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stocking help for 15 gallon

This is a discussion on stocking help for 15 gallon within the Freshwater and Tropical Fish forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by Byron Water changes are absolutely the most important aspect of keeping a healthy aquarium. You may not "see" something, but the ...

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stocking help for 15 gallon
Old 06-12-2011, 04:52 AM   #11
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Water changes are absolutely the most important aspect of keeping a healthy aquarium. You may not "see" something, but the fish feel it. They will be healthier if you changed some water every week, and about 30%. There is so much scientific evidence to support this, I will say no more. Your fish's health and lifespan are worth it.
i believe you, since you're the fish expert is 30% an average water change quantity then? it just sounded like a lot to me. but i did some quick calculations in my head, and for my tank it'd only be about a bucket and a half of water. the thing is i usually stop syphoning once i've filled the bucket to the brim (there have been times where it's even overflowed because i wasn't keeping an eye on it!) and unless the tank's really dirty (i usually syphon off dead leaves and fish droppings and stuff at the same time as the water change) i don't change more than that.
on another topic, i've been playing around with different stocking combinations of AqAdvisor, and it actually seems like 6 cherry barbs and 6 glowlight tetras would be ok if i kept 4 panda corys as my bottom-feeders instead of a bristlenose. i would really love to have corys, but apart from my bad experience with my last ones (also pandas), i'm a bit worried about the gravel. i got a small sized gravel with the intention of having a suitable substrate for corys, but even though it's fairly fine (i think it's 4 mm - finest i could get), it's also quite sharp and i'm sure that wouldn't be good for their barbels. my last corys died of something that rotted away their barbels :( mind you, the tank was cycling at the time. bad idea. hehe
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Old 06-12-2011, 12:38 PM   #12
 
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As I mentioned, water changes should be every week without fail. The amount changed can vary depending upon the aquarium. More fish or larger fish means more water needs changing; live plants means less water subject to the fish load again. I think aiming for 30% is good.

Corydoras panda are very sensitive corys. Considering they are tank raised now, it is interesting that they are still one of the most sensitive species. I have several wild-caught Cory species that have given me absolutely no issue, but over the years I have lost several panda. And definitely not a fish for a new tank; once a tank is well established, they tend to settle in much better.
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Old 06-13-2011, 02:14 AM   #13
 
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
As I mentioned, water changes should be every week without fail. The amount changed can vary depending upon the aquarium. More fish or larger fish means more water needs changing; live plants means less water subject to the fish load again. I think aiming for 30% is good.

Corydoras panda are very sensitive corys. Considering they are tank raised now, it is interesting that they are still one of the most sensitive species. I have several wild-caught Cory species that have given me absolutely no issue, but over the years I have lost several panda. And definitely not a fish for a new tank; once a tank is well established, they tend to settle in much better.
yeah, you're right about them being more sensitive, the hardiest fish i've ever kept were peppered corys and they survived several cycling tanks and a lot of poor water conditions, as opposed to my last corys, poor little things :( are pandas also smaller than the average cory? because on AqAdvisor the stocking level goes up if you replace 4 pandas with 4 of another species of cory.
my tank's planted and i am a firm believer in the benefits of live plants, actually i plan to never have an aquarium without them from now on. it makes cycling so much easier, and they help keep things level once the tank's established.
mine tank's been running for about a year now, but i'm not sure if i'd feel comfortable keeping pandas if they're sensitive, even though they are one of my favorite kinds of cory. would keeping another species of cory be ok, or would the bioload be more? (like i said, pandas are small corys aren't they...)
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Old 06-13-2011, 12:55 PM   #14
 
