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Can I add 9 fish at once?

This is a discussion on Can I add 9 fish at once? within the Freshwater and Tropical Fish forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by Jbrofish8 I have 20 fish in my 29g and all is just fine. And I plan on adding 3 more soon. ...

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Can I add 9 fish at once?
Old 10-16-2011, 08:26 PM   #11
 
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Originally Posted by Jbrofish8 View Post
I have 20 fish in my 29g and all is just fine. And I plan on adding 3 more soon.

I change my water once a week and my ammonia and nitrite never move above 0.
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Best of luck.
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Old 10-16-2011, 08:31 PM   #12
 
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Oh thanks.

My first tank has about 25 fish and its a 29g as well! I've lost 1 fish since its been set up. And that fish died within the first 10 hours so I'm guessing it was sick or weak coming in.

My point is.. there is no clear cut number for every tank. It depends on the aquarium as well as the bioload of the fish you have.

You can check my tanks in my profile on the left. Every one of my fish is well taken care of and thriving.
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Old 10-16-2011, 10:18 PM   #13
 
Thank Jbro, good to hear someone else with more than 14 fish in a 29g. My corys are always on the bottom, and the black skirts in the middle/top part of the tank. they never get in each others ways and everything is perfect in the tank. The tank has been running for almost 2 months now, and the levels are all 0. I feel like about 15 fish is perfect for my 29g
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Old 10-16-2011, 11:05 PM   #14
 
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Just wanted to post and say that I personally have a 28 gallon tank which had 23 fish in it.. I recently rescaped my tank and I've been having problems with two fish dying because of that, but when I restock I will again have 2 blue rams, either 7 neon tetras or 9 rummynosed tetras, then either 7 or 9 harlequin rasboras - depending on if I have rummys or tetras, as well as 5 corys. Most of those fish have such a small bioload the tank will not be overstocked. When I did have the full 23 fish my tank had zero ammonia and zero nitrite and there was not constant fish waste at the bottom of my tank.
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Old 10-16-2011, 11:26 PM   #15
 
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Just wanted to post and say that I personally have a 28 gallon tank which had 23 fish in it.. I recently rescaped my tank and I've been having problems with two fish dying because of that, but when I restock I will again have 2 blue rams, either 7 neon tetras or 9 rummynosed tetras, then either 7 or 9 harlequin rasboras - depending on if I have rummys or tetras, as well as 5 corys. Most of those fish have such a small bioload the tank will not be overstocked. When I did have the full 23 fish my tank had zero ammonia and zero nitrite and there was not constant fish waste at the bottom of my tank.
Thank you for the post. Just another example. :)
I guess when I am able to, I will add a few Rummynoses and see how it goes. I might get 7 now after hearing all these stories. Then I will have:

6 Black Skirts
5 Corys
7 Rummy Noses

thats 18 fish total.
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Old 10-17-2011, 12:03 AM   #16
 
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Oh, I meant to say, Byron (and others) say that rummys are one of the tetras that need at minimum 9 in a group to be happy. Most other tetras though you'll be fine with just 6-7..

But yes, you're welcome. :) If you've got small, 'clean' enough fish you can absolutely have that many fish in an appropriately sized tank! You can easily keep 10 appropriate fish in a 20gal tank, you could even keep 5 of the appropriate fish in a 5gal! Just make sure they're tiny enough -- and not goldfish or oscars lol



Also, as a reference when stocking, I always check aqadvisor.com. They try their best to take fish bioload into consideration when calculating how stocked your tank is. It'll also tell you preferred ph and temp for each species, and give you alerts on any incompatibility issues, including temperament.

Here, I did a 29 gal tank with 9 rummys, 6 black skirts, and 5 peppered corys and it's showing you at 92% stocking level.

http://aqadvisor.com/AqAdvisor.php?A...rchMode=simple

Last edited by jennesque; 10-17-2011 at 12:07 AM..
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Old 10-17-2011, 11:58 AM   #17
 
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Yes, I would definitely go with 9 minimum for rummys. And that will be fine in your 29g.

A general observation on fish stocking. As someone said, the "inch of fish per gallon" is not reliable. Many (especially beginning) aquarists want "rules" for this and that, but in this hobby such rules are sometimes impossible to formulate. This hobby deals with living creatures, and each aquarium is different from the next. Even among my 7 running tanks, I have different biological actions occurring in each that makes it unique.

