Spawning Farlowella (Twig Catfish) - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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post #11 of 96 Old 07-27-2010, 02:02 PM
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That is amazing. Great pictures. What happened to the eggs from last week? I see the black eggs left as you staed, but what about the rest? Did they get eaten or were they not fertilized? Did you find out how long until Farlowella eggs hatch?
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post #12 of 96 Old 07-27-2010, 02:07 PM
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hey byron
in due time if there's any success can i buy 3 from you or would shipping to the states be to pricey?
thanks
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post #13 of 96 Old 07-27-2010, 03:05 PM Thread Starter
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Lisa, hatching time is 6-10 days, today is day 8. As for the others, they have slowly disappeared. The male goes over them mouthing them periodically but does not seem to "eat" them. Don't know if other fish do at night, or if they fall off, or hatch. I think they were all fertilized because the dark "dot" turned into a dark line in all that were there and this over the week expanded until the eggs were as they appear now. Can't detect any motion inside them.

onefish2fish, I'm letting nature takes its course so I expect if they do hatch something will eat them, depending when it is. At night the fry might disappear into plants and survive. Fry of various fish in this tank do survive now and then. I wouldn't want to risk shipping, I sent some plants Air Express to California, took over a week and they all died.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #14 of 96 Old 07-27-2010, 03:08 PM
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Quite interesting, to say the least. I'm curious to know if the parents protect their young, or if they are on their own once they are free-swimming.
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post #15 of 96 Old 07-27-2010, 07:41 PM Thread Starter
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Quite interesting, to say the least. I'm curious to know if the parents protect their young, or if they are on their own once they are free-swimming.
The reports Ihave read indicate that the male guards the eggs and the fry until they are free swimming. After the eggs hatch, the fry remain to absorb the yolk sac which is about five more days before they are free-swimming. It is very difficult to feed the fry, which need the softest and smallest of plant matter. If some get down among the thick plants, a few might survive.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #16 of 96 Old 08-09-2010, 02:14 PM
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Was just thinking of your thread. Have you spotted any surviving Farlowella?
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post #17 of 96 Old 08-09-2010, 02:55 PM Thread Starter
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There were two spawnings as you know. The second set of eggs have been developing; yesterday morning when I went in, they were all gone. I've no idea if they all hatched, or (more likely) something got them during the night. Almost 3 weeks there were eggs on the glass with the male guarding them. If they did hatch, the fry presumably would be down among plants somewhere.

Today I noticed a very rotund female on that same glass, with the male close by, so I am thinking another spawning is in the offing.

I also have interesting behaviour among the Characidium fasciatum, one of the fish is very rotund, presumably a female, and "she" has been interacting quite a lot with two of the thinner presumably-male fish. Lots of what I call sparring--very fast darting at each other, spinning around, sidling up, etc.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #18 of 96 Old 08-09-2010, 03:09 PM
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Wow, 3 weeks? That's a long time for eggs. I guess every species is different. Maybe in the coming weeks you'll see small Farlowella. That would be neat. Is the Characidium fasciatum an egg scatterer?
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post #19 of 96 Old 08-09-2010, 03:49 PM Thread Starter
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Wow, 3 weeks? That's a long time for eggs. I guess every species is different. Maybe in the coming weeks you'll see small Farlowella. That would be neat. Is the Characidium fasciatum an egg scatterer?
Baensch/Riehl say the eggs will fall among plants and gravel.

There were 2 batches of eggs, so the 3 weeks overlaps; it takes 6-10 days to hatch, and these last eggs that "disappeared" yesterday were the second spawning. The eggs from the first spawning "disappeared" around last Tuesday. Once they hatch, it takes 5 days for the fry to absorb the yolk sac before they are free swimming.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #20 of 96 Old 08-09-2010, 03:51 PM
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Did you see any wigglers before that or did the eggs themselves just disappear?
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