Cories and Otos dying.
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Freshwater and Tropical Fish » Cories and Otos dying.

Cories and Otos dying.

This is a discussion on Cories and Otos dying. within the Freshwater and Tropical Fish forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> I have a 55 gallon community tank with gravel substrate. In the past couple of weeks almost all of my otos and cories have ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Dwarf Puffer
Dwarf Puffer
Zebra Danio
Zebra Danio
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Cories and Otos dying.
Old 04-07-2014, 08:52 AM   #1
 
OrangeAugust's Avatar
 
Cories and Otos dying.

I have a 55 gallon community tank with gravel substrate. In the past couple of weeks almost all of my otos and cories have died. The water params are normal and all of my other fish are fine. At first I was wondering if it had something to do with the substrate. The cories are always down there... but the otos aren't. The otos are usually on the glass or plants... I realized yesterday that I've never done a good gravel cleaning since I set up the tank about 5 months ago. I do water changes with my small siphon, but it doesn't reach the bottom. So I bought a gravel vac this weekend that is supposed to be for tanks of my size and I did a good cleaning- poking the vacuum into the gravel (so much gross stuff got sucked up!)
Could that be the reason? Were my cories getting poisoned by stuff that was building up under the gravel? That doesn't quite explain the deaths of the otos, though, or does it? I know they are supposedly very sensitive fish.
Thanks in advance!
OrangeAugust is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2014, 09:22 AM   #2
 
lilnaugrim's Avatar
 
That is possible. Ammonia sinks so if you never quite reach the bottom of the tank it is possible that it has poisoned them. That would account for the Otos as well since they are pretty sensitive depending on where they came from and who they came from basically. I've had otos die for no reason simply from stress since they are all wild caught and then the three that I have right now are like little trains that could! They spent a good amount of time at my LFS because they were on a top tank so no one saw them, so I snatched them up and these little guys have gone through thick and thin with me without a die off yet while others just kind of died after a while *shrug*

Also, is it possible that there has been a change in your tap water chemistry? I know larger die offs generally hint to something wrong with water chemistry or something drastic changed quickly. I know with spring often melting ice can have an adverse effect to our tap waters since all the drainage has led to pollutants in the water system which can of course have bad effects on our fish that we don't catch until its too late. In which case I often advise to change to half spring water or all spring water but that's a little difficult in a tank of 55 gallons lol.

I have a feeling though that it's most likely the ammonia all at the bottom of the tank that killed them off. Also, don't siphon the entire substrate all at once, too much exposure to ammonia and nasty junk from the bottom can really take a toll on your fish. So I generally do like 1/4 of the gravel on larger tanks for each cleaning. So just deep clean only 1/4 to 1/3 of the gravel in your tank and then just siphon over top of the rest of the gravel to pick up debris on top. Then next water change move to the next section and keep rotating the sections of the tank so they aren't exposed to too much nasty stuff all at once. Just tips for the future!
lilnaugrim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2014, 10:29 AM   #3
 
I would also have to agree with the poisoning. Ammonia was probably so built up under the gravel that the first time you used your vac you hit an ammonia pocket and killed the fish. That's why I personally use pool filter sand in my tanks.
Posted via Mobile Device
AquaJay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2014, 10:38 AM   #4
 
lilnaugrim's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AquaJay View Post
I would also have to agree with the poisoning. Ammonia was probably so built up under the gravel that the first time you used your vac you hit an ammonia pocket and killed the fish. That's why I personally use pool filter sand in my tanks.
Posted via Mobile Device
Sand can still trap ammonia and other nasty stuff under it. Dissolved organic compounds and other non-dissolved things can get pushed under it especially if you have cories or other fish that will kick up the sand. Gravel at least you can siphon all the way to the bottom and you don't have to re-do. Sand tanks it's a good idea to re-do them around a years time depending on your situation of course, sometimes you can wait longer while others it needs to changed sooner.

I'm not advocating for one or the other, just simply stating that each have their ups and downs is all. Ammonia can get trapped anywhere, it's just always a good idea to not expose them to it so much at one time.

Also I believe the OP stated the fish died before the water changes, still, ammonia and other compounds are most likely the reason for the deaths.
lilnaugrim is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Good SA alternative to cories? Or suggestions for cories getting injured.. jennesque Freshwater and Tropical Fish 9 05-07-2013 03:01 PM
can zebra otos mate with regular otos? David007c Catfish 4 03-01-2012 03:18 PM
Cories Keep Dying!!!! stephenmontero Tropical Fish Diseases 11 05-01-2008 03:49 PM


Tags
cory catfish, oto catfish, otocinclus

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:03 AM.