old 03-26-2012, 09:27 AM   #41
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tazman View Post
My conditions are perfect for my fish...they are african cichlids and the water parameters match the natural conditions of Lake Malawi in my tanks perfectly.

Not knowing my conditions in my tank, I find it rather disrespectful regarding your comment.
I have breed africian cichlids and continue to do so. I have a group of wild caught F0 Yellow labs imported directly from Lake Malawi which would not have breed at all, if they were not happy with my conditions. The fry from these fish command a higher price and I sell to my Local Fish Store.
compering your water conditions to lake is such a wrong move they are not in a lake and so there environment is wrong

as it is for any fish in aquatics

fresh water after a change helps to promote breeding so i would say that yours only doing so during the change is them insulting your condition's

/\ conditions do not mean water chemistry at all

and that once is nothing in comparison to the amount of times you have insulted me by actually calling me a lire
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Old 03-26-2012, 09:39 AM   #42
 
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I have not called you a lire at all. I merely stated points against what you have posted with you providing no evidence to back up what you are saying...other than it is FACT from your experience. Everyone's experience is different.

How can creating an environment like where my fish are naturally from be wrong for them...the whole point of keeping fish is creating an environment which mimics where the fish originate from.
The fish require certain conditions, I created those conditions. I have a sand substrate, plenty of rocks and few plants in my tank, this is what Lake Malawi is naturally, the pH is exactly the same as the Lake. The only thing different is the size of my tank compared to Lake Malawi.

We as fish keepers take on a responsibility to provide an environment suitable for the fish we purchase. In bringing them home to a small environment of a tank, we must purchase fish suitable to be kept in our tank size.
Some of the fish in my tank are from deeper water in Lake Malawi as such there is not much daylight in between their rocky environment, these are the fish that I have bred the most even with the lights I have in my tank.

The lights are more for viewing the intense coloration my fish show, there are 2 fish which I have, of show quality grade and would sell for a considerable high price for them. The person who has purchased the tank from me, offered a deal which was simply too good to turn down. I am still going to be responsible for their care and as the office they are going to is not too far away, can and will be checking on them several times a week. It took me 5 years of hard work to establish this tank and create a stunning tank which houses fish from Lake Malawi.

Am sure when you breed molly then this is what you would be doing, creating an environment which mimics the natural environment of the fish...having a bubble wand or air stone is not natural in my opinion and as such I do not use them. The filters create the water movement required for gas exchange.

Last edited by Tazman; 03-26-2012 at 09:43 AM..
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Old 03-26-2012, 09:53 AM   #43
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tazman View Post
I have not called you a lire at all. I merely stated points against what you have posted with you providing no evidence to back up what you are saying...other than it is FACT from your experience. Everyone's experience is different.

How can creating an environment like where my fish are naturally from be wrong for them...the whole point of keeping fish is creating an environment which mimics where the fish originate from.
The fish require certain conditions, I created those conditions. I have a sand substrate, plenty of rocks and few plants in my tank, this is what Lake Malawi is naturally, the pH is exactly the same as the Lake. The only thing different is the size of my tank compared to Lake Malawi.

We as fish keepers take on a responsibility to provide an environment suitable for the fish we purchase. In bringing them home to a small environment of a tank, we must purchase fish suitable to be kept in our tank size.
Some of the fish in my tank are from deeper water in Lake Malawi as such there is not much daylight in between their rocky environment, these are the fish that I have bred the most even with the lights I have in my tank.

The lights are more for viewing the intense coloration my fish show, there are 2 fish which I have, of show quality grade and would sell for a considerable high price for them. The person who has purchased the tank from me, offered a deal which was simply too good to turn down. I am still going to be responsible for their care and as the office they are going to is not too far away, can and will be checking on them several times a week. It took me 5 years of hard work to establish this tank and create a stunning tank which houses fish from Lake Malawi.

