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This is a discussion on Good or Bad? within the Freshwater and Tropical Fish forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by musho3210 Originally Posted by tophat665 ...Small Corydoras (C. Pygmaeus, Hasorus, hastatus, panda) - 5 - 10... The above is the amount ...

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Old 03-11-2007, 04:48 PM   #21
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musho3210
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Originally Posted by tophat665
...Small Corydoras (C. Pygmaeus, Hasorus, hastatus, panda) - 5 - 10...

The above is the amount if that is all that is in your tank....
5-10 cories is too much for a 10 gallon, unless its a species tank 3-5
That's why the species I listed. C. Pygmaeus, hasborus, and hastatus stay 1" to a shade over, and C. panda tops out at 2". The first three can be kept in the same sort of densities as the smaller tetras. Pandas need a bit more room. Surely, though, 5 (pandas) -10 (pygmaeus, hasbrosus, or hastatus) in a 10 gallon is well within the carrying capacity. These are not the same things as C. aeneus, or Brochis Splendens, which get around 3" and should not be kept as more than a pair in a 10 gallon (if at all. And please forebear to remind me that cories prefer shoals; there is disagreement on that point, though I prefer them in shoals myself.) To top that off, the fist three listed cories are less wedded to the bottom of the tank than most, and are frequently found schooling in midwater under the proper conditions, so issues of tank floor space are less germane for these than larger species.

Let me round this out a little more. There are at least 5 dwarf species of corydoras. Corydoras pygmeaus (Pygmy Cory), C. hastatus (Dwarf Cory), and C. hasbrosus (note: misspelled in orignal post) are fairly commpnly found in better fish stores. C. cochui and C. guapore are also in this group, but much, much rarer.

All of these are tiny, maximum length from 1 to 1.6" (2.5-3cm). All prefer to be in a larger school than larger cories (6 minimum, 10 better, 50 or 100 or more better still; there's no argument that these are schooling fish). All spend more time in midwater and like to rest on leaves of aquarium plants (they really prefer a densely planted tank - I sometimes see my Pygmy Cories resting halfway up the cabomba thicket in their tank). They are entirely peaceful, and should be kept only with other small, peaceful fish (msmall carachins like neons are ideal). Scotcat.com says that 10 gallons is ideal for a shoal of 8 C. hastatus (or 6 C. panda), and mentions breeding C. hasbrusus in a 5.5 gallon. They require small foods (brine shrimp, powdered flake, tubifex). They have a relatively wide range of water tolerance: pH 6-8, temp 72-80, and GH 5-19.

Panda cories are a little bigger, a more inclined to the bottom, and less needy of large schools (though 6 is still a good minimum number)

Finally, these little fellows are occasionally stocked in award winning planted tanks of as little as 1 gallon.
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Old 03-11-2007, 06:58 PM   #22
 
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Panda cories are a little bigger, a more inclined to the bottom
Regardless of what cory, I would like to add that those fish need a sandy bottom. :)
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Old 03-11-2007, 07:02 PM   #23
 
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Panda cories are a little bigger, a more inclined to the bottom
Regardless of what cory, I would like to add that those fish need a sandy bottom. :)
actually they dont need a sandy bottom, they love sand but all they need is gravel that doesnt have sharp edges so they wont damage there barbels.
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Old 03-11-2007, 08:52 PM   #24
 
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Hear hear! Sandy is best, but rounded gravel will work just fine. I've got one tank that has coarse sand at the front and rounded river pebbles over the rest of the tank, with a nice cave that opens onto both, and I never see my cories anywhere but on the pebbles. (4 Sterbas and a 3-line - not apprpriate for 10 gallons.)
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Old 03-11-2007, 09:30 PM   #25
 
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Well, it seems that I have quite a few choices. By the way, are all the fish mentioned above for fresh water? Because I noticed that I could have 1 dwarf puffer fish, I thought that they were salt water?

Thanks
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Old 03-11-2007, 09:32 PM   #26
 
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Well, it seems that I have quite a few choices. By the way, are all the fish mentioned above for fresh water? Because I noticed that I could have 1 dwarf puffer fish, I thought that they were salt water?

Thanks
A common misconception, dwarf puffers are 100% freshwater, petsmart says they require aquarium salt which is actually very wrong. Also dwarf puffers, despite there size, are agressive fish and love nipping fins.
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Old 03-11-2007, 09:37 PM   #27
 
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Well, it seems that I have quite a few choices. By the way, are all the fish mentioned above for fresh water? Because I noticed that I could have 1 dwarf puffer fish, I thought that they were salt water?

Thanks
A common misconception, dwarf puffers are 100% freshwater, petsmart says they require aquarium salt which is actually very wrong. Also dwarf puffers, despite there size, are agressive fish and love nipping fins.
Oh, ok thanks, so dwarf puffers are for fresh water and can be held in a 10 gallon tank (1 dwarf puffer) and just regular puffer fish are for salt water...

As for the biting, what other fish could go with a dwarf puffer? And how many?

I once had my betta in the 10 gallon tank and had to move him because he liked to bite gold fish fins. :(

Thanks
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Old 03-11-2007, 09:42 PM   #28
 
well very rarely can you have a dwarf puffer share a tank with another fish. Otos work sometimes if you provide adequate plants to hide in. They do best in a species only tank.
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Old 03-12-2007, 01:01 PM   #29
 
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well very rarely can you have a dwarf puffer share a tank with another fish. Otos work sometimes if you provide adequate plants to hide in. They do best in a species only tank.
Ok thank you, could you please explain what a speicies tank is? And ive noticed bubbles at the surface of my tank right now, I know you get a lot when you add new water, but why so many right now?

Thanks
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Old 03-12-2007, 04:54 PM   #30
 
a species tank is simply a tank with only one species of fish in there. A tank filled with only fancy guppies is a species tank, a tank filled with only dwarf puffer is a species tank. I dont know about the bubbles though....
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