Why isn't Terra Fin PH Decrease lowering tank PH? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 6 Old 02-16-2012, 10:19 AM Thread Starter
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Why isn't Terra Fin PH Decrease lowering tank PH?

This aquarium was set up three weeks ago. Water and gravel from an existing tank were added at set up and it went through the normal bacteria bloom/cycle. The ph is reading at over 7.5. I have been adding Terra Fin PH Decreaser and it has gad no effect at all. Any suggestions?
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post #2 of 6 Old 02-16-2012, 12:00 PM
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Because PH adjusters rarely work, even if they do it simply destabilizes the tank. Dont use them.

Why do you want to lower the PH in your tank? there are ways to drop it a bit but it takes time and patience to do so without destabiliing the tank.
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post #3 of 6 Old 02-16-2012, 12:10 PM
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agreed, PH reducers don't work for long, since they can't overcome the hardness (buffers) of the water.

You pretty much have to use part distilled/Reverse osmosis water and dilute the hard water, or pick alkaline-loving fish. (there are lots)

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post #4 of 6 Old 02-16-2012, 12:26 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ladayen View Post
Because PH adjusters rarely work, even if they do it simply destabilizes the tank. Dont use them.

Why do you want to lower the PH in your tank? there are ways to drop it a bit but it takes time and patience to do so without destabiliing the tank.
The fish that I currently have show a recommended ph of 6-7.2. It is 7.5 or a little higher.
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post #5 of 6 Old 02-16-2012, 12:32 PM
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7.5 is fine. Your PH in the tank will drop a little bit over time anyhow. I would avoid wild caught fish that need a low PH though. Captive bred fish will be fine.
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post #6 of 6 Old 02-16-2012, 12:44 PM
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The hardness is as critical as the pH, and the two are connected.

Rather than my having to explain how, Mattr, have a read of this:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...quarium-73276/

Depending upon your GH and KH in the tap water, the pH may or may not lower naturally. Not suggesting you need to lower it, that is quite another matter; might coment further if I knew what fish you are considering.

Before any fish go in this tank, do some large water changes to get rid of the chemicals.

And, welcome to Tropical Fish Keeping forum.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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