Angelfish and gourami and pleco! - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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post #11 of 14 Old 09-06-2012, 09:18 AM
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Originally Posted by sidluckman View Post
The leaves can be simply boiled very briefly, then placed in the tank itself. Leaf litter is commonplace in many tropical fish biotopes, especially in the Amazon where the river often floods the forest floor. The leaf surfaces permit growth of a rich layer of infusoria on which smaller fish might graze.
Boiling will remove any nutritive value (hence no infusoria or tannins). A rinse in plain water is sufficient to remove dust, etc. If the collection site is risky (possible contaminants, etc) don't use the leaves.

Placed in the aquarium they will float for a day or two, then sink. I am presently using dry oak leaves to feed my Farlowella vittata fry; when a new leaf goes in the tank they are quick to get on it and start browsing.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #12 of 14 Old 09-06-2012, 09:56 AM
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While nutritive value may be lessened, I hope my cooked broccolli still provides me something. My Mom insisted that it did! I would hate to think these many years later it was all a lie!

Likewise, tannins don't simply disappear as a result of heat. Yes, some tannic acid will be lost, but not neutralized.

My concern is how can we in any way be sure of the safety and source of leaves we put in our aquariums? I merely want the person to exercise caution. I recently purchased Ketapang leaves for my own use, but how do I honestly know that the same type of aerial spraying just used in Texas (in defense against West Nile Virus laden mosqitoes) wasn't used on the imported and rather expensive leaves I just bought? How do I know that drift from agricultural products in California (where our friend "Otter" lives) hasn't been present? I used to work in experimental greenhouses and what troubles me about pesticides is the fact that very often they are mixed with chemicals precisely designed to cause them to adhere to leaf surfaces. Personnally I don't care whether they are rinsed or slightly blanched, but however you clean them, clean them well.


Mr Byron: I will be engaging your assistance very soon as my delivery of Sphaerichthys Vaillanti have arrived even as I type this! Alas, they are one day late owing to a UPS screw-up which left them stranded unnecessarily for 24 hours in Portland. Still, five of the six are looking good.

One, alas, is no longer swimming with us.

Congratulations also on the farlowella fry! Good show!

Best to all!
Randy



thousands have lived without love; not one without water.


W.H. Auden in "First Things First"

Last edited by sidluckman; 09-06-2012 at 10:05 AM.
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post #13 of 14 Old 09-06-2012, 12:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sidluckman View Post
While nutritive value may be lessened, I hope my cooked broccolli still provides me something. My Mom insisted that it did! I would hate to think these many years later it was all a lie!

Likewise, tannins don't simply disappear as a result of heat. Yes, some tannic acid will be lost, but not neutralized.

My concern is how can we in any way be sure of the safety and source of leaves we put in our aquariums? I merely want the person to exercise caution. I recently purchased Ketapang leaves for my own use, but how do I honestly know that the same type of aerial spraying just used in Texas (in defense against West Nile Virus laden mosqitoes) wasn't used on the imported and rather expensive leaves I just bought? How do I know that drift from agricultural products in California (where our friend "Otter" lives) hasn't been present? I used to work in experimental greenhouses and what troubles me about pesticides is the fact that very often they are mixed with chemicals precisely designed to cause them to adhere to leaf surfaces. Personnally I don't care whether they are rinsed or slightly blanched, but however you clean them, clean them well.


Mr Byron: I will be engaging your assistance very soon as my delivery of Sphaerichthys Vaillanti have arrived even as I type this! Alas, they are one day late owing to a UPS screw-up which left them stranded unnecessarily for 24 hours in Portland. Still, five of the six are looking good.

One, alas, is no longer swimming with us.

Congratulations also on the farlowella fry! Good show!

Best to all!
Randy
I can't speak for leaves purchased in a fish store; but hopefully they are safe, as one hopes the wood and rock purchased there is too.

I don't know the exact figure, but there is not a lot of nutrient in a dead leaf so i would not do more than rinse it. I don't even do that, but then i collect my oak leaves in my back garden in the autumn after they have fallen, and I use no pesticides or fertilizers there. I let them completely dry on the ground, then i bring them in and lay them out flat to fully dry.

Sprays would have entered the leaves as well as be on the surface, so if the leaf has to be boiled, it needs to be boiled so extensively there would certainly be nothing of value left as far as i can see.

My Farlowella spawn regularly, that is the easy part. Feeeding the fry has proven to be very difficult. I've tried the blanched spinach, green beans, zuchini, but none of this was eaten and only rotted. Fresh green algae seems the only food, and they are browsing the leaves a lot.

I have 3 now mature fry from the first spawning 2 years ago. This is all that survived the first few weeks from more than 60. I put five from the hatching a couple weeks ago in the 10g when I happened to be doing the water change as they were hatching. I've seen 3 of the 5, not sure if there are more. On average, there are about 50-60 eggs laid every 3-4 weeks. The other fish in the tank have nutritious meals anyway.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

Last edited by Byron; 09-06-2012 at 12:30 PM.
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post #14 of 14 Old 09-07-2012, 12:29 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you :)
I will do that.
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