Kh and gh.. I'm doomed to fail? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 4 Old 10-02-2011, 04:17 AM Thread Starter
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Question Kh and gh.. I'm doomed to fail?

I am looking to start a tropical community fish tank. I just set up my 75g tank and I am about to cycle it. When I was buying up gear I got a test kit for GH and KH. I tested my tap water and found that KH was at 10 and gh is 16. My ph is at 7.6.


I have a 20g community tank, it was my starter tank and all I ever got for it was very hardy fish. But with this new tank I am going to get fish that from what I have read need closer attention to water perimeters. I would give you a list of fish but I am still in the planing stage. But from what I have read with really hard water my selection of fish is limited.


So my questions are..
how hard is it to prep RO water from the local pet store for a tropical tank?
Or can I add some thing like peat moss or drift wood with carbon to help keep the water clear.
Or do nothing because I have read in some topics that unless you are breeding and as long as PH is stable these things are not as important as some web sites make it out to be.
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post #2 of 4 Old 10-02-2011, 08:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by folion View Post
I am looking to start a tropical community fish tank. I just set up my 75g tank and I am about to cycle it. When I was buying up gear I got a test kit for GH and KH. I tested my tap water and found that KH was at 10 and gh is 16. My ph is at 7.6.


I have a 20g community tank, it was my starter tank and all I ever got for it was very hardy fish. But with this new tank I am going to get fish that from what I have read need closer attention to water perimeters. I would give you a list of fish but I am still in the planing stage. But from what I have read with really hard water my selection of fish is limited.


So my questions are..
how hard is it to prep RO water from the local pet store for a tropical tank?
Or can I add some thing like peat moss or drift wood with carbon to help keep the water clear.
Or do nothing because I have read in some topics that unless you are breeding and as long as PH is stable these things are not as important as some web sites make it out to be.
I'm no expert on water, and I'm sure others will give you some advice, but here's what I can add. It is better to keep PH stable, than have it go up and down, but there are fish that will not live as long and are sensitive to water ph, so you do need to get that stable, but it will depend on what the fish are, so you'll need to list fish you are thinking about. I do RO water for a 23 gal I have, and ONLY use that water each time I do water changes, which costs me $2.50-$4.50 for 10 gal, depending on whether I get the water at "Water to Go", here in Abq, or the Glacier water machine. They both have a ph of 6.3-6.4. I'm doing this for German Rams. They are sensitive fish. Also, like you mentioned, using Malaysian drift wood is good for many reasons, including lowering ph, though if you did just that, with such a big tank like you have, that alone would not be enough, IMO. Peat and that will tint your water, which some people don't like. I don't use carbon, so I'm not sure if carbon will "clear" the water from tannins, but I doubt it. 75 gal is a big tank to try to do WC's with purchased water. You could get an RO system in your house. Best of luck

Gwen

Just because animals can't talk, does not mean they should not be heard
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post #3 of 4 Old 10-02-2011, 01:36 PM
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I concur with Gwen. Assuming those numbers are dGH and dKH (and not ppm), that is fairly hard water. If you check through our fish profiles (second tab from the left in the blue bar across the top), hardness and pH ranges are given for each species. Where this is critical, it will say so. Generally, wild caught fish must be provided with parameters reasonably close to their preferences, while commercially-raised fish can be more adaptable, though this also varies with the species.

You can read more about the co-relation between hardness and pH, and some ways to safely and naturally soften/lower it, in this article:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...quarium-73276/

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #4 of 4 Old 10-03-2011, 03:13 PM
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your water would be great for livebearers, but not so good for angels or other south american cichlids. just look through the profiles like Byron said and you will find plenty that will work. and don't feel too bad, my tap water has a pH of 8.4. that is a lot harder to work with.

**I freely admit that most of the information I share I have learned from other people on this forum and am simply repeating. I thank you for sharing your knowledge and ask that if I say anything incorrect someone will kindly correct me**
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