Scientific Evidence of Benefits of Shoaling Fish kept in groups
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Scientific Evidence of Benefits of Shoaling Fish kept in groups

This is a discussion on Scientific Evidence of Benefits of Shoaling Fish kept in groups within the Freshwater and Tropical Fish forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> We've been advocating maintaining shoaling fish (tetras, angelfish, barbs, rasbora, corydoras, etc) in groups of 6 or more for some time; apparently this has ...

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Scientific Evidence of Benefits of Shoaling Fish kept in groups
Old 07-09-2010, 01:48 PM   #1
 
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Scientific Evidence of Benefits of Shoaling Fish kept in groups

We've been advocating maintaining shoaling fish (tetras, angelfish, barbs, rasbora, corydoras, etc) in groups of 6 or more for some time; apparently this has never been scientifically studied--until now. Here's a link to an article from Practical Fishkeeping about a study that confirmed that larger groups of these fish have less stress and (in some cases) significantly less aggression.

http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.u...m_content=html

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Old 07-09-2010, 03:02 PM   #2
 
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this is how they live in the wild. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWIVCdLOImw
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Old 07-09-2010, 05:40 PM   #3
 
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I read this article as well.I agree with one reader who commented that they should have used larger groups in larger tanks as well.Overall a good piece that proves that having groups does serve a purpose and is more in keeping with natural behavior.
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Old 07-10-2010, 02:49 AM   #4
 
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+one, Have always thought that large groups are much more appealing, and they do appear to appreciate being in large groups as well.
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Old 07-10-2010, 05:22 AM   #5
 
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yup coz although they are hand bred they still have their natural inborn instinct.
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Old 07-10-2010, 07:31 AM   #6
 
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Neat article, although I wonder at the accuracy they could have attained by doing larger group studies. 10 litres is not much, and 5 angels seems small if you're trying to demonstrate"shoaling'" behavior.I'd be curious if they got different results in a larger tank with larger groups.
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Old 07-13-2010, 05:37 AM   #7
 
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Agreed, especially since, in the case of things like tiger barbs, you often find that even six or eight fish isn't enough to really alleviate the problems associated with having too few fish in the shoal. I'd like to see them use 55g tanks and groups of 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 12, 20 and 30 barbs (though I guess their metrics would be pretty useless with just one fish).
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