I'm getting a 55 gallon tank for Fathers day.
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Freshwater and Tropical Fish » I'm getting a 55 gallon tank for Fathers day.

I'm getting a 55 gallon tank for Fathers day.

This is a discussion on I'm getting a 55 gallon tank for Fathers day. within the Freshwater and Tropical Fish forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Hi good people, I'm excited about finally getting a new tank. But I haven't kept fish in a little over thirty years, so I'm ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Mosquito Rasbora
Mosquito Rasbora
Banded Gourami
Banded Gourami
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
I'm getting a 55 gallon tank for Fathers day.
Old 03-13-2012, 06:57 PM   #1
 
I'm getting a 55 gallon tank for Fathers day.

Hi good people, I'm excited about finally getting a new tank. But I haven't kept fish in a little over thirty years, so I'm a little behind the times .But there's so many changes over the years, that I'm confused.

I've always loved angels and I want to keep them in a community tank with other fish that won't nip their fins, with live plants.

In the past I always had to wait for the gravel to get old and dirty before I could add live plants. Now I hear that you don't have to do that! I know that some live plants come in little pots that you stick in the gravel. Okay that's cool.

But I've been reading, and hearing about this new stuff. I heard that you don't even have to rinse this stuff. Just put it in the tank, and add plants, and water and away you go.

Now that just sounds almost to good to be true.

Now for the bad part. I've also heard it turns the tank muddy and black...

Okay, what I really want to know is, what's the real story on this stuff. Is it any good?

BTW I've also got a couple of other million other questions going through my mind.


Thanks
Carl
bigcarl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2012, 07:12 PM   #2
 
Boredomb's Avatar
 
Not sure how much stuff has changed in 30 years lol but as far as a planted tank. Well it is only as complicated ad you make it out to be. It doesn't have to be hard or even a waiting game as you mentioned. Plant need some 17 nutrients to grow. Some of these will come.from.your water,fish food,fertilizer and lights.
Not sure what this miracle "stuff" is but is domes like an enriched substrates like Eco-complete there is a few more but forgot the names of these. I would not waste your money on those. They do work but will cost more then regular gravel. Also they will be sharper and you might have problems with bottom dwellers if get any.
You can get the same results from regular gravel or even sand by just adding fertilizers. Which you will eventually have to do with the other substrates as well.
If you haven't read these four part sticky I would suggest reading these http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...um-part-34861/
They are a great start and full of lots of great information.
Boredomb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2012, 08:24 PM   #3
 
Byron's Avatar
 
I also think the enriched substrate is what you've heard about, and having it in one of my 7 tanks, I wouldn't waste the money again. For the setup you're planning, namely a 55g with a group of 5-6 angelfish and some tankmates and with nice moderate light plants, I would suggest very fine gravel or coarse sand. You can buy either in aquarium stores, if cost is not an issue; or find less expensive alternatives like play sand.

We have a fish and plant profile section, under the second tab from the left in the blue bar across the top of the page. If the name is used in a post identical to the profile, it will shade and you can click on it for that profile, example Scalare Angelfish or Pterophyllum scalare for the scientific name. There will usually be some suggestions for aquascaping, plus info on water parameters, tank sizes, compatibility, etc.

I'm attaching a photo of my 115g tank which though it doesn't happen to contain angelfish it is certainly aquascaped for them, using Echinodorus (sword) plants. A more "authentic" scape would be less plants (except lots of floating) and more wood branches. It's just one idea, and happens to have the playsand substrate I mentioned.

Last but not least, welcome to Tropical Fish Keeping forum. And welcome back to this fascinating hobby.

Byron.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 115g Feb 24-12.jpg (64.2 KB, 39 views)
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Byron For This Useful Post:
bigcarl (03-14-2012)
Old 03-14-2012, 11:30 AM   #4
 
Your tank is absolutely Beautiful. What can I say? I'm in awe. I like plain planted tanks, with natural gravel and a couple of pieces of drift wood. I don't care for colored gravel; marbles, sunken ships, deep sea divers. I like my tanks to look realistic, and your's is perfect. I'm jealous.

I've been looking around a few of the pet srores that sell fish. I'm surprised that I haven't seen any shale for sale, that was always a big thing, for making little lean toos for the cat fish, and other bottem feeders to hide in.

Thank You, for taking the time to reply to my post. I hope we can become friends and maybe pick your brain again in the future.

Carl
Carl
bigcarl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2012, 12:17 PM   #5
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigcarl View Post
Your tank is absolutely Beautiful. What can I say? I'm in awe. I like plain planted tanks, with natural gravel and a couple of pieces of drift wood. I don't care for colored gravel; marbles, sunken ships, deep sea divers. I like my tanks to look realistic, and your's is perfect. I'm jealous.

I've been looking around a few of the pet srores that sell fish. I'm surprised that I haven't seen any shale for sale, that was always a big thing, for making little lean toos for the cat fish, and other bottem feeders to hide in.

Thank You, for taking the time to reply to my post. I hope we can become friends and maybe pick your brain again in the future.

Carl
Carl
You're welcome. And you'll find many members here who will readily share their experiences and knowledge. Just ask.

One suggestion on the catfish shelters; bogwood is best for this. Most substrate fish like some hiding spots, and the |Malaysian Driftwood that is for sale in many fish stores is ideal. It is natural so each piece is different, but much of it contains crevices, tunnels, and shapes that suit this purpose admirably, while being very natural. You can't see much of it for the thick plants, but in that tank in my last post there are 7 chunks, and rather sizeable chunks, of bogwood; my 30+ corys are in heaven. And wood in an angelfish tank is always good, the more the better.

Here's a short video of some altum angels in their natural Amazonian habitat that will illustrate.

Byron.

Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2012, 06:37 PM   #6
 
Okay, I'll ask what's bogwood?

LOL you said you have 30 plus corys all in the same tank. You must really loved them.

I'll tell you a funny little story about I got started with tropical fish.

My brother in-law brought a pretty little Jack Dem, for his community tank. Well Jack eat everyone of Butchies fish.

Butchie got so pissed off, he put Jack in a dish pan, and hs was going to flush him down the toilet bowl.

But I came along and felt sorry for jack. I though Jack was a pretty little fish too.

Butchie gave me Jack and told me where to shove him. But then he gave me a little five gallon tank to put Jack in.

So I was thrilled to have a fish and tank, so I went out and brough a big cory, to help keep Jacks tank nice clean. But jack went nuts trying to catch the cory, and chased it around and around the little tank trying eat him.

So Jack went back in the dish pan!

My wife's and I didn't know what to do .

But her cousin had an old 15 gallon tank, that he wanted to get rit of. So I brough it from him, to put the cory in, then I put Jack back iin the five gallon tank all by himself, and that's where he stayed until he died about five years later.

I guess I really got bitten by the fish bug, because the next thing I knew I had, a 5 gallon, a 15 gallon, a 20 long, a 29 gallon, and 2 ten gallon tanks, all going at the same time. what can I say? Sometimes I get a little carried away.

Anyway that's how I started with this hobby.

How did you happen to get into it?

Carl
bigcarl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2012, 06:55 PM   #7
 
Thanks Boredomb, for taking the time to comment on my post, and sending me your advise. I've also read about some liquid fertilizers and tablets that you skick into the gravel under the plants. Now that sounds like someting even I can do. I like things nice simple. I'm going to read those articals now.

Thank You Again for taking the time to write me and give me your advise.
Carl
bigcarl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2012, 07:27 PM   #8
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Bogwood is wood chunks or branches that we use in fish tanks. It can be collected outdoors provided you know what you're collecting and deal with preparation. I prefer buying mine in a fish store. Many stores carry Malaysian Driftwood which is what I have in all my tanks. It is heavy so it sinks immediately, and I've never had issues with fungus from this type.

I like corys; I've had more previously, back in the 1990's I had over 50 species in my 115g and 90g tanks. All of them now are in the 115g, just over 30 representing 10 species.

I had a fish tank when I was young (not much of a success sad to say) and after i got settled and working in the 1980's I got into the hobby big-time. I moved and for a few years couldn't have tanks, then in the 1990's I got back into it, even bigger time I guess. I now have a fish room with 7 tanks ranging from the 115g down to a 10g, all planted and full of fish.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2012, 10:34 AM   #9
 
WOW Byron, that's awesome. I haven't noticed the bogwood in the fish store yet. But I wasn't looking for it. I like drift wood, and that's what I have been looking for. The kid that I was talking to said I had to boil the drift wood now! I used to have to soak it first, to get it water logged, so it would stay down, but I can boil it.

I've seen pictures of the Malaysain driftwood, pretty stuff, I know it would look good in a tank with some plants around it.

But that's the stuff that felt so dustyand gritty in my hands that I put it back down.

Do you have to boil the Malaysain drift wood first too,and do you have any short cuts for rinsing gravel?That used to take forever

It was good to hear from you again.
Carl
bigcarl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2012, 01:03 PM   #10
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigcarl View Post
WOW Byron, that's awesome. I haven't noticed the bogwood in the fish store yet. But I wasn't looking for it. I like drift wood, and that's what I have been looking for. The kid that I was talking to said I had to boil the drift wood now! I used to have to soak it first, to get it water logged, so it would stay down, but I can boil it.

I've seen pictures of the Malaysain driftwood, pretty stuff, I know it would look good in a tank with some plants around it.

But that's the stuff that felt so dustyand gritty in my hands that I put it back down.

Do you have to boil the Malaysain drift wood first too,and do you have any short cuts for rinsing gravel?That used to take forever

It was good to hear from you again.
Carl
One of the advantages of the Malaysian Driftwood is that it is heavy and sinks immediately. It is very natural, and every piece is different because it is real wood. I usually just wash it off. If the initial leeching of tannins bothers you (it will discolour the water but there is no harmful effect to fish) you can boil it first to release most of the tannins. Some will still leech out slowly over months, but I don't really notice these, except if I do a major water change as when I am really pruning plants in a tank. Then the influx of more water makes it obvious because it is just a tad more white. But this is not an issue.

Some woods sold in stores can be problematic for fungus. Grapewood and Mopani wood fall into this category. I never use them, learned from experience what can happen from some fungi. Dead fish. Not worth the risk.

Having all the same type of wood also creates a uniform, and more natural scene. Just as using the same type of rock in tanks with rockwork.

Gravel and sand I rinse in small quantities in a pail in the laundry room sink until the water is somewhat clear. I am now using playsand in my tanks, 4 of them so far. This takes forever, but the end result is worth it.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Stocking my 105-gallon display tank and 20 gallon sump fishr4life Saltwater Fish 2 01-27-2008 03:51 PM
Happy Fathers Day FaIIanAnJell Off Topic Discussions 1 06-17-2007 07:31 AM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:12 PM.