Subtropical Species - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #1 of 14 Old 03-08-2008, 08:22 AM Thread Starter
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Subtropical Species

I've noticed recently a number of posts on this forum and others, where certain subtropical fish are being mistaken for normal tropical fish. I've therefore decided to give a short list of some of the subtropical species available in the aquarium trade, and a link to where I got information on some of the less obvious species.

For these species temperatures between 18-22 Celcius, or 64-72 F is essential. When the tempreatures are too high their metabolism speeds up and they tend to be more susceptable to disease and stress and have a shortened lifespan. They are less able to cope well with the decrease in oxygen found in warmer waters. Equally however they are not suited to temperatures that are too cold like true coldwater species are, so it's important to still keep an eye on the thermometer during winter time, and provide a heater at the lowest setting if necessary.

Some of the species are:

Corydoras paleatus (peppered cory)
Tanichthys albonubes (white cloud mountain minnow)
Barbus conchonius (rosy barb)
Barbus semifasciolatus (green barb)
Macropodus opercularis (paradise fish)
Gastromyzon punctulatus (hillstream loach)
Gambusia affinis holbrooki (mosquito fish)

Some others that I came across at this link that i didn't initially think of or know off:

Barbus gelius (dwarf golden barb)
Heterandria formosa (dwarf mosquito fish)
Xiphophorus variatus (variatus platy)
Aphanius iberus (spanish kilifish)
Enneacanthus chaetodon (black banded sunfish)
Salaria fluvialitis (FW blenny)
Rhinogobius duospilus (dragon goby)


Some goldfish, more so the fancy varieties, are able to withstand subtropical temperatures also, though best kept at the lower range.

The link: http://www.wetwebmedia.com

Hope this was useful to somebody. :)
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post #2 of 14 Old 03-08-2008, 09:01 AM Thread Starter
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Too late to edit, so just adding.

Corydoras paleatus and Xiphophorus variatus can withstand slightly higher temperatures than the rest of up to 24oC comfortably.
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post #3 of 14 Old 03-08-2008, 01:54 PM
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Good heads up to do more homework Falina. I went to planetcatfish to look at paleatus and sure enough they were colder than I would have expected but they had them to 75F. Then I did some research on platies and found their range stops at about 77F. Both are colder than I would have expected but not qiite as cool as you indicated. I would have kept either one as high as 80 but thanks to you I now know better. Its a great reminder that just because fish are called tropical, not all require the same temperatures.
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post #4 of 14 Old 03-08-2008, 06:59 PM Thread Starter
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Hi ghreed.

The platy I mentioned is a specific species of platy. As far as i know (though I'm happy to be proven wrong) the regular platy that you see in lfs's most of the time is a regular tropical fish like any other. Though it's very hard to say with livebearers because there is so much random breeding that there are very few pure strains available. And it's becoming rarer to find even a pure platy of any species because many have been bred with swordtails somewhere down the line. Hope this makes it a bit clearer for you.
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post #5 of 14 Old 03-08-2008, 07:15 PM
I would like to suggest, Falina that you put together a complete list that we could use as a sticky. I think it would be a neat deal.
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post #6 of 14 Old 03-08-2008, 07:24 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Bob. I will do just that soon as I have some time, which should be in the next couple of days. :)
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post #7 of 14 Old 03-08-2008, 10:07 PM
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Rhinogobius duospilus used to be R. wui - the White Cheeked Goby. True that it's subtropical. Dragon Goby is more often used these days to refer to Gobioides brousonnetti, the Violet goby. Not point in getting bet out of shape over common names, but I thought it would be good to get the other common name for that one out there, as well as the obsolete scientific name.

One that I figured to see and didn't: Weather Loach (even though I keep mine in a tropical tank. )

There've got to be more than that too. Lets see. Sclerostymax barbatus, Sailfin Mollies (wild form), Texas Cichlids, Everglades pygmy sunfish, Jordanella floridae (American-Flag Fish), Celestial Pearl Danio/Galaxy Rasbora, A number of snakehead species (as fishing the Potomac lately has demonstrated). Violet gobies are found as far up the coast as North Carolina, so they could be kept at subtropical temps. The under-appreciated native fish, the madtom - North America's answer to the cory cat. Channel Catfish. I think some of the danio species are tolerant of subtropical temps (Pearl?), and some additional loaches too.

OK, I think I have run out of ones I can throw off the top of my head.

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post #8 of 14 Old 03-09-2008, 12:10 PM
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thank you for this.
makes for interesting reading, :)
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post #9 of 14 Old 03-09-2008, 09:08 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tophat665
Rhinogobius duospilus used to be R. wui - the White Cheeked Goby. True that it's subtropical. Dragon Goby is more often used these days to refer to Gobioides brousonnetti, the Violet goby. Not point in getting bet out of shape over common names, but I thought it would be good to get the other common name for that one out there, as well as the obsolete scientific name.

One that I figured to see and didn't: Weather Loach (even though I keep mine in a tropical tank. )

There've got to be more than that too. Lets see. Sclerostymax barbatus, Sailfin Mollies (wild form), Texas Cichlids, Everglades pygmy sunfish, Jordanella floridae (American-Flag Fish), Celestial Pearl Danio/Galaxy Rasbora, A number of snakehead species (as fishing the Potomac lately has demonstrated). Violet gobies are found as far up the coast as North Carolina, so they could be kept at subtropical temps. The under-appreciated native fish, the madtom - North America's answer to the cory cat. Channel Catfish. I think some of the danio species are tolerant of subtropical temps (Pearl?), and some additional loaches too.

OK, I think I have run out of ones I can throw off the top of my head.
Thanks for that Tophat. I'm making a more complete list like Bob asked for a sticky just now so I'll be sure to make sure I have all your suggestions in it as well. Of course I will give you an acknowledgement for any on your list that I've missed.

Thanks again.
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post #10 of 14 Old 03-10-2008, 12:49 AM
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Neat idea, Julie!

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