Reaquascaping 20 gallon high
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Reaquascaping 20 gallon high

This is a discussion on Reaquascaping 20 gallon high within the Freshwater and Tropical Fish forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> So I just got a tank from my sister. Well her stocking is aweful so i am returning some fish. Stocking: x3 Corydoras x2 ...

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Reaquascaping 20 gallon high
Old 05-30-2012, 11:12 PM   #1
 
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Exclamation Reaquascaping 20 gallon high

So I just got a tank from my sister. Well her stocking is aweful so i am returning some fish.
Stocking:
x3 Corydoras
x2 Honey gourami (Going Back)
x1 Bolivian Ram
x1 Platy
x1 Bristelnose (Going back)
x1 Flying fox (Going back)
Also it was not really planted once I got it removed all the plastic crap. Cut all the plastic plant off the decor. Added water sprite just to get nitrates down. So the plan is to replace the gravel and get new plants. I am thinking either black gravel or pool filter sand. Does anyone have suggestions on substrate preferably between those two. Also planning on buying tons of plants. Suggestions on plants. Preferably ones that can grow in 20 watt lighting. Also suggestions on stocking?
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Old 05-31-2012, 11:15 AM   #2
 
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Fine black gravel will work, if you don't mind the expense (this stuff is quite expensive, though a 20g will perhaps not break the piggy-bank like a 4 or 5-foot tank would); a grain size of 1-2 mm. Coarse sand is fine, I now have it in 5 of my 7 tanks, and I use Quikrete play sand from Home Depot; a bag at $6 will give you plenty. If you can get black pool filter sand, fine; but not the normal white which is way too bright for the fish. Quikrete Play Sand is basically identical in appearance to the natural Amazonian stream sands.

I agree with losing the indicated fish; the Bolivian Ram may also be problematic in so small a space. Mine is in the 5-foot 115g tank and he definitely rules that space.

Plants. With a single T8 "daylight" tube with around 6500K, you will be OK with pygmy chain sword, any of the small crypt species (several are in the profiles), Anubias, Java Fern, Java Moss. Brazilian Pennywort is a distinctive stem plant that will manage with low/moderate light. Water Sprite floating is ideal.

Byron.
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Old 06-04-2012, 08:09 PM   #3
 
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Thanks Byron,
Have you ever Kept non-annual Killies? Specifically the Clown Killifish or the Gardneri Killifish? If so what size tank do you recommend? and do you know how old they live?
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Old 06-04-2012, 08:25 PM   #4
 
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Originally Posted by es31710 View Post
Thanks Byron,
Have you ever Kept non-annual Killies? Specifically the Clown Killifish or the Gardneri Killifish? If so what size tank do you recommend? and do you know how old they live?
I haven't had these yet, have thought of the Clown when I saw them in a local store. The Clown, Epiplatys annulatus, should have a 10g minimum tank, very well planted with floating plants especially, this is a surface fish. The Gardneri, Fundulopanchax garderi garderi, the same minimum 10g.

Neither are annual killifish, but I've no idea as to lifespan; the Gardneri is said to be longer lived than many killifish.
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Old 06-04-2012, 08:30 PM   #5
 
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Ok thanks. I saw them at Oddball aquatics and I really liked the way they look. I was think about adding a smaller tetra to the 20 taking out the bolivian ram and adding Gardneri but I didn't know if they would eat them.
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Old 06-04-2012, 08:33 PM   #6
 
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Originally Posted by es31710 View Post
Ok thanks. I saw them at Oddball aquatics and I really liked the way they look. I was think about adding a smaller tetra to the 20 taking out the bolivian ram and adding Gardneri but I didn't know if they would eat them.
Killies are not always peaceful... so research well. Here is some reliable data on both species written by my biologist friend Matt Ford in the UK.

Epiplatys annulatus (Clown Killifish) — Seriously Fish

Fundulopanchax gardneri gardneri (Steel-blue Killifish) — Seriously Fish
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Old 06-04-2012, 09:34 PM   #7
 
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That is what I was concerned about I think the clowns will be fine but I am not sure about the Gardneri's.
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Old 06-04-2012, 09:57 PM   #8
 
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Clown killies and Fundulopanchax like gardneris are best kept in a species tank. The good news is they can be extremely small tanks, like those 2.5 gallon glass tanks you probably walk past without noticing at the store.

The other thing about killies is that they jump. I had a Aphyosemion striatum disappear through the smallest of gaps. She is gone, you don't hide for long in a 2.5-gallon tank. Best bet for lids are actually the metal repitiles screens because the corners are notched and you can slip tubing and power cords through without leaving any gaps.

In fact, one killi collector I met actually observed a killi leave the water, hide out on shore until a predator gave up, then flopped back into the water. It's not as suicidal an instinct as it seems.
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Old 06-04-2012, 10:45 PM   #9
 
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Ok so what your saying is they will not do good with fish like neons I am asking being I have never kept Killies before.
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Old 06-04-2012, 10:57 PM   #10
 
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The Pseudepiplatys annulatus (clown killies) might be okay with neons, but you may have to target feed them or the neons could out-compete them for food. Gardeneri I'm not sure. You can try, and if it doesn't work, net them out and put them into their own container. That's the way you eventually become the wise old guy in the fish club who knows everything.

RE: being new to killies, it's not as easy to become familiar with them as it is with other fish. That's partly because there are very few common names, and also because there aren't that many people keeping them, so it's harder than normal to get quality advice.

The best thing you can do is try to find somebody local who keeps killis, and if you are lucky, there is a branch of the AKA nearby where you can get your hands on them. Killis are a lot of fun, partly because few people keep them, and partly because they are so colorful. Just keep trying to learn and eventually it'll come.
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