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yeah, you're right about them being more sensitive, the hardiest fish i've ever kept were peppered corys and they survived several cycling tanks and a lot of poor water conditions, as opposed to my last corys, poor little things :( are pandas also smaller than the average cory? because on AqAdvisor the stocking level goes up if you replace 4 pandas with 4 of another species of cory.
my tank's planted and i am a firm believer in the benefits of live plants, actually i plan to never have an aquarium without them from now on. it makes cycling so much easier, and they help keep things level once the tank's established.
mine tank's been running for about a year now, but i'm not sure if i'd feel comfortable keeping pandas if they're sensitive, even though they are one of my favorite kinds of cory. would keeping another species of cory be ok, or would the bioload be more? (like i said, pandas are small corys aren't they...)
Panda do tend to remain fairly small. I have seen some refer to them as one of the "dwarfs" though this is misleading. As noted in the profile, they can attain 2 inches but usually remain smaller. I have a couple of times seen 2-inch panda in stores, but mine which I've had now for more than 2 years are still quite small, about 1.25 inches.

A group of any of the "normal" species is fine for you. I would get five.
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Old 06-13-2011, 01:33 PM   #15
 
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Similarly to Bryon I tend to see a pandas stay on the smaller side. One of my largest pandas just makes 2". I have had her for over three years now.

:)

Natalie
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Old 06-14-2011, 04:30 AM   #16
 
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thanks both of you! quite excited about getting corys again (i think i'll get peppered corys, as they're my fave, but i'll just see what the shop has in case i like the look of one of the other common species better.) for some reason keeping uneven numbers of fish makes me feel a little uneasy (every time i've done it one of them has always died lol) i know that sounds stupid though haha. so i might go with 4.
anyway, for now i think i'll start by getting 4 glowlight tetras and see how they settle in. don't want to add more than 4 smallish fish at a time really, so i'll wait until the good bacteria catch up with the bioload and then maybe get 2 more, and 2 more cherry barbs. and then i'll see about the corys :)
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Old 06-14-2011, 11:29 AM   #17
 
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thanks both of you! quite excited about getting corys again (i think i'll get peppered corys, as they're my fave, but i'll just see what the shop has in case i like the look of one of the other common species better.) for some reason keeping uneven numbers of fish makes me feel a little uneasy (every time i've done it one of them has always died lol) i know that sounds stupid though haha. so i might go with 4.
anyway, for now i think i'll start by getting 4 glowlight tetras and see how they settle in. don't want to add more than 4 smallish fish at a time really, so i'll wait until the good bacteria catch up with the bioload and then maybe get 2 more, and 2 more cherry barbs. and then i'll see about the corys :)
I believe there are live plants, so I strongly recommend 6 glowlights at once. Fish added together, in larger numbers, always fare better, it takes them less time to settle in, safety in numbers, etc. It is also better with respect to the relationship between the fish in the group. I always add complete groups when adding a new species to a tank.
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Old 06-14-2011, 11:46 AM   #18
 
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I would reccomend the bronze cory. They're quite hardy (for a cory).
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Old 06-15-2011, 03:44 AM   #19
 
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thanks byron , if you think getting 6 at once is ok i will, but because i'm not COMPLETELY sure what other fish i'm getting yet, i wanted to keep the numbers down in case i'll end up with too many otherwise.

bronze corys were my first corys :) i like the peppereds though, and they are extremely hardy (well at least judging from the ones i kept lol.)
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Old 06-15-2011, 07:34 PM   #20
 
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Originally Posted by dorabaker View Post
thanks byron , if you think getting 6 at once is ok i will, but because i'm not COMPLETELY sure what other fish i'm getting yet, i wanted to keep the numbers down in case i'll end up with too many otherwise.

bronze corys were my first corys :) i like the peppereds though, and they are extremely hardy (well at least judging from the ones i kept lol.)
I may be mis-understanidng, but in case not, I must coment. One should never acquire fish unless you absolutely want them, and then make sure they are in the proper numbers so they will be provided with what nature meant them to have. Characins, including all the tetra, need a group, and while six is bandied about as the minimum, even more is better. If you don't want 6-7 glowlight tetra, please do not buy 4. The fish will be "happier" and thus healthier and more likely to live a normal life if they are in a larger group. The fish deserve no less.
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