is this a good stock?
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Freshwater and Tropical Fish » is this a good stock?

is this a good stock?

This is a discussion on is this a good stock? within the Freshwater and Tropical Fish forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> 29 gallon tank- 2-angelfish 6-lemon tetras 6-corys 1-albino bristlenose pleco 2-aquaclear 50s, moderately planted, 50% water changes weekly. if i had to remove something ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Leopard Cory
Leopard Cory
Scissortail Rasbora
Scissortail Rasbora
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
is this a good stock?
Old 08-19-2012, 12:10 AM   #1
 
allaboutfish's Avatar
 
is this a good stock?

29 gallon tank-
2-angelfish
6-lemon tetras
6-corys
1-albino bristlenose pleco
2-aquaclear 50s, moderately planted, 50% water changes weekly. if i had to remove something then itd be the lemon tetras, and i do not care if the angels eggs get eatin.
allaboutfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2012, 04:07 AM   #2
 
sidluckman's Avatar
 
Compared to most, this stocking plan shows restraint and thought, especially with regard to compatibility in water preferences and biotope. A couple years ago I would have really liked it. I would like it better if you moved all of that to a 55-60-75 gallon and bumped the number of cories and lemon tetras up to about ten each. Or if, in the current tank, the angels were replaced with a pair of Rams, possibly or Keyhole Cichlids.

Increasingly, I am hesitant to advocate strongly that any schooling fish belong in a tank much smaller than a 55 or at least 40-long because of their swimming style and requirement that more individuals are better than fewer.

I no longer think of neons, for example, as small fish; I think of them as a very large organism living in groups, usually, of thousands of individual bodies. While, in the past, I might have said it was fine to put a half dozen neons in a ten or fifteen gallon tank, I vow never to do so again. Same with cory cats.

Speaking of which, please select your substrate carefully for these guys (smooth sand, maybe), provide driftwood for the ancistrus and above all, target feed the catfish and focus on them when you feed. Trust me, the tetras and angels will push their way in, but I have seen way too much mysterious attrition among corys, mostly (I believe) because they are not fed properly.

Most of us sprinkle a few flakes on top and walk away, never realizing that not much makes its way down where it can sustain a school of active little fish. Squirt some mysis or bloodworms down there with a feeding syringe, flake food or even pre-soaked small pelleted food.

Remember, these are just my opinions. I have become more desirous to see schooling fish given the full treatment in larger groups and in larger tanks as I have matured. I feel we too often use them incorrectly because they are, individually, tiny, so they get stuck in schools of three (what is THAT about? a school of three? that's a jazz combo, not a school!!) in a ten gallon tank, when there should probably be upward of 75 of them rambling around in a 125. You know what I mean?

Last edited by sidluckman; 08-19-2012 at 04:13 AM.. Reason: spelling and clarity
sidluckman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2012, 09:07 AM   #3
 
allaboutfish's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sidluckman View Post
Compared to most, this stocking plan shows restraint and thought, especially with regard to compatibility in water preferences and biotope. A couple years ago I would have really liked it. I would like it better if you moved all of that to a 55-60-75 gallon and bumped the number of cories and lemon tetras up to about ten each. Or if, in the current tank, the angels were replaced with a pair of Rams, possibly or Keyhole Cichlids.

Increasingly, I am hesitant to advocate strongly that any schooling fish belong in a tank much smaller than a 55 or at least 40-long because of their swimming style and requirement that more individuals are better than fewer.

I no longer think of neons, for example, as small fish; I think of them as a very large organism living in groups, usually, of thousands of individual bodies. While, in the past, I might have said it was fine to put a half dozen neons in a ten or fifteen gallon tank, I vow never to do so again. Same with cory cats.

Speaking of which, please select your substrate carefully for these guys (smooth sand, maybe), provide driftwood for the ancistrus and above all, target feed the catfish and focus on them when you feed. Trust me, the tetras and angels will push their way in, but I have seen way too much mysterious attrition among corys, mostly (I believe) because they are not fed properly.

Most of us sprinkle a few flakes on top and walk away, never realizing that not much makes its way down where it can sustain a school of active little fish. Squirt some mysis or bloodworms down there with a feeding syringe, flake food or even pre-soaked small pelleted food.

Remember, these are just my opinions. I have become more desirous to see schooling fish given the full treatment in larger groups and in larger tanks as I have matured. I feel we too often use them incorrectly because they are, individually, tiny, so they get stuck in schools of three (what is THAT about? a school of three? that's a jazz combo, not a school!!) in a ten gallon tank, when there should probably be upward of 75 of them rambling around in a 125. You know what I mean?
yea i never do schools of less than 6 and if i can fit more i do. so are you agreeing with the stock or saying i should remove something? i feed my bottom dwellers shrimp pellets and algae wafers.
allaboutfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2012, 09:41 AM   #4
 
sidluckman's Avatar
 
Yes, my preference would be to leave the Angels out. It's knowing that they are are going to be 6-7 inches long and 8-9 inches high that makes me say this. If this is the same 29 gal I have, it's only 18" high, right?
It is something of an assumption that the angels you put in will be a pair, and if not, that they will get along as they get older, more territorial, more rife with hormonal moodiness. I believe a group of 6-8 angels is a safer bet, even after some of them pair up, but you would definitely be talking about a 75-90 gallon tank in such a case.