Am sure when you breed molly then this is what you would be doing, creating an environment which mimics the natural environment of the fish...having a bubble wand or air stone is not natural in my opinion and as such I do not use them. The filter creates the water movement required for gas exchange.
i agree we all take on a great responsibly to the fish we keep

and that your's are a tricky breed

however none of you seem to see the bigger picture that i was painting

i stated i only know from experience and yes
as a result some of what i posted is in-correct explained poorly ETC

you called me a lire by saying you have to do water changes to keep the chemistry right

evidently i don't and never have

if my chemistry was wrong i doubt that i would have apple snail eggs in my tank right now

the picture i was painting is VERY SIMPLE


THAT all but most keepers do changes as PART OF there routine

and not the routine OF THERE water chemistry

telling people to do weekly or monthly changes leave those with the right conditions and water chemistry causing un-needed stress

water change with no water chemistry improvement is un-needed stress

so much as putting your hand in the tank is stressful to them

and the main cause for many beginner's having a nitrate spike is as we all know over feeding

but by encouraging others (where possible) to create an environment that can handle nitrates quite well will only aid there downfalls
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Old 03-26-2012, 10:14 AM   #44
 
Hello?

Come on guys I've only asked a few simple questions about the maintaince of a 5.5 gal! Cause I haven't had a tank running for a couple of years and need advice. I understand the process of the nitrogen cycle your bio filer media and gravel act as breeding ground for good bacteria that will break down ammonia that the fish produce into nitrites then into nitrates (less harmful but still harmful in high amounts) into harmful biproducts.
Even though this explanation is simple there are a lot of methods out there on solving the issue of keeping the perfect parameters of your tanks. I believe the more water you have ( the bigger the tank), it is easier to maintain because you have more media- more good bacteria, easier imo to stabilize the quality of the tank's water. As well as less water changes up to 3+ months without one. But water changes are essential mainly to syphon out debris collected at the bottom but to also to sypon out the bad water as I call it, where the filter can not reach. Unless you want a brackish environment and your tank acts more like a lake than a constant flowing river. I just want to say the largest tank I cycled was a 30gal so I can not say from experience on the larger tanks. Only from trial and error and what I have learned from participating in forums.
Lastly I feel with 5.5 gal, it is much easier for things to go wrong then an established 20+ gal because of the small amount of water. The bio media alone can not keep up with the bio load, thus water changes are necessary.

The reason I posted this thread was to get advice from other hobbyist like yourselfs about my 5.5 gal. I don't need a debate on what is from fact or from experience of larger tanks, and what is right or wrong about maintaining them! Unless your opinions can help me with my questions great, if not could you please have a private message among yourselfs.

Thank you
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Old 03-26-2012, 10:16 AM   #45
 
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[quote=madyotto;1025179]

you called me a lire by saying you have to do water changes to keep the chemistry right
I did not directly or indirectly call you a liar at all..water changes remove items in the water column we cannot see or test for.

THAT all but most keepers do changes as PART OF there routine

and not the routine OF THERE water chemistry

telling people to do weekly or monthly changes leave those with the right conditions and water chemistry causing un-needed stress
It is not about having just the right conditions, it is about keeping those conditions at optimum levels for your fish, which can only be achieved with the necessity to do water changes. I would be creating more stress for my fish living in an environment with high nitrates caused by their pee/poop being broken down to the least toxic form for fish.

but by encouraging others (where possible) to create an environment that can handle nitrates quite well will only aid there downfalls - This is why we encourage people to cycle their tank and create a population of bacteria capable of withstanding the bioload of the fish we stock. By creating this bacteria, then adding fish slowly, we allow that population of bacteria to increase as we add more fish. An exception to this is using the ammonia fishless cycle method, once complete in relation to your tank size, the bacteria population is such a greater level than can be achieved with fish alone, it allows a FULL stocking of the tank once the cycle is complete.