The number of fish that any given aquarium will safely and comfortably hold depends upon several factors. The tank volume obviously; whether or not live plants are included; filtration; environmental decor (wood, rock, decor); specific fish species, both from its size but also its needs in terms of space, environmental decor, filtration/water movement. All of these factors interact.

Within reasonable limits, you can have more of some fish compared to fewer of others, even if they might be the same mature size in the same volume of water. The other factors impact.

To the subject case: Nine rummynose tetra will fare much better than will six, all else being equal. The reason is simply because the fish will be less stressed with more, and thus healthier. The immune system is weakened by stress; less stress means a stronger fish. So even if one were to exceed the "limit" of a tank by 2-3 fish, it may actually be a healthier environment than not. At the same time, adding one very small but "trouble" fish can make the same aquarium a death-trap for the fish, solely because a negative element is present.

Hope this makes some sense.

Byron.
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Old 10-17-2011, 04:51 PM   #18
 
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Yes, I would definitely go with 9 minimum for rummys. And that will be fine in your 29g.

A general observation on fish stocking. As someone said, the "inch of fish per gallon" is not reliable. Many (especially beginning) aquarists want "rules" for this and that, but in this hobby such rules are sometimes impossible to formulate. This hobby deals with living creatures, and each aquarium is different from the next. Even among my 7 running tanks, I have different biological actions occurring in each that makes it unique.

The number of fish that any given aquarium will safely and comfortably hold depends upon several factors. The tank volume obviously; whether or not live plants are included; filtration; environmental decor (wood, rock, decor); specific fish species, both from its size but also its needs in terms of space, environmental decor, filtration/water movement. All of these factors interact.

Within reasonable limits, you can have more of some fish compared to fewer of others, even if they might be the same mature size in the same volume of water. The other factors impact.

To the subject case: Nine rummynose tetra will fare much better than will six, all else being equal. The reason is simply because the fish will be less stressed with more, and thus healthier. The immune system is weakened by stress; less stress means a stronger fish. So even if one were to exceed the "limit" of a tank by 2-3 fish, it may actually be a healthier environment than not. At the same time, adding one very small but "trouble" fish can make the same aquarium a death-trap for the fish, solely because a negative element is present.

Hope this makes some sense.

Byron.
That all makes perfect sense. So now on to the final question that will determine what I get at the LFS next week. If I end up wanting to do the 9 Rummy's, should I add them all at once? Or in groups each week? Keep in mind that at the moment I don't have live plants, and don't think I will be getting any anytime soon. I could get floating artificial plants if you really think that would help.
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Old 10-17-2011, 07:03 PM   #19
 
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Originally Posted by JordynMurdock View Post
That all makes perfect sense. So now on to the final question that will determine what I get at the LFS next week. If I end up wanting to do the 9 Rummy's, should I add them all at once? Or in groups each week? Keep in mind that at the moment I don't have live plants, and don't think I will be getting any anytime soon. I could get floating artificial plants if you really think that would help.
Yes, I absolutely do. Floating plants are immensely beneficial both for improving water stability and providing shade. No forest fish like bright light overhead. One can easily see the difference, believe me. Someone in another thread last week or the week before wrote that they took my suggestion for floating plants and were amazed how the tetra suddenly came out and brightened up in colour.

I would get all 9 rummys at once, as I said previously; monitor ammonia and nitrite, be prepared for daily water changes, and preferably use Prime or Ultimate water conditioner as they deal with ammonia and nitrite.
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Old 10-17-2011, 09:41 PM   #20
 
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Yes, I absolutely do. Floating plants are immensely beneficial both for improving water stability and providing shade. No forest fish like bright light overhead. One can easily see the difference, believe me. Someone in another thread last week or the week before wrote that they took my suggestion for floating plants and were amazed how the tetra suddenly came out and brightened up in colour.

I would get all 9 rummys at once, as I said previously; monitor ammonia and nitrite, be prepared for daily water changes, and preferably use Prime or Ultimate water conditioner as they deal with ammonia and nitrite.
Artificial or live floating plants?
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