I'm not keen on the angel idea, but I would be a hypocrite if I told you I had not attempted and even spawned them in smaller tanks than this. However, my most successful experiences with them were in 55 gallon and up, with two or more pairs.

You will probably hear from people who will disagree with me. I am fielding questions on this and other forums where the issues come back to overly optimistic stocking, so I have become somewhat conservative on the issue of space.

I have a 29 gallon tank at work, with 12 rasboras, 2 loaches, 1 Flying fox, and a trio of Rainbows that are living out their "twilight years" as the last survivors of a 125 gal rainbow tank I kept several years ago. As I watch the rasboras, I believe their swimming behavior would be more organized and "pretty" in a bigger tank. The Loaches, because of their swimming style (serpentine and erratic) seem most at home. The Flying Fox and Rainbows definitely look like they'd appreciate a longer tank. For what it's worth, I keep my own swordtails in a 55, and when people aske me about barbs, rasboras, danios, and most tetras I say "go with a 40 long or 55. A 48" tank is so much better." I have never tried to keep barbs, even relatively small ones like checker or ruby barbs, in tanks shorter than 48".

I believe that some of the high-bodied tetras are okay in a 29, because they are not the non-stop swimmers that longer, more streamlined tetras are. So I think the lemons would be okay. Really the better choice over the angels, which, as we know is not what you want to hear. . .

As I said, my opinion.

In any case, it will be a beautiful tank which ever way you go, so I will enjoy seeing it. . .
sidluckman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2012, 09:54 AM   #5
 
Olympia's Avatar
 
I have to second the angel fish thoughts. There is simply not enough room for even a pair. Maybe a pair of rams. Have you thought about hatchet fish? They're pretty sedate. I'd probably increase those schools a little bit more.
Olympia is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2012, 10:11 AM   #6
 
allaboutfish's Avatar
 
the angels are a definent. theyre already in the tank. see i bought some angels and was sent a lot more than i bought as extras and i didnt read the size of the wild crosses so theyre way bigger than my other angels so theyre in a 29 and now im splitting up my dimes and quarters into 2 different 55 gallons.
allaboutfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2012, 10:14 AM   #7
 
Olympia's Avatar
 
Are they a mated pair? If they are I'm not sure what you could have in such a small space with them, minus perhaps the bristlenose.
Olympia is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2012, 10:22 AM   #8
 
allaboutfish's Avatar
 
i think they are. i havent seen any breeding behavior though so they could just be two angels that get along. ive heard corys were good tankmates since the have the spines to defend themselves and they stay at the bottom. im planning to have a big amazon sword in there and already have a variety of river rocks and other plants.
allaboutfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2012, 11:01 AM   #9
 
sidluckman's Avatar
 
I think it's so funny when people have already done something but couch it in the future tense:

" Yeah, uh, hypothetically speaking, would it be okay to pop a couple angels in a 29 gallon with some tetras. Just, ya know, hypothetically, I mean?"

And then no one agrees that it's a great idea. In this case, I think we agree it is an imperfect but possible plan, at least in the short term.

Anyway, you made me chuckle-- because we have all done that! "Are you sure I can't keep a tigershark in a twenty gallon tank?? OMG, I already bought the shark!!!"

There's another thread or two in which the poster complains of angels biting her lemon tetras. Other forum contributors including Byron suggested that this was indeed a possibility. I have never had Angels injure other fish, except a small school of white clouds that got unceremoniously eaten. When I kept Angels with a small school of Bleeding Hearts I had the opposite experience in which the Tetras relentlessly nipped at the filaments of the Angels' dorsal and anal fins. And in another tank years ago, that same combination worked out fine. So there you go. I was one for two. How they will interact with lemon tetras is anyone's guess.

Yes, I think the corys will be largely ignored by the angels. I would be surprised if any or many fish pester or eat cory cats. I would imagine it would be like trying to eat rose thorns. I second the idea of keeping a larger group of them and remember to feed feed feed them!

Poor guy! It's been a rough day for you on the threads, huh?
sidluckman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2012, 11:06 AM   #10
 
jaysee's Avatar
 
Yeah, if I were you I would be hoping that they are NOT a mated pair.
jaysee is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help me stock! Myrtaceae Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 12 01-26-2012 10:54 AM
Does this sound like good stock for a 20 gallon? Titan416 Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 5 03-03-2008 07:26 PM
when can i re-stock? miagrrl Freshwater and Tropical Fish 3 09-25-2007 10:02 PM
Is it ok to stock up? killjoy391 Beginner Saltwater Aquariums 3 08-09-2007 10:54 PM
good stock or no? t.ropical m.ist Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 5 12-31-2006 07:15 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:14 AM.