NEW To PLECO'S
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Freshwater and Tropical Fish » NEW To PLECO'S

NEW To PLECO'S

This is a discussion on NEW To PLECO'S within the Freshwater and Tropical Fish forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> So im new to owning a Clown pleco and was wondering do clown plecos or plecos in general have a large bio load? Thanks ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Reticulated Cory
Reticulated Cory
Leopold Angelfish
Leopold Angelfish
Reply
Old 06-03-2011, 01:48 PM   #1
 
Question NEW To PLECO'S

So im new to owning a Clown pleco and was wondering do clown plecos or plecos in general have a large bio load?

Thanks
Jep
jeppun21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2011, 03:14 PM   #2
 
ElectricBlueJackDempsey's Avatar
 
Yes, plecos are notorious for having a very large bio load. With a clown pleco, you should have much problems because they stay small.
ElectricBlueJackDempsey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2011, 03:21 PM   #3
 
Oh ok.. cause i feed my clown pleco algea wafers and shrimp pellets.. and wow is der a lot of black string of stool everywhere...lol but it isnt bad...

Thanks jep
jeppun21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2011, 03:30 PM   #4
 
SeaHorse's Avatar
 
Pleco's and Goldfish are the biggest poopers. Yes big bio load and that dictates how many fish you can put in your tank.
They also like it when you boil/blanch zucinni and broccoli and after cooling it, drop it in the tank. yummy veggies. Which means mine eats all of the live plaints I try to put in the tank... even the floating ones, she swam upside down on the surface to steal those too!! (I was told the females have less wiskers, mine has none)
SeaHorse is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to SeaHorse For This Useful Post:
jeppun21 (06-03-2011)
Old 06-03-2011, 03:52 PM   #5
 
what would u thnk an alternative bottom feeder would be with less bio load.. a whiptail catfish or oto?
jeppun21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2011, 05:00 PM   #6
 
SeaHorse's Avatar
 
I've only ever had one Pleco in the tank. I love my Cory's. I've heard that Otto's are hard to raise/keep alive. Algae eater or large snail? I have one snail in my 10 gallon Betta tank and man can that little thing clean up!!
SeaHorse is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to SeaHorse For This Useful Post:
jeppun21 (06-03-2011)
Old 06-03-2011, 06:01 PM   #7
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Jep, assuming you are looking for some interest on the substrate (as opposed to fish eating leftovers), the Whiptail Catfish is a good fish. Check the info in the profile (click on the shaded name). Corys as Jackiebaby mentioned are certainly interesting. Oto catfish tend not to be on the substrate except when feeding from sinking foods, they spend their time on plant leaves, wood, even the tank walls, grazing algae. They need a group (as do corys). Loaches are interesting substrate fish, but they tend to need large tanks as most are 4-5 inches for smaller species and the others are much larger, and they need a group.

Last edited by Byron; 06-03-2011 at 06:27 PM..
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Byron For This Useful Post:
jeppun21 (06-03-2011)
Old 06-03-2011, 06:02 PM   #8
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeppun21 View Post
what would u thnk an alternative bottom feeder would be with less bio load.. a whiptail catfish or oto?
I have panda corys, a whiptail and ottos. all lovely fish with less bioload than a plec (though corys and ottos need to be in groups of 4+, which increases your total tank bioload (but you have a nice shoal of fish to look at). I wouldn't really class ottos as bottom feeders as they spend most of there time resting and feeding on surfaces in the mid-level
sik80 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to sik80 For This Useful Post:
jeppun21 (06-03-2011)
Old 06-03-2011, 06:19 PM   #9
 
thanks byron.. Yeah my single pleco just has a big bioload.. Im maybe thnking of putting him in a 40 gallon i just bought so he has more room... Probably gonna get that whiptail catfish... Are they hard to take care of and do they produce less bio load then the plecos

thanks
jep
jeppun21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2011, 06:30 PM   #10
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeppun21 View Post
thanks byron.. Yeah my single pleco just has a big bioload.. Im maybe thnking of putting him in a 40 gallon i just bought so he has more room... Probably gonna get that whiptail catfish... Are they hard to take care of and do they produce less bio load then the plecos

thanks
jep
Check the profile for care needs. No, they are pretty easy going, and can live for many years. They like algae/spirulina/kelp based sinking foods, and will eat any common green algae they find. They are actually very thin for their length, so they have a very small impact on the bio load (and produce very little waste).
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How can you tell Pleco's are getting enough to eat? Pep Catfish 2 03-01-2010 03:03 PM
pleco's mastermindc3pro Freshwater and Tropical Fish 9 12-13-2009 07:45 PM
Can't Keep Pleco's Alive! Help! 9311dan Tropical Fish Diseases 8 01-11-2009 03:25 AM
Help, something wrong with my pleco's nofinga911 Tropical Fish Diseases 8 10-02-2007 12:08 PM
Do Pleco's Do Good With Bricks? koolman56 Catfish 6 01-09-2007 06:42 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:58 PM.