Help Me Stock my 29G - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 06-05-2012, 09:09 PM Thread Starter
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Help Me Stock my 29G

29 gallon tank
- Play sand substrate
- 2 medium sized Amazon Swords, 2 medium sized Wisteria
- pH of 7.4
- 76ºF to 78ºF depending on the weather
- 0 ammonia, nitrites, nitrates
- gH of about 3 degrees

I currently have my substrate fish picked with 4 small Peppered Corys, and a small Bristlenose Pleco.

I'm looking for suggestions of which fish to add. I'd like to have a school or two of smaller fish, and one "centerpiece" fish.

Thank you in advance.
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post #2 of 10 Old 06-05-2012, 09:15 PM
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How about cherry barbs (lower half), black neons (upper half) and an angel fish?

125 - BGK, chanchito cichlid, pictus cats, silver dollars, palmas bichir
125 - cichlids (severums, bolivian rams, chocolate), rainbows ( turquoise, red), loaches (angelicus, zebra, kuhli and horseface), plecos (BN, RL and clown), denison barbs, tiretrack eel, pearl gouramis, betta
90 - Congo tetras, african knife, upside down cats, spotted ctenopoma, kribensis, delhezzi bichir
2.5 - betta
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post #3 of 10 Old 06-05-2012, 11:31 PM
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Hmm, you've got a lot of options with your hardness down that low. If I were in your situation I would stock one large school (10+) of something like glowlight tetra or (assuming your KH is low and your pH will drop) rummynose (Hemigrammus rhodostomus). Cochu or bloodfin tetra would also be interesting. For a centerpiece fish I would go with a gourami like thicklips gourami or a trio of honey gourami. And adding a few more cories would also be a good idea. Those little guys are cutest in larger schools.

Either way with any tetra or gourami you'll want to add some floating plants. These fish look best under a canopy.

I'm actually in a situation very similar to yours. My 29 gal will be stocked with kuhli loaches, a large school of cardinal tetra, and a single thicklips gourami.

---Izzy

Sitting by the koi pond

writings on fish and fishkeeping


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post #4 of 10 Old 06-06-2012, 12:45 PM
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Angelfish should be in a small group, and a 29g is insufficient space for that. Stay with smaller shoaling fish, but as there is not that much swimming room in a 29g I would suggest the quieter rather than more active species. Rasbora, some of the tetra, fall into the quieter category. Danio and barb do not. Check the many species in our profiles.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #5 of 10 Old 06-06-2012, 01:29 PM
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How old is the tank?
I feel sometimes that some are relying on a few plant's to forego the cycling process.
While it is true that with suffcient plant mass that is ,,,or has been thriving, that one can safely add a few fish at a time to newly established tank's and not have cause to worry bout ammonia,nitrites,, It takes a fair amount of plant's to do this. (In my opinion)
It is my view that no more than 15 to 25 percent of the substrate surface should be void of plant's if this is the path chosen.
I feel sometimes ,(not particularly here,) that folks plop two or three plant's in their tank's and assume it's safe to begin stocking to capacity too quickly.
Fast growing,easy low light plant's ,and lot's of them are needed for this to work in majority of newly established tank's.
Substrates,depending on type(composistion), can leach ammonia as organics are broke down and fishes also produce fair amount of ammonia as by-product of respiration.(depending on number's,size)
Add to this,, decomposing fish food,fish waste,,and or decaying plant matter, and you could very well wind up with planted tank full of sick or diseased(ICH) fishes.
Cram the tank with as many plant's as you can, and stock slowly and you are less likely to have issues in newly established aquarium's. IMHO

The most important medication in your fish medicine cabinet is.. Clean water.
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post #6 of 10 Old 06-06-2012, 03:11 PM Thread Starter
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This is a 6 month old tank. It housed a school of Tiger Barbs for about 5 months (they've been moved), and the plants are about 4 months old.

It has been well cycled and my levels have stayed at 0 across the board for the past 4 months.

I've been thinking about Tetras, but in the heat of summer, my tank will hit 78ºF with the heater off, so I'm worried that Neons can't handle the higher temp for extended periods.
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post #7 of 10 Old 06-06-2012, 03:15 PM
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My neons do fine - their unheated tank is at least 80 for the summer.

125 - BGK, chanchito cichlid, pictus cats, silver dollars, palmas bichir
125 - cichlids (severums, bolivian rams, chocolate), rainbows ( turquoise, red), loaches (angelicus, zebra, kuhli and horseface), plecos (BN, RL and clown), denison barbs, tiretrack eel, pearl gouramis, betta
90 - Congo tetras, african knife, upside down cats, spotted ctenopoma, kribensis, delhezzi bichir
2.5 - betta
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post #8 of 10 Old 06-06-2012, 04:24 PM
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Agree, for temporary warm spells most fish will manage. Just noticed something else, the pH at 7.4, with a GH of 3 dGH I would expect the KH to be low too, so the pH should lower, and below 7 would be ideal for what you are planning. Among the characins are the pencilfish, which are not active except Nannostomus beckfordi so avoid that species; the others would be nice, several are in the profiles.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #9 of 10 Old 06-06-2012, 04:44 PM Thread Starter
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The water out of my tap tests at a pH of 7.8-8 after sitting overnight.

I can either do 25% weekly water changes and have a pH of 7.4 as I do now, or I can go two or three weeks between my water changes, and the pH gets into the 6.8-7.0 range.

I have Mopani in the tank, it leaks tannins pretty quickly, but it's not enough to drop the pH into the sub 7.0 range unless I spread my water changes out.

I've decided that water changes are probably more important than pH to help maintain oxygen levels, but if spreading out my water changes won't adversely affect my fish, I'm not opposed to doing it if it's necessary to maintain a proper pH.

Our tap water here is weird. it ranges from 8.0-8.6 pH depending on the area, yet ranges from soft to moderately soft. It makes optimizing the water for fish tough. I have no desire to chemically alter my parameters, I prefer to only use natural methods, as they're less temperamental.
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post #10 of 10 Old 06-06-2012, 05:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wattser93 View Post
The water out of my tap tests at a pH of 7.8-8 after sitting overnight.

I can either do 25% weekly water changes and have a pH of 7.4 as I do now, or I can go two or three weeks between my water changes, and the pH gets into the 6.8-7.0 range.

I have Mopani in the tank, it leaks tannins pretty quickly, but it's not enough to drop the pH into the sub 7.0 range unless I spread my water changes out.

I've decided that water changes are probably more important than pH to help maintain oxygen levels, but if spreading out my water changes won't adversely affect my fish, I'm not opposed to doing it if it's necessary to maintain a proper pH.

Our tap water here is weird. it ranges from 8.0-8.6 pH depending on the area, yet ranges from soft to moderately soft. It makes optimizing the water for fish tough. I have no desire to chemically alter my parameters, I prefer to only use natural methods, as they're less temperamental.
How I would approach this is to adjust the pH in one go by mixing in rainwater or pure water, then subsequent water changes should not matter much. It would help to know the KH though, as this might be a factor.

What is lowering it now is not so much the wood, as the natural biological processes. As organics in the substrate are broken down by bacteria, the process releases CO2 which forms carbonic acid in the water and lowers the pH. The KH buffers this, depending upon how high it is. My tanks can lower from a tap water pH of 7.2 down to 6 within a few weeks, even with weekly water changes of half the tank, but I have zero KH so it is faster. Once this happens, the ph stays at 6 (or some tanks 5) because the biology is stable.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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