Nitrate removal can be achieved primarily from water changes reducing them with the freshwater / saltwater added, or by having a large planted tank allowing the plants to assimilate ammonia before it converts to nitrite and then nitrate. This is scientific fact and something which cannot be questioned. The only other way to achieve nitrate reduction is my using chemical additives, which if used incorrectly according to manufacturing instructions would cause problems in our tanks. Scientists created the chemicals we use to be used as instructed, if we chose not to use them as such. Then we are the ones responsible for any bad outcomes which may come as a result of that.

In my small saltwater tank (29g) yes it is more of a challenge to create an environment stable for the fish, my nitrates are still low (removed with chaeto and culpera algae in my sump), phosphates are removed with my protein skimmer. I still have to change water once a week to keep those conditions at optimum levels needed for the fish. Same applies to freshwater as well.
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Old 03-26-2012, 10:27 AM   #46
 
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My apology Katibre this thread has indeed gone over what you requested as per your original question.

The fish you have is not suitable for that size tank, however their are steps you can take to create a better environment for the fish, until such time (soon preferably) that you are able to acquire another tank (check craiglist if you are in the US), many tank can found on there for very little. If you are unable to purchase another tank, then returning the fish to your local fish store is the only real option. The store will likely give you a store credit, which you can use to purchase fish more suited to your tank.

If there is anything else, we can offer assistance to you with then, please do not hesitate to ask. This discussion will continue as per your question.
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Old 03-26-2012, 02:12 PM   #47
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katibre View Post
Come on guys I've only asked a few simple questions about the maintaince of a 5.5 gal! Cause I haven't had a tank running for a couple of years and need advice. I understand the process of the nitrogen cycle your bio filer media and gravel act as breeding ground for good bacteria that will break down ammonia that the fish produce into nitrites then into nitrates (less harmful but still harmful in high amounts) into harmful biproducts.
Even though this explanation is simple there are a lot of methods out there on solving the issue of keeping the perfect parameters of your tanks. I believe the more water you have ( the bigger the tank), it is easier to maintain because you have more media- more good bacteria, easier imo to stabilize the quality of the tank's water. As well as less water changes up to 3+ months without one. But water changes are essential mainly to syphon out debris collected at the bottom but to also to sypon out the bad water as I call it, where the filter can not reach. Unless you want a brackish environment and your tank acts more like a lake than a constant flowing river. I just want to say the largest tank I cycled was a 30gal so I can not say from experience on the larger tanks. Only from trial and error and what I have learned from participating in forums.
Lastly I feel with 5.5 gal, it is much easier for things to go wrong then an established 20+ gal because of the small amount of water. The bio media alone can not keep up with the bio load, thus water changes are necessary.

The reason I posted this thread was to get advice from other hobbyist like yourselfs about my 5.5 gal. I don't need a debate on what is from fact or from experience of larger tanks, and what is right or wrong about maintaining them! Unless your opinions can help me with my questions great, if not could you please have a private message among yourselfs.

Thank you

like we all but all agreed on test for ammonia and nitrates if they are ok use YOUR own judgement on how the water it's self is doing if u feel it need a change even when the chemistry is right

i would personally advise that providing your test readings are ok to change the water every 2-3 weeks if it remains a worry of yours
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Old 03-28-2012, 01:01 PM   #48
 
Well 2 out of 3 of my feeder guppies have died. Both of my nitrite and nitrate tested 0 any thought why they would die?
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Old 03-28-2012, 06:30 PM   #49
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katibre View Post
Well 2 out of 3 of my feeder guppies have died. Both of my nitrite and nitrate tested 0 any thought why they would die?

Your original question was were you overstocked. The answer was that your tank was not suitable for the fish you had. Do you still have the Rainbow in the tank? If so, that may have been a stressor that could have killed 2 of the guppies. A rainbow is a large and very active fish, and the other fish may have been stressed or had any other type of illness, that may have caused it to die. Sometimes you just don't know.

Gwen
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Old 03-28-2012, 06:40 PM   #50
 
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also need to know your ammonia... and how do you know your nitrite and nitrate were 0? If you used strips, then you probably have, at minimum, some nitrate. Strips are worse than useless- they sometimes give you a false sense of security.
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