how much salt is ok for my fish
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how much salt is ok for my fish

This is a discussion on how much salt is ok for my fish within the Freshwater and Tropical Fish forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> ok so now i have a 300litre tank with 2 bala's 3 clown loach 3 golden weather loach (golden dojo loach) 4 glass cats ...

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how much salt is ok for my fish
Old 01-23-2013, 09:37 AM   #1
 
how much salt is ok for my fish

ok so now i have a 300litre tank

with 2 bala's
3 clown loach
3 golden weather loach (golden dojo loach)
4 glass cats
30+ mollies
1 plec

how much salt can i add for the molly's
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Old 01-23-2013, 10:11 AM   #2
 
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You have a bit of a mix in your community there, some of them prefer hard water, some like it soft. . . Loaches are scale-less, and don't like salt in the water at all. They'll tolerate it in low doses for short periods of time (as in battling ich) but I wouldn't recommend adding salt to this tank on a permanent basis - your best bet here would be to move/rehome some of these fish into another tank, so that you can keep the proper parameters for them all.

Mollies need hard water to thrive, and salt can help there - they will do well in every type of water from fresh to brackish, and can be adapted to full-salt - but as long as the water is hard, they don't *need* salt to do well. :)
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Old 01-23-2013, 11:03 AM   #3
 
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Originally Posted by Chesherca View Post
You have a bit of a mix in your community there, some of them prefer hard water, some like it soft. . . Loaches are scale-less, and don't like salt in the water at all. They'll tolerate it in low doses for short periods of time (as in battling ich) but I wouldn't recommend adding salt to this tank on a permanent basis - your best bet here would be to move/rehome some of these fish into another tank, so that you can keep the proper parameters for them all.

Mollies need hard water to thrive, and salt can help there - they will do well in every type of water from fresh to brackish, and can be adapted to full-salt - but as long as the water is hard, they don't *need* salt to do well. :)
it is for my males as my females live in another tank with my krib which is ok with reasonably brackish water

all i want is for there to be a minimal amount of salt in my main tank so there is less salinity difference between the two tank as i do not want to over stress my prize molly who is 3.5" and a 2nd generation streghtened breed

only my bigggest also strongest molly male will meet the females then once my current juvies grow i will empty main tank of the molly males and only keep the 2 biggest and so on untill the 5th generation are mega sized mollys my dad did this years ago and had one at 5.5" in length 5.9 being the maximum reported i want to recreate these sizes and health over time
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Old 01-23-2013, 12:59 PM   #4
 
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Ahhh, okay. . .
I understand that you don't want to stress your fish - especially if your star Molly (or his mates/fry) will be moving back and forth from tank to tank. . .you're correct in that moving the male into the salinated tank from fresh without any acclimatization WILL cause him unnecessary stress. The good news is that, as long as your water is on the hard side (high Gh and Kh), there is no real NEED to add salt. Mollies are fine in hard, fresh water. Personally, I would remove the salt (slowly) from the female's tank, because if I'm reading you correctly - your male is in community with loaches. Even a low dose of salt won't sit well with them, especially not over a long period of time - so I wouldn't recommend it while the other salt intolerant species are in that tank - it simply would not be fair to them. I'm sorry I can't give you a better answer than that . . . I think you've got a really good excuse to get another tank! :)

Last edited by Chesh; 01-23-2013 at 01:01 PM..
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Old 01-23-2013, 01:27 PM   #5
 
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Ahhh, okay. . .
I understand that you don't want to stress your fish - especially if your star Molly (or his mates/fry) will be moving back and forth from tank to tank. . .you're correct in that moving the male into the salinated tank from fresh without any acclimatization WILL cause him unnecessary stress. The good news is that, as long as your water is on the hard side (high Gh and Kh), there is no real NEED to add salt. Mollies are fine in hard, fresh water. Personally, I would remove the salt (slowly) from the female's tank, because if I'm reading you correctly - your male is in community with loaches. Even a low dose of salt won't sit well with them, especially not over a long period of time - so I wouldn't recommend it while the other salt intolerant species are in that tank - it simply would not be fair to them. I'm sorry I can't give you a better answer than that . . . I think you've got a really good excuse to get another tank! :)
i have a spare tank but knowhere for it other than to replace my plastic sump for my main tank as its not working as i designed it to lol

i have had some salt in the tank since i got the clowns, glass cats and weather loach had them all over a year and never even a sign of stress or irritation i was more wondering if there was a set amount in SG so i can mesure a small gap

my water is avrg not soft not hard and because of how they breed in the wild IE. with salt this is how i want the first 9-10 months of the frys life


i may just have to move the male into a kind of middle ground with salinity between the two to aclimate it before adding to the new tank once my fry get moved to the main this is where they will stay

Last edited by madyotto; 01-23-2013 at 01:30 PM..
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Old 01-23-2013, 06:43 PM   #6
 
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I take the view, based upon the scientific evidence, that salt is not good for any freshwater fish. You can read why here:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...quarium-97842/

As Izzy mentioned, the issue with mollies is not salt but hardness which occurs from several mineral salts especially calcium and magnesium. "Salt" in the sense of common salt or even aquarium salt is only sodium, and this is what is not good for any of these fish long-term. And the effects are cumulative, as the article points out.

Marine salt includes other minerals too, so that works better for brackish fish. Mollies do not need brackish water at all, to be healthy, but they also seem to manage in it. But this would have to be on their own, not with other fish particularly soft water fish for which this would be stressful and that means trouble down the road.

Byron.
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Old 01-26-2013, 06:18 AM   #7
 
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
I take the view, based upon the scientific evidence, that salt is not good for any freshwater fish. You can read why here:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...quarium-97842/

As Izzy mentioned, the issue with mollies is not salt but hardness which occurs from several mineral salts especially calcium and magnesium. "Salt" in the sense of common salt or even aquarium salt is only sodium, and this is what is not good for any of these fish long-term. And the effects are cumulative, as the article points out.

Marine salt includes other minerals too, so that works better for brackish fish. Mollies do not need brackish water at all, to be healthy, but they also seem to manage in it. But this would have to be on their own, not with other fish particularly soft water fish for which this would be stressful and that means trouble down the road.

Byron.
ok thanks byron

i have been using a tonic salt wich does have some ammounts of calcium and magnesium in it and i very rearly add salt maybe once a year as i only ever remove about 20 litres to wash my filter in even though there is no need to wash it in tank water i find it good practice as i never actually just change some water so 20 litre every month for fiter washing is no hassle i also leave my filters to soak in tap water after washing every 5-6 months

so the salinity strength will get diluted over time untill i feel it needs topping up

however my breeding tank is a diffrent matter it is very heavily planted and i also change 25% water every week while i have pregnant fish in there my fry also stay in the breeding tank until they are abouts 9 months old

ok guys thanks for your reply i guess i have my answer here i will use the same small amount i always have and then use a small 15litre tank as a mid point so i can aclimate the molly before adding to the near brakish breeding tank

i do understand byron that salt is not needed but i am following the way i was taught to breed mollies by my dad who used to have some of the biggest and healthyest mollies in the uk
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Old 01-26-2013, 01:48 PM   #8
 
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The salinity does not diminish but builds up if no water changes are being done regularly and significant volume.

Molly are fine as I said, but I would not subject soft water fish to any salt, it is detrimental over time. Just so everyone is clear.

Byron.
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Old 01-27-2013, 04:55 AM   #9
 
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The salinity does not diminish but builds up if no water changes are being done regularly and significant volume.

Molly are fine as I said, but I would not subject soft water fish to any salt, it is detrimental over time. Just so everyone is clear.

Byron.
byron

monthy 20 litre water change is fine for this

20 liter 12x's a year is 2400 liters i am aware the ammount will decrease extreamly slowly this is why i do it this way so over time there is an accumilation on the salinity decrease

there is almost 7x's the size of tank being changed in small ammounts and i also add a lil less each time but it is good that you made this clear for everybody